Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Natural Health Alternatives

Up to date news and comment about worldwide developments in natural health.

December 22, 2009

Dietary carotenoids confirmed to benefit eye health: Study
Oxygenated carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, supplied from the diet benefit eye health, according to a new study published in the Institute of Food Technologists’ Journal of Food Science. Carotenoids, a group of pigments found mainly in green leafy vegetables and colored fruits, are deposited selectively in different tissues. Lutein and zeaxanthin, found in kale and spinach, are deposited in the retina while lycopene, for example, found richly in tomatoes, is concentrated in the prostate.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

December 15, 2009

Putting the "C" in Cure:
Quantity and Frequency are the Keys to Ascorbate Therapy
What is it about a little left-handed molecule of six carbons, six oxygens, and eight hydrogens that ticks off so many in the medical community? Maybe it's cases like this one: Ray, a health professional I know, had an 11-month old son who was very sick for over a week. No one, and I mean no one, in their family had had any sleep in a long time. They were up night after night with this child, who had a high fever, glazed watery eyes, tons of thick watery mucus and labored breathing. The child would not sleep, and did little else but cry. The baby was under the care of a pediatrician, who, in the infant's eleven months on earth, had already prescribed twelve rounds of some very serious antibiotics. That they clearly were not working was all too apparent to Ray, who out of desperation decided to try something he previously had been taught to not try: bowel tolerance quantities of oral ascorbate. Ray and his wife gave their baby vitamin C about every 15 minutes. As a result, the baby was noticeably improved in a matter of hours, and slept through the night. With frequent doses continuing, the child was completely well in less than 48 hours. Ray calculated that the child had received just over 2,000 mg vitamin C per kilogram body weight per day. This is even more than what vitamin C expert Dr. Frederick Robert Klenner customarily ordered for sick patients. Remarkably, at 20,000 milligrams of vitamin C/day, that baby never had bowel-tolerance loose stools.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org

December 14, 2009

Exercise improves survival rates for colorectal cancer patients
Men who have been treated for colorectal cancer can reduce their risk of dying from the disease by engaging in regular exercise, according to a new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The findings are published in the December 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. "Previous research has shown regular physical activity reduces the risk of developing colon cancer," says the study's lead author, Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, MD, MPH, of Dana-Farber. "This current study confirms two other studies from our group that shows physical activity by colorectal cancer survivors helps them live longer than those survivors who are not physically active."
Read article at physorg.com

December 11, 2009

Retired optician 'cures own blindness with marigolds'
A retired optician believes he is the first person in Britain to recover from a degenerative eye condition – after taking a food supplement containing marigolds.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

December 11, 2009

Vitamin D may curb diabetes
A New Zealand study has found that South Asian women with insulin resistance improved markedly after taking vitamin D supplements. Nutrition researcher Pamela von Hurst of the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health at Albany, said while diet and exercise played a major part in the onset of type-2 diabetes, her findings reinforced the importance of vitamin D from the sun and supplements to prevent type-2 diabetes.
Read article at pharmacynews.com.au (Australia)

December 9, 2009

Grape juice can reduce memory loss, study suggests
Drinking purple grape juice can reduce or even reverse memory loss, a study suggests.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

December 8, 2009

Omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk of colon cancer
Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, primarily found in fish and seafood, may have a role in colorectal cancer prevention, according to results presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held Dec. 6-9, 2009, in Houston.
Read article at physorg.com

December 8, 2009

Exercise reduces death rate in prostate cancer patients
As little as 15 minutes of exercise a day can reduce overall mortality rates in patients with prostate cancer, according to findings presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held here, Dec. 6-9, 2009.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Men who engaged in three or more hours of Metabolic Equivalent Tasks (MET) a week — equivalent to jogging, biking, swimming or playing tennis for about a half-hour per week — had a 35 percent lower risk of overall mortality.

December 7, 2009

Antioxidant Compound Reduced Incidence of Colorectal Metachronous Adenomas
Supplementation with a selenium-based antioxidant compound decreased the risk of developing new polyps of the large bowel -- called colorectal metachronous adenomas -- in people who previously had colorectal polyps removed.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

December 7, 2009

Vitamin D May Boost Lymphoma Survival
Study Shows Low Vitamin D Levels Boost Risk of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Healthy levels of vitamin D may help patients with a certain type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma live longer. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have discovered that patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and low vitamin D levels are two times more likely to die from the cancer than patients with optimal levels. Deficient vitamin D levels also increased the chances of cancer progression.
Read article at webmd.com

December 3, 2009

Pine bark extract may boost diabetic eye health
Supplements of French maritime pine bark extract may improve the flow of blood in the tiny blood vessels of the retina, and enhance sight in diabetics with early stage eye problems, says a new study. Visual acuity, or the clearness of vision, was found to improve from 14/20 to 17/20 in people with early stage retina damage associated with diabetes (diabetic retinopathy) following daily supplements of the pine bark extract, Pycnogenol, for two months.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 3, 2009

Maternal folic acid may slash heart problems in children
Folic acid supplements during pregnancy may not only reduce the risk of birth defects but also protect the children from congenital heart defects, says a new study from the Netherlands. Children of women who took at least 400 micrograms per day during pregnancy were about 20 per cent less likely to develop congenital heart defects (CHDs), compared to children of women who did not take additional folic acid, according to findings published this week in the European Heart Journal.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 2, 2009

Calcium and vit D show promise for colorectal health
Supplements of calcium and vitamin D may promote the health of the cells in the colon and rectum, offering potential protection from tumour development, says a new study. The mineral-vitamin combination was found to normalise the health of cells in the colon and rectum, according to findings published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

November 30, 2009

Omega-3 plus glucosamine ‘superior’ for joint health: Study
Combining omega-3 fatty acids with glucosamine achieves better improvements in joint health than glucosamine alone, says a new study from Germany. The study, published in the journal Advances in Therapy, is said to be the first clinical trial to employ the combination of glucosamine omega-3 fatty acids in people suffering from osteoarthritis
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: This study provides further support for the research findings of Dr. Rath, Dr. Niedzwiecki and their researchers at the Dr. Rath Research Institute, who, for some years now, have focused their attention on nutrient synergy as the most effective approach to optimizing cellular metabolism and restoring its balance. The concept of nutrient synergy maximizes the health benefits of micronutrients because of the discovery that they work best in "teams". Thus, it is not the intake of any one single nutrient that ensures full health, but the intake of a complete spectrum of various different micronutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids and trace elements. To read about clinical studies conducted by the Dr. Rath Research Institute that utilize nutrient synergy, click here.

November 25, 2009

Study Finds Eating Fruits and Vegetables Lowers Risks of Heart Disease
A new study of adults aged 70 or older found that increased servings of fruits and vegetables were significantly associated with a decrease of cognitive impairment, and that those eating three or more servings of vegetables per day had a 30 percent lower risk of death from heart disease.
Read article at physorg.com

November 24, 2009

Vitamin D is ‘nature's antibiotic’
Vitamin D is being appreciated as "nature's antibiotic” as a string of recent discoveries about the multiple health benefits of this nutrient have come to the fore.
Right from the health of your immune system to prevention of heart disease and even vulnerability to influenza, vitamin D is now seen as one of the most critical nutrients for overall health. But it is also one of those most likely to be deficient – especially during winter when production of the "sunshine vitamin" almost grinds to a halt for people.
Read article in The Times of India

November 21, 2009

Vitamin D - the missing link for multiple sclerosis sufferers
Scientists have uncovered increasing evidence of the significance of Vitamin D in the development of multiple sclerosis. Now, Australian researchers have found that Vitamin D may actually reduce its symptoms.
Read article in the Daily Mail (UK)

November 16, 2009

Vitamin D cuts risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study suggests maintaining high levels of vitamin D in the blood help reduce risk of stroke, heart disease and death significantly even in healthy people who never have heart disease. People with very low levels of vitamin D were 77 percent more likely to die, 45 percent more likely to suffer coronary artery disease and 78 percent were more likely to have a stroke than those with normal levels of the sunshine vitamin, the study found. Patients with very low levels of vitamin D were twice as likely to suffer heart failure than those who had normal vitamin D levels.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

November 5, 2009

Green tea shows promise as chemoprevention agent for oral cancer, study finds
Green tea extract has shown promise as cancer prevention agent for oral cancer in patients with a pre-malignant condition known as oral leukoplakia, according to researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The study, published online in Cancer Prevention Research, is the first to examine green tea as a chemopreventative agent in this high-risk patient population. The researchers found that more than half of the oral leukoplakia patients who took the extract had a clinical response.
Read article at physorg.com

November 3, 2009

Walnut-rich diet may boost diabetic heart health
Daily consumption of walnuts, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, may improve the health of blood vessels, thereby decreasing the risk of heart disease, says a new study from Yale. Supplementing the diet of middle aged diabetics with 56 grams of walnuts led to significant improvements in the function of the blood vessel lining (endothelium), and there was also a trend towards improved cholesterol levels, according to findings published in Diabetes Care.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

November 2, 2009

Vitamin D may slow kidney disease
Low levels of vitamin D may account for nearly 60 percent of the elevated risk of end-stage renal disease in African Americans, U.S. researchers said.
Read article on the United Press International (UPI) website
Comment: Study participants with the lowest levels of 25(OH)D, a vitamin D metabolite, were 2.6 times as likely to end up on dialysis compared to those with higher levels.

October 28, 2009

Mortality rates reduced among children whose mothers received iron-folic acid supplements
Offspring whose mothers had been supplemented with iron-folic acid during pregnancy had dramatically reduced mortality through age 7, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Read article at physorg.com

October 28, 2009

Mum’s veggie-rich diet may protect baby from diabetes
Mothers-to-be should eat a vegetable-rich diet in order to protect their babies from type 1 diabetes, according to results of a new Swedish study. Mothers who ate vegetables only three to fives times per week increased the risk of type 1 diabetes in their children by 70 per cent, compared to women who consumed vegetables daily during pregnancy, according to findings published in Pediatric Diabetes.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 27, 2009

Vitamin D supplements show anti-diabetes potential
Supplements of the sunshine vitamin may improve insulin resistance and sensitivity, both of which are risk factors for diabetes, says a new study from New Zealand. Insulin resistance, whereby insufficient insulin is released to produce a normal glucose response from fat, muscle and liver cells, was significantly lower in women following high-dose vitamin D supplementation, according to results of a randomised, controlled, double-blind trial published in the British Journal of Nutrition. The optimal effects were observed when blood vitamin D levels were in the range 80 to 119 nanomoles per litre, said the researchers, “providing further evidence for an increase in the recommended adequate levels”.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 27, 2009

Pomegranate’s prostate protection potential grows
The anti-prostate cancer effects of pomegranate and its extracts may be related to stopping an enzyme in the liver which processes environmental carcinogens, says a new study. Pomegranate, a rich source of antioxidants, has been linked to improved heart health, but a growing body of science indicates the fruit protect against prostate cancer. Studies have also reported a role in joint health by slowing cartilage loss in arthritis.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 22, 2009

Red grape skin extract could be new treatment for sickle cell disease patients
An extract in red grape skin may be a new treatment for sickle cell disease, Medical College of Georgia researchers say. The extract, resveratrol, a natural chemical typically found in red wine and various plants and fruits, has been found to induce production of fetal hemoglobin, which decreases the sickling of red blood cells and reduces the painful vascular episodes associated with the disease.
Read article at physorg.com

October 21, 2009

Green tea may combat depression in elderly
Drinking frequent cups of green tea a day is linked to a lower incidence of depressive symptoms in elderly people, say Japanese researchers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 19, 2009

Med diet cuts breast cancer risk in older women, says study
Adherence to a Mediterranean diet along with avoidance of Western-type foods may contribute to a reduction in postmenopausal breast cancer risk, claims new French study. According to findings published in this month’s American Journal of Epidemiology, the incidence of breast cancer may be lowered in postmenopausal women by a diet comprising mostly fruits, vegetables, fish and olive/sunflower oil.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 19, 2009

Vitamin D may help reduce type 2 diabetes risk
A new study published in the Sept 200 9 issue of British Journal of Nutrition suggests that taking vitamin D supplements may help prevent type 2 diabetes. The small trial shows that taking 4,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily for six months significantly improved insulin sensitivity and insulin resistance in South Asian women.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

October 16, 2009

Omega-3 may protect healthy men from chest pains
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids EPA, DPA, and DHA may protect men against acute coronary syndrome (ACS), says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 13, 2009

Antioxidants may protect pilots from DNA damage
Increased intakes of vitamins C and E and other antioxidants from the diet may protect against DNA damage in people exposed to ionizing radiation such as pilots, says a new study. Ionising radiation is radiation from both natural and man-made sources which is energetic enough to create ions from atoms or molecules by removing an electron. At high altitudes, like those achieved by commercial jet airlines, ionising radiation increases because of exposure to significantly higher levels of cosmic radiation than at ground level. According to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), airline flight crew workers are exposed to higher average doses than any other worker, including those in nuclear power plants.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: DNA damage is considered an important trigger in cancer development. Significantly, therefore, and in line with Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki’s research into the benefits of nutrient synergy, the strongest protective effects were observed in airline pilots with above average combined intakes of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and lutein-zeaxanthin.

October 8, 2009

Omega-3 may prevent age-related sight loss
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of developing age-related blindness by 30 per cent, says a new study from the US National Eye Institute.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 7, 2009

New study supports antioxidant supplements for ageing skin
Taking a dietary supplement containing coenzyme Q10 and a selection of antioxidants and minerals can decrease skin roughness and fine wrinkles, according to a recent study. Sixty female subjects were randomly assigned to either the supplement, manufactured by Australian-based nutritional supplement manufacturer Blackmores, or a placebo. After 12 weeks of taking the supplement once daily those in the treatment group experienced a significant improvement in skin roughness and fine wrinkles, whereas those in the placebo group did not, according to the researchers based at Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, Thailand.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 7, 2009

Folate may prevent hearing loss in men
Increased intakes of folate and folic acid may reduce the risk of hearing loss in men by 20 per cent, says a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 5, 2009

Med-style diet 'can battle blues'
The Mediterranean diet, already thought to protect against heart disease and cancer, may also help to prevent depression, Spanish researchers say. They found depression was more than 30% less likely to develop in people who followed a diet high in vegetables, fruit and cereals, and low in red meat. They studied 10,094 healthy adults over four years, the Journal of the American Medical Association reports.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

October 5, 2009

Vitamin D For Swine Flu Prevention
Over the last 10 years our understanding of Vitamin D has evolved from a simple vitamin believed to be useful in preventing rickets to our current recognition that it's a steroid hormone directly affecting over 2000 genes in the body. Its effects on genes are so powerful that a deficiency in Vitamin D over an extended period of time has been associated with 17 types of cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, as well as chronic pain and a wealth of other modern chronic diseases. But most important is its powerful effect on the immune system.
Read article by Dr. Soram Khalsa on the Huffington Post website (USA)

October 1, 2009

Daily dose of vitamin D can cut falls in over 65s
People aged 65 and over should take high-dose vitamin D to help stop them falling over, according to research. They can cut their chance of falls by 19 per cent if they take a single dose capsule containing between 17.5 micrograms to 25 micrograms of the vitamin as a daily supplement, they said. The research, published online in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), found a dose lower than that per day had no effect.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

September 30, 2009

Omega-3 may protect diabetics from heart failure
Increased intakes of omega-3 fatty acids may protect diabetics from heart failure, according to a new study from the Netherlands.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 28, 2009

Folic acid may also boost baby’s behaviour
Recommendations to increase folic acid intakes during the early stages of pregnancy may reduce mental and emotional health problems in children, says a new study. Dutch researchers report that the children of mothers who took folic acid supplements during pregnancy were better at internalising and externalising problems, compared to the children of mothers who did not take supplements, according to findings published in the British Journal of Nutrition. The research adds to the mother and child benefits of folic acid, in addition to the established link at reducing the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 28, 2009

Vitamin D and Calcium Act Jointly to Prevent Cancer
An article published in the Sept 2009 issue of Anticancer Research suggests that vitamin D supplements may better be used together with calcium supplements to prevent cancer. Low, insufficient or deficient vitamin D is now considered as a risk factor by many researchers for various types of cancer. For example, scientists suggest that maintaining high levels of vitamin D can reduce risk of breast cancer by up to 70 percent.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

September 22, 2009

Vitamin B-6 Could Help Men Survive Prostate Cancer
Taking a daily dose of Vitamin B-6 could improve a man's chance of surviving prostate cancer. A new study says men with early-stage prostate cancer who took high doses of the vitamin only had a five percent risk of dying than their counter-parts who took low doses or none at all.
Read article at KAUZ.com (Texas/USA)

September 21, 2009

Vitamin D 'helps combat cancer'
Vitamin D can improve the survival chances of both skin and bowel cancer patients, research has shown. Two studies showed that patients with higher levels of the vitamin in their blood when they were diagnosed were less likely to die from their disease. US scientists from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston monitored the progress of 1,017 bowel cancer patients for around nine years. They found that patients with higher blood levels of vitamin D at diagnosis were 50% less likely to die during that time than those with lower levels.
Read Press Association news report at google.com

September 21, 2009

Can an over-the-counter vitamin-like substance slow the progression of Parkinson's disease?
Rush University Medical Center is participating in a large-scale, multi-center clinical trial in the U.S. and Canada to determine whether a vitamin-like substance, in high doses, can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that affects about one million people in the United States. "At present, the very best therapies we have for Parkinson's can only mask the symptoms - they do not alter the underlying disease," said neurologist Dr. Katie Kompoliti, a specialist in movement disorders. "Finding a treatment that can slow the degenerative course of Parkinsons's is the holy grail of Parkinson's research." The substance being tested, called coenzyme Q10, is produced naturally in the body and is an important link in the chain of chemical reactions that produce energy in mitochondria, the "powerhouses" of cells.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: Research has shown that Parkinson's patients have impaired mitochondrial function and low levels of coenzyme Q10 and, moreover, that the vitamin-like substance can protect the area of the brain damaged in Parkinson's.

September 17, 2009

Omega-3 may improve blood pressure in kidney disease patients
A combination of omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) may decrease blood pressure and heart rate in kidney disease patients, says a new study. People with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which increases the risk of heart disease two- to 50-fold, experienced improvements in both blood pressure and heart rate following supplementation with four grams of omega-3 fatty acids, according to findings published in the Journal of Hypertension. Furthermore, when taken in combination with coenzyme Q10 the blood pressure reducing benefits were enhanced, despite CoQ10 alone not being associated with any improvements on its own, report researchers from University of Western Australia and Royal Perth Hospital.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: The effect upon blood pressure obtained by combining coenzyme Q10 with omega-3 fatty acids is an example of nutrient synergy. The concept of nutrient synergy maximizes the health benefits of micronutrients because of the discovery that they work best in "teams". Thus, it is not the intake of any one single nutrient that ensures full health, but the intake of a complete spectrum of various different micronutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids and trace elements. Dr. Rath, Dr. Niedzwiecki and their researchers at the Dr. Rath Research Institute have focused their attention on nutrient synergy as the most effective approach to optimizing cellular metabolism and restoring its balance, and have repeatedly shown that this approach is more effective than using individual nutrients, or their random combination. To read about clinical studies conducted by the Dr. Rath Research Institute that utilize nutrient synergy, click here.

September 15, 2009

Celiacs may benefit from antioxidant supplements
Sufferers of celiac disease have significantly reduced antioxidant capacity, says a new study, and could need natural antioxidants and appropriate dietary supplements. According to findings published in the Clinical Biochemistry, the major reduction in their antioxidant levels is due to a reduction in levels of the antioxidant glutathione. “As glutathione could be regenerated by other antioxidants, a diet rich in natural antioxidants, as well as appropriate dietary supplements, could be important complements to the classic therapy of celiac disease,” wrote the researchers, led by Vesna Stojiljkovic from the University of Belgrade.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

September 14, 2009

Antioxidant ingredient proven to relieve stress
A dietary ingredient derived from a melon rich in antioxidant superoxide dismutase enzymes has been shown to relieve stress. In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial, published in BioMed Central's open access, researchers found that the supplement decreased the signs and symptoms of perceived stress and fatigue in healthy volunteers.
Read article at physorg.com

September 14, 2009

Active older adults live longer, have better functional status
Older adults who continue or begin to do any amount of exercise appear to live longer and have a lower risk of disability, according to a report in the September 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Read article at physorg.com

September 10, 2009

Onion compound may protect colon from cancer: Study
Increased intakes of the compound quercetin, found in onions and apples, may reduce the risk of developing cancer of the colon by 50 per cent, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 10, 2009

Blueberry is food for thought
A blueberry smoothie at breakfast can stop your powers of concentration waning in the afternoon - and even help fight dementia in the long term, new research suggests. Scientists have found that the food can increase your attention span in the short term and can maintain a healthy mind in the long term. They found that just one 200g blueberry smoothie was enough to increase powers of concentration by as much as 20 per cent over the day. Regular consumption of the fruit could lead to a rewiring of a part of the brain that is linked to memory.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

September 9, 2009

Study Reveals New Role of Vitamin C in Skin Protection
Scientists have uncovered a new role played by Vitamin C in protecting the skin. Researchers at the University of Leicester and Institute for Molecular and Cellular Biology in Portugal studied new protective properties of vitamin C in cells from the human skin, which could lead to better skin regeneration. The work, by Tiago Duarte, Marcus S. Cooke and G. Don Jones, found that a form of Vitamin C helped to promote wound healing and also helped protect the DNA damage of skin cells. Their findings have been published in the journal Free Radical Biology and Medicine.
Read article at physorg.com

September 9, 2009

Regular aerobic exercise reduces health concerns associated with fatty liver
Researchers from the University of Sydney, Australia determined that patients with a sedentary lifestyle who engage in routine physical activities lower their risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The lower risk of problems associated with fatty liver was not contingent upon weight loss, but a direct result from the increased aerobic exercise. The results of this study are published in the October issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.
Read article at physorg.com

September 8, 2009

Green tea slashes heart disease death risk: Study
Seven cups of green tea a day over the long-term may massively reduce the risk of death from colorectal cancer and heart disease, suggests a new study from Japan. Compared to people who drank less than one cup a day, seven or more cups of green tea a day may reduce the risk of dying from heart disease by a whopping 75 per cent, report scientists from Okayama University in the Annals of Epidemiology. Additionally, a reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer mortality of 31 per cent was observed for people who drank more than seven cups of green tea a day, compared to people who drank less than three cups a day.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

September 4, 2009

Folate may improve artery function and heart health
Supplements of folic acid may improve cardiovascular health and reduce the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), suggests a new study. Daily doses of 400 micrograms of the B vitamin led to significant improvements in blood pressure and improved blood flow after 16 weeks of supplementation, according to results published in the British Journal of Surgery. Furthermore, equal doses of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), the naturally circulating form of folate, produced the same results, leading the researchers to conclude that “5-MTHF may be a safe and effective alternative to folic acid”.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 2, 2009

Experts urge wider folic acid use
Women of childbearing age have been urged to take folic acid supplements, even if they are not planning a family. The Scottish Spina Bifida Association said 15 babies had been born in Scotland with the condition since January - double the normal number. It said folic acid supplements, which research suggests can prevent many cases, were often taken too late. Its advice targets all sexually active women of childbearing age because of the numbers of unplanned pregnancies.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

August 26, 2009

More Support for Multivitamins in Lowering Heart Disease Death Risk
Long-term regular use of a multivitamin may reduce the risk of dying from heart disease by 16%, and vitamin E use was associated with a 28% decrease in risk, according to a new study. The new study, from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center at the University of Washington, looked at 77,719 Washington State residents from 50-76 years old. The results showed that the use of multivitamins was associated with a 16% decreased risk of death from Cardiovascular Disease. Intakes of vitamin E over 215 milligrams per day over the course of ten years were also associated with a 28% reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease.
Read article at christianpost.com

August 25, 2009

Vitamin D may be heart protective
A deficiency of the sunshine vitamin may worsen plaque accumulation in vessels of diabetes patients
Vitamin D deficiency may exacerbate the excess heart disease risk that people with type 2 diabetes face, a new study in the Aug. 25 Circulation suggests. In lab tests, researchers demonstrate that immune cells with very low vitamin D levels turn into soggy, cholesterol-filled baggage that can become building blocks of arterial plaques.
Read article at sciencenews.org

August 20, 2009

Vitamin D may reduce pre-eclampsia risk: Study
Increased intakes of vitamin D during pregnancy may reduce the development by about 25 per cent, suggests a study with over 20,000 Norwegian women. The risk of pre-eclampsia was 27 per cent lower in women who consumed vitamin D supplements with daily doses of 10 to 15 micrograms, compared to women who did not take supplements, according to researchers from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 19, 2009

Omega-3, vitamin E mix shows potential for autistic speech
A combination of omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E may lead to speech improvements in autistic children with verbal disorders, suggests a new study. Verbal apraxia is a speech disorder common in autism, and an estimated 50 per cent of children with autism have apraxia. Furthermore, many thousands more are reported to have apraxia but are not autistic. According to new research published in the journal Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, daily supplements of omega-3 and vitamin E were associated with improvements in speech, imitation, eye contact, and behaviour.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

August 17, 2009

Chinese Herb May Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis
Thunder God Vine’ May Work as Natural Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms
A new study shows that the Chinese herbal remedy Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TwHF), also known as “lei gong teng” or "thunder god vine," helped decrease joint tenderness and pain in a small group of people treated with the medicinal plant. Those who took an extract of the herb's roots experienced greater improvement in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms than those who took the anti-inflammatory drug sulfasalazine.
Read article at webmd.com

August 13, 2009

Lycopene linked to healthier blood vessels
Higher levels of lycopene in the blood are associated with lower stiffness in the arteries, says a new study supporting the heart health benefits of the carotenoid. Women with the highest levels of lycopene also had the lowest levels of oxidized LDL-cholesterol, according to a study with 264 women published in the journal Atherosclerosis. Oxidation of LDLs is thought to play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries. Increasing LDL's resistance to oxidation is thought to possibly delay the progression of the disease.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 11, 2009

Exercise and Mediterranean-type diet combined associated with lower risk for Alzheimer's
Both being more physically active and adhering to a Mediterranean-type diet appears to be associated with reduced Alzheimer's risk, according to a new report in the August 12, 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The study found that those subjects who were very physically active had a 33 percent risk reduction of Alzheimer's; those who adhered more strongly to a Mediterranean-type diet had a 40 percent risk reduction. In addition, it found that there was a gradual decreasing risk for Alzheimer's in study participants who were reporting that they were both exercising a lot and following a diet closer to the Mediterranean-type: those subjects had a 60 percent reduction in their risk for developing Alzheimer's disease.

August 10, 2009

Lutein, blackcurrant extract may reduce visual fatigue: Study
A supplement containing lutein, zeaxanthin and blackcurrant extract may reverse signs of visual fatigue, according to a new study from Japan and Singapore. Visual fatigue, caused by many factors, not least staring at computer monitors for long hours, may be eased a daily supplement containing blackcurrant fruit extract (200 mg), lutein (5 mg), and zeaxanthin (1 mg), according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 10, 2009

Omega-3 fish oils linked to better semen quality
Infertile men have lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their sperm than fertile men, suggests new research that opens up the possibility for supplements to boost sperm quality. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 was also found to be higher in infertile men, according to findings from a study with 150 men in Iran in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 6, 2009

Beetroot juice 'boosts stamina'
Drinking beetroot juice boosts stamina and could help people exercise for up to 16% longer, a UK study suggests. A University of Exeter team found nitrate contained in the vegetable leads to a reduction in oxygen uptake - making exercise less tiring. The small Journal of Applied Physiology study suggests the effect is greater than that which can be achieved by regular training. Beetroot juice has previously been shown to reduce blood pressure.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

August 4, 2009

Omega-3 review: Half a gram needed for heart benefits
The science behind the cardiovascular health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids supports recommended daily levels of 500 mg, according to a ‘state-of-the-art’ review. “Compelling evidence” from studies involving almost 40,000 participants supports daily EPA plus DHA intakes of at least 500 mg per day for healthy individuals, while people with known heart disease or heart failure should aim for up to 1,000 mg daily, according to a review published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 4, 2009

Low vitamin D levels linked to metabolic syndrome
Increasing blood levels of vitamin D are linked to a lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, as well as improved ‘good’ cholesterol levels, says a new study. According to findings published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, the lowest levels of the sunshine vitamin were associated with a 31 per cent prevalence of metabolic syndrome, compared to only 10 per cent for people wit the highest average levels.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 3, 2009

Anthocyanins linked to improved cholesterol levels
Increased intakes of antioxidant anthocyanins may improve levels of HDL and LDL cholesterol, according to results of a new human study with 120 people. Consumption of berry-derived anthocyanin supplements resulted in a 13.7 per cent increase in levels of HDL cholesterol, and a 13.6 per cent reduction in levels LDL cholesterol, according to findings published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 31, 2009

Green tea may protect against blood cell cancer
Drinking five or more cups of green tea per day may reduce the risk of blood- and lymph-based cancers by about 50 per cent, says a new study from Japan.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 28, 2009

High-dose, short-term folate may cut blood pressure
A short-term, high-dose supplementation period with folate may reduce blood pressure, and improve other cardiovascular measures, suggests a small study from Italy. Fifteen post-menopausal women received a daily dose of 15 mg of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the naturally circulating form of folate, for three weeks, and experienced an average drop in systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 4.5 and 5.3 mmHg, respectively.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 28, 2009

Intense exercise may cut risk of cancer death: study
Men who regularly do heart-pounding exercise are less likely to develop cancer, according to a study released Tuesday. The study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found that the key factor in the reduced risk of cancer was a higher rate of oxygen consumption.
Read AFP news report at google.com

July 22, 2009

Potassium supplement may ease epileptic kidney issues
A daily supplement of potassium citrate may prevent painful kidney stones developing in epileptics adhering to a high-fat ketogenic diet, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 20, 2009

Multivitamins may lower heart disease death risk
Long-term regular consumption of a multivitamin may reduce the risk of dying from heart disease by 16 per cent, according to a new study from the US. Intakes of vitamin E over 215 milligrams per day over the course of ten years were also associated with a 28 per cent reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to findings published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 17, 2009

Daily dose of baking soda ‘can keep kidney patients off dialysis’
A daily dose of baking soda could help patients with chronic kidney disease avoid having to undergo dialysis, a study suggests. Research by British scientists has found that sodium bicarbonate — otherwise known as baking soda — can dramatically slow the progress of the condition.
Read article in The Times (UK)
Comment: Magdi Yaqoob, the professor who led the study, described its results as “amazing”, adding that: “Baking soda is not classed as a drug so this study has never been tried before.” In reality, of course, the fact that a study using baking soda - a natural, non-patentable substance costing only cents per day - has not been tried before in patients with chronic kidney disease is hardly surprising. The 773 billion dollar annual sales of the pharmaceutical industry result from the fact that its synthetic chemical drug medicines, including those for chronic kidney disease, can be patented. Patents essentially allow manufacturers to arbitrarily define the profits for their drugs. Therapies based upon safe and affordable natural substances, such as baking soda, on the other hand, threaten the drug business because they can’t be patented. To read this study’s abstract, and access its full text, click here.

July 7, 2009

Vitamin D may help prevent knee osteoarthritis
Low levels of vitamin D are associated with the loss of cartilage in the knee joint of older individuals, researchers in Australia report. "Cartilage loss is the hallmark of osteoarthritis," Dr. Changhai Ding told Reuters Health. By the time patients reach the point of needing knee replacement, 60 percent of cartilage has been lost, he said. However, "achieving vitamin D sufficiency in osteoarthritis patients could significantly delay total knee replacement," said Ding, at the Menzies Research Institute in Tasmania.
Read article at chiroeco.com

July 6, 2009

Folate linked to lower colorectal cancer risk: Study
Increased intakes of folate from the diet may reduce a woman’s risk of colorectal cancer by about 50 per cent, according to new findings from Korea.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 6, 2009

Component of vegetable protein may be linked to lower blood pressure
Consuming an amino acid commonly found in vegetable protein may be associated with lower blood pressure, researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers found that a 4.72 percent higher dietary intake of the amino acid glutamic acid as a percent of total dietary protein correlated with lower group average systolic blood pressure, lower by 1.5 to 3.0 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Group average diastolic blood pressure was lower by 1.0 to 1.6 mm Hg.
Read article at physorg.com

July 1, 2009

Study: Honey can kill superbugs
Honey has been used to treat wounds since ancient times, but recent years have seen a surge of medical interest in the sticky stuff. Manuka honey has been the subject of particular interest, with the results of a study just published by Sydney University finding that it has powerful antibacterial properties, and is even effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Associate Professor Dee Carter, from Sydney University's School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences said: "Our research is the first to clearly show that these honey-based products could in many cases replace antibiotic creams on wounds and equipment such as catheters.
Read article at cnn.com

June 29, 2009

Vitamin A supplements can reduce malaria cases in children by one-third, study finds
In malaria-endemic areas, vitamin A supplements - which cost about 2 U.S. cents each - can help reduce infections in children by one-third, according to a study published in the Malaria Journal, IRIN reports. The study analyzed results from previous studies conducted in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Papua New Guinea since 1995. It found that vitamin A supplements decreased malaria cases by one-third in Papua New Guinea and Burkina Faso. Peter Olumese of the WHO's Global Malaria Programme said although the relationship between vitamin A deficiency and malaria requires more research, it is clear that vitamin A supplements help to prevent a range of infectious diseases in children. "We do not need to wait for all the answers," Olumese said. "While waiting on results [of further studies into the link], vitamin A supplements can be used to decrease morbidity and mortality in children, including those at risk of malaria."
Read article at News-Medical.Net

June 23, 2009

Omega-3 may boost heart health for diabetics
Daily supplements of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce levels of compound in the blood of diabetics linked to heart disease, says a new study from Iran. According to findings published in the peer-reviewed Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases daily omega-3 supplements cut levels of homocysteine by 22 per cent, compared to less than 1 per cent in the placebo group.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 22, 2009

Green tea’s anti-prostate cancer potential gains support
Consuming green tea may reduce levels of compounds linked to prostate cancer progression, according to findings of a small study with 26 men with prostate cancer. A concentrated extract consumed daily for an average of 34 days was associated with significant reductions in the blood levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), say the new results from Louisiana State University (LSU).
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 19, 2009

Antioxidants plus exercise may boost bones in older women
A combination of antioxidant supplements and resistance training may protect against bone loss in postmenopausal women, suggests a new study from Canada. Women receiving a combination of vitamins C and E, and exercise did not experience any bone loss during a six-month period, while women receiving placebo did experience detrimental bone loss, according to findings published in Osteoporosis International.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 19, 2009

Antioxidants can slow loss of sight in old age, scientists find
People at risk of going blind in old age may be able to keep their sight for longer by taking antioxidant supplements, scientists have found.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)
Comment: The scientists gave a supplement containing vitamins C and E, zinc and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin to volunteers. In the trial, which involved 400 people who had AMD in one eye and were at risk of losing their sight in the other, they found the supplement slowed the degeneration and sharpened vision.

June 18, 2009

Supplement Could Reduce Risk of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnant Women
Women who enter pregnancy with a higher body weight face serious risks: higher rates of gestational diabetes, high blood pressure and the risk of a larger baby who could go on to have obesity, diabetes and heart disease in the future. But a nutritional supplement, already shown to benefit fetal brain and vasculature development, could reduce those risks in both mother and child. That's why a nutrition researcher at the University of Cincinnati is launching a local, two-year clinical trial to study the effects of the supplement in pregnant women. Principal investigator Debra Krummel, PhD, UC department of nutritional sciences, believes the nutrient, omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), can lower blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity in pregnant women. Krummel says DHA has proven benefits, but most women do not get an adequate amount of it in their diet.
Read article at physorg.com

June 12, 2009

Vitamin D linked to successful weight loss with dieting
Increased intakes of vitamin D may improve weight loss while following a calorie-restricted diet, according to new findings from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 9, 2009

Vitamins C, D pack powerful budget-friendly punch
Regular doses help ward off heart disease, cancer, diabetes
Two well-known, affordable, and accessible vitamins have long been touted as being the means to a healthier body and boosted immunity to colds. Expanded research is also proving that regular doses of Vitamins C and D will also help treat and prevent diseases such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, osteoarthritis and even multiple sclerosis.
Read article in the Vancouver Sun (Canada)

June 8, 2009

Multivitamins in pregnancy reduce risk of low birth weights
Prenatal multivitamin supplements are associated with a significantly reduced risk of babies with a low birth weight compared with prenatal iron-folic acid supplementation, found a new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
Read article at physorg.com

June 8, 2009

Vitamins lower miscarriage risk
Taking vitamin supplements before and during the first trimester of pregnancy lowers the risk of miscarriage in expectant moms.
Read article on the Press TV website (Iran)

June 5, 2009

Vitamin K2 may boost bone health in adolescents
Supplements of vitamin K2 may improve bone health in prepubescent children, and potentially protect them from osteoporosis later in life, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 3, 2009

Antioxidant vitamins may protect against female cancer
Increased intakes of vitamins C and E and beta-carotene may reduce the risk of cancer of the uterus, according to a new review and meta-analysis of the science to date. Writing in Cancer Causes and Control, US scientists report that for every 1,000 microgram increase per 1,000 kcal of diet of beta-carotene was associated with a 12 per cent reduction in the risk of endometrial cancer. Similarly, for every 50 milligram increase per 1,000 kcal of vitamin C the risk of endometrial cancer was reduced by 15 per cent, and for every 5 milligram increase per 1,000 kcal of vitamin E the risk of endometrial cancer was reduced by 9 per cent.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 3, 2009

MS research highlights role of vitamin D
Researchers at the Menzies Institute in Hobart have found that increasing vitamin D levels reduces the risk of getting Multiple Sclerosis by up to 50 per cent. Professor Bruce Taylor says vitamin D is also an effective treatment for the autoimmune condition which affects the central nervous system.
Read article on the ABC News website (Australia)
Comment: For details of how vitamin D supplements could help cut the relapse rate among MS sufferers, click here.

June 1, 2009

Folic acid even more baby-protective than thought
Baby-protecting folic acid is getting renewed attention: Not only does it fight spina bifida and some related abnormalities, new research shows it also may prevent premature birth and heart defects.
Read article at physorg.com

May 31, 2009

Women Who Run May Benefit From Extra Folic Acid
High-dose folic acid supplementation improved vascular function in young female runners who stopped menstruating (amenorrhea) because their caloric intake was lower than their energy output, researchers say.The findings suggest that folic acid may decrease cardiovascular risk and also improve performance in young female athletes, according to the Medical College of Wisconsin researchers.
Read article in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Georgia/USA)

May 29, 2009

Symposium details Calcium-Vitamin D fracture potential
As research continues into the role of calcium and vitamin D in maintaining bone health, a new study suggests a possible link between their combined supplementation and reduced hip fracture rates in the elderly. At the European Symposium on Calcified Tissue that took place in Vienna on Wednesday, researchers suggested that daily consumption of both calcium and vitamin D was linked to a 20 per cent fall in the rates of hip damage in older people.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 27, 2009

Multivitamins linked to younger ‘biological age’: Study
The cells of multivitamin users may have a younger biological age than cells from non-users, according to new research from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

May 27, 2009

Green tea helps to treat leukaemia
An active ingredient of green tea has been found effective in treating leukaemia patients, say researchers. The study led by Mayo Clinic researchers has shown that patients could fairly tolerate high doses of the chemical epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), derived from the green tea. "We found not only that patients tolerated the green tea extract at very high doses (in capsule form), but many of them saw regression to some degree of their chronic lymphocytic leukemia," said Dr Tait Shanafelt, Mayo Clinic hematologist and lead author of the study. "The majority of individuals who entered the study with enlarged lymph nodes saw a 50 percent or greater decline in their lymph node size," Shanafelt added.
Read article on The Times of India website (India)
Comment: Just as with the finding that green tea extracts can inhibit the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the news that EGCG is effective in treating leukaemia patients is no surprise to us. To read about Dr. Rath’s research showing how a nutrient combination - including vitamin C, the amino acids L-lysine and L-proline and EGCG - works synergistically to stop the spread of cancer cells through connective tissue, click here.

May 26, 2009

Vitamin D or sunshine may help treat MS
Giving multiple sclerosis sufferers vitamin D pills or encouraging them to spend more time in the sun might help treatment, U.S. researchers said. In a review for F1000 Medicine Reports, Bridget Bagert of Louisiana State University School of Medicine and Dennis Bourdette of the Oregon Health and Science University highlight recent advances in potential MS treatments.
Read news report on the United Press International (UPI) website

May 20, 2009

Vitamin D may boost cognitive function in older brains: Study
New research involving more than 3,000 European men suggests vitamin D, the "sunshine" vitamin, may boost cognitive function in middle-aged and older brains. Men with higher levels of vitamin D performed consistently better in a simple pen and paper test that measured attention and how fast the brain processes information.
Read article in the Montreal Gazette (Canada)

May 20, 2009

Review supports vitamin K's fracture reducing power
High dose supplements of vitamin K are effective for reducing the risk of fractures in post-menopausal women, according to a new review of the ‘reliable literature’.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 20, 2009

Vitamin D may halt lung function decline in asthma and COPD
Vitamin D may slow the progressive decline in the ability to breathe that can occur in people with asthma as a result of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) proliferation, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.
Read article at physorg.com

May 19, 2009

Magnesium may benefit blood pressure in hypertensives
Supplemental magnesium may reduce blood pressure people with high blood pressure, but seemingly normal magnesium levels, says a new study from Korea.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 12, 2009

Kava reduces anxiety and improves mood
A clinical trial found a water-soluble extract of Kava was effective in treating anxiety and improving mood, researchers in Australia said. Lead researcher Jerome Sarris, a doctoral candidate at the University of Queensland, said the placebo-controlled study found Kava to be an effective and safe treatment option for people with chronic anxiety and varying levels of depression.
Read news report on the United Press International (UPI) website

May 12, 2009

Preconceptional folic acid supplements are associated with reduced risk of premature birth
Taking folic acid supplements for at least a year before conception is associated with reduction in the risk of premature birth, according to a study by Radek Bukowski (from the University of Texas Medical Branch, United States of America) and colleagues, published in this week's PLoS Medicine.
Read article at physorg.com

May 11, 2009

Mediterranean diet may lower blood pressure: Study
Following a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in olive oil and fruit and vegetables, may improve vascular health and reduce the risk of hypertension, says a new study. According to findings published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a diet rich in olive oil, and fruit and vegetables was associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of hypertension.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

May 8, 2009

The cardiovascular benefits of daily exercise in school children are evident even after one year
School children as young as 11 can benefit from a daily exercise programme in reducing their levels of several known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An ongoing study, which began four years ago in the German city of Leipzig, shows already that children assigned to daily exercise lessons reduced their overall prevalence of obesity, improved their exercise capacity, increased their levels of HDL-cholesterol, and reduced their systolic blood pressure.
Read article at physorg.com

May 6, 2009

Selenium linked to lower skin cancer risks
Higher blood levels of selenium may reduce the incidence of skin cancer by about 60 per cent, according to a new study from Dutch and Australian researchers. Writing in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, the researchers report that the mineral was associated with reduced risks of both basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 6, 2009

Vitamins and minerals reduce asthma symptoms
A rash of studies show vital role of vitamins A, C, D, folates, zinc and omega 3
A rash of new studies and a review of 40 older studies spanning 30 years and from all over the world, show the crucial role of basic nutrients in reducing the incidence and severity of asthma.
Read article on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)

May 5, 2009

B6 may slash colorectal cancer risk: Harvard study
Increased intake of vitamin B6 from diet and supplements may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by over 50 per cent, suggests a new study. Almost 15,000 people took part in the study, which reported that increased blood levels of the vitamin’s active form, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), were significantly associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer, according to findings published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. The study follows similar findings from Scotland-based researchers published in the same journal last year.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

April 30, 2009

Folic acid may help treat allergies, asthma
Folic acid, or vitamin B9, essential for red blood cell health and long known to reduce the risk of spinal birth defects, may also suppress allergic reactions and lessen the severity of allergy and asthma symptoms, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. In what is believed to be the first study in humans examining the link between blood levels of folate - the naturally occurring form of folic acid — and allergies, the Hopkins scientists say results add to mounting evidence that folate can help regulate inflammation.
Read article at physorg.com

April 26, 2009

Vitamin D hope in prostate cancer
Vitamin D is an effective treatment for prostate cancer in some patients, a UK study suggests. A once daily dose reduced PSA level - an indicator of severity of disease - by as much as half in 20% of patients.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

April 23, 2009

Vitamin D may lower asthma severity
New research on asthma is giving tantalizing hints that it may be possible to diminish symptoms of the debilitating breathing disorder by using vitamin D. A study, based on children with asthma in Costa Rica, has found that low blood levels of vitamin D were associated with an increased severity of the disease, with those youngsters experiencing significantly more hospitalizations, increased use of inhaled steroids, and weakened immune function.
Read article in the Globe and Mail (Canada)

April 23, 2009

Carotenoids may halve metabolic syndrome risk
Increased intakes of antioxidant carotenoids, and particularly lycopene, may reduce the risk of developing the metabolic syndrome by about 50 per cent, says a new study. Writing in the new issue of the Journal of Nutrition, Dutch scientists report that middle-aged and elderly men with highest average intake of all carotenoids had a 58 per cent lower incidence of metabolic syndrome, while the highest intake of lycopene was associated with a 45 per cent lower incidence, compared to men with the lowest average intakes.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 22, 2009

Vitamin D may boost heart health during weight loss: Study
Supplements of vitamin D may improve cardiovascular health during weight loss, without impacting on how many pounds are shed, suggests a new study. Writing in this month’s issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, German researchers report that a daily dose of vitamin of 83 micrograms per day had lower levels on triglycerides and markers of inflammation like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 21, 2009

5p-a-day cod liver oil capsules 'can cut chances of suffering heart failure'
Taking cheap 5p-a-day cod liver oil capsules can substantially reduce the chances of suffering heart failure, according to a new study. Men who took fish oil pills every morning were a third less likely to develop the condition, which can be fatal, than those who had little or no fish oil in their diet.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

April 19, 2009

An herbal extract inhibits the development of pancreatic cancer
An herb recently found to kill pancreatic cancer cells also appears to inhibit development of pancreatic cancer as a result of its anti-inflammatory properties, according to researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson. The data were presented at the AACR 100th Annual Meeting 2009 in Denver. Thymoquinone, the major constituent of the oil extract from a Middle Eastern herbal seed called Nigella sativa, exhibited anti-inflammatory properties that reduced the release of inflammatory mediators in pancreatic cancer cells, according to Hwyda Arafat, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Surgery at the Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and a member of the Jefferson Pancreatic, Biliary & Related Cancers Center.
Read article at physorg.com

April 19, 2009

Fish oil protects against diseases like Parkinson's, study
Dr. Nicolas Bazan, Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence, Boyd Professor, and Ernest C. and Yvette C. Villere Chair of Retinal Degenerative Diseases Research at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, will present new research findings showing that an omega three fatty acid in the diet protects brain cells by preventing the misfolding of a protein resulting from a gene mutation in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's and Huntington's. He will present these findings for the first time today at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, Nouvelle C Room, at the American Society for Nutrition, Experimental Biology 2009 Annual Meeting.
Read article at physorg.com

April 14, 2009

Omega-3 linked to lower levels of inflammation
Increased blood levels of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA are associated with lower levels of a marker of inflammation linked to heart disease, says a new study from Australia.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 7, 2009

Omega-3, vit C, and zinc may ease childhood asthma
A combination supplement containing omega-3, vitamin C and zinc may improve symptoms of asthma, a condition on the rise, suggests a new study from Egypt. The trio of nutrients were associated with improvements in asthma measures, lung function, and markers of inflammation in the lungs, according to findings of a randomised, double blind, placebo-self-controlled crossover trial published in Acta Pædiatrica. “Children with moderately persistent bronchial asthma may get benefit from their diet supplementation with omega- 3 fatty acids, Zn and vitamin C,” wrote the researchers, led by Mohammed Al Biltagi from Tanta University in Egypt.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 3, 2009

Folic acid before conception may boost birth weight: Study
Supplements of folic acid before conception may increase the birth weight of the baby by over 60 grams, according to a new study from the Netherlands. Starting folic acid supplementation before falling pregnant was also associated with a 57 per cent reduction in the risk of low birth weight, and a 60 per cent reduction in the risk of a baby that was small for gestational age (SGA), according to findings published online ahead of print in the British Journal of Nutrition. The results add weight to recommendations of a daily dose of 400 micrograms for women of childbearing age, starting before conception.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 1, 2009

CoQ10 may cut pre-eclampsia in high-risk women
Supplements of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) may reduce the risk of developing pre-eclampsia in women at risk for the condition, suggests a new study from Ecuador. Women receiving 200 mg of CoQ10 a day had a 10 per cent lower risk of developing pre-eclampsia than women on placebo, according to results of the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 31, 2009

Vitamin K and prostate cancer – study supports benefits
An improved vitamin K2 status may reduce the risk of prostate cancer, suggest results from German scientists that build the science linking the vitamin to improved prostate health. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center report that an improved status of the vitamin was linked to a lower risk of both advanced-stage prostate cancer and high-grade prostate cancer. The authors, led by Katharina Nimptsch, published their findings in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 26, 2009

Carotenoids linked to fewer hip fractures
Increased intakes of antioxidant pigments from plants may lower the risk of hip fracture in older men and women, according to a 17-year study from the US. Of the individual carotenoids studied, lycopene was found to have the greatest protective effect, while beta-carotene had a weak association with fewer hip fractures, according to data published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 24, 2009

Omega-3 fatty acids reduce risk of advanced prostate cancer
Omega-3 fatty acids appear protective against advanced prostate cancer, and this effect may be modified by a genetic variant in the COX-2 gene, according to a report in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: In this study, men who consumed the highest amount of long chain omega-3 fatty acids had a 63 percent reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer compared to men with the lowest amount of long chain omega-3 fatty acids. The researchers also assessed the effect of omega-3 fatty acids among men with the variant rs4647310 in COX-2, a known inflammatory gene. Men with low long chain omega-3 fatty acid intake and this variant had a more than five-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer. But men with high intake of omega-3 fatty acids had a substantially reduced risk, even if they carried the COX-2 variant.

March 23, 2009

Vitamin D supplements associated with reduced fracture risk in older adults
Oral vitamin D supplements at a dose of at least 400 international units per day are associated with a reduced risk of bone fractures in older adults, according to results of a meta-analysis published in the March 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
Read article at physorg.com

March 17, 2009

Birth brain defect could be treated with vitamin supplement
Pioneering research published today suggests that a vitamin supplement taken during pregnancy could prevent hydrocephalus - one of the common forms of birth brain defect. Scientists at The University of Manchester and Lancaster University say laboratory tests have shown that administering a combination of vitamins (tetrahydrofolate and folinic acid), dramatically reduces the risk of hydrocephalus.
Read article at physorg.com

March 17, 2009

Frankincense oil 'could be alternative treatment for bladder cancer'
Frankincense could be used as an alternative treatment for bladder cancer after laboratory tests showed that it can kill diseased cells. The herb, famous as one of the presents brought by the wise men when they visited the baby Jesus, does not harm healthy cells, the study found.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: An enriched extract of the 'Indian Frankincense' herb Boswellia serrata has been proven to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Research has shown that patients taking this herbal remedy showed significant improvement in as little as seven days.

March 16, 2009

Eating mushrooms daily 'may cut breast cancer risk by two thirds'
Eating a daily portion of mushrooms could cut the risk of breast cancer by up to two-thirds, according to new research. Scientists found that women consuming at least a third of an ounce of fresh mushrooms every day were 64 per cent less likely to develop a tumour. Dried mushrooms had a slightly less protective effect, reducing the risk by around half. The study, carried out in China, also showed women who combined a mushroom diet with regular consumption of green tea saw an even greater benefit. The risk among women in this group was reduced by almost 90 per cent.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

March 12, 2009

Calcium and vitamin D may protect against diabetes: Study
Increased intakes of calcium and vitamin D may improve insulin levels, and offer protection against diabetes, independent of dairy intake, suggests a new study. Writing in the Journal of Nutrition, Tianying Wu, Walter C. Willett, and Edward Giovannucci from Harvard School of Public Health report that women with high intakes of calcium had 20 per cent lower levels of C-peptide, a marker of insulin levels, while men with high vitamin D levels had similarly lower levels of the marker. “The results suggest that calcium intake or systemic vitamin D status, after adjustment for intake of dairy products, is associated with decreased insulin secretion,” they wrote.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

March 10, 2009

Vitamin C may slash gout risk in men: Study
Higher intakes of vitamin C may reduce a man’s risk of gout, the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis in adult males, by up to 45 per cent, says a new study. According to findings published in the new issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, for every 500 milligrams increase in vitamin C intake, a man’s risk of gout was cut by 17 per cent. And for men with vitamin C intakes of at least 1,500 milligrams per day, the risk of gout was cut by 45 per cent, said the findings of a prospective study with 46,994 men conducted by researchers from Boston University School of Medicine.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 9, 2009

Green tea may protect gums against disease
Consuming green tea may offer protection against gum disease, a condition that may affect over 30 per cent of the population, suggests a new study from Japan.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 4, 2009

Vitamins may help coeliac disease management: Study
Daily supplements of B vitamins may improve the overall health of people with coeliac disease by reducing levels of an amino acid linked to heart disease, says a new Dutch study. A study with 51 adults with coeliac disease and 50 healthy controls found that people taking daily supplements of vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12 had significantly lower levels of the amino acid homocysteine, according to findings published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 2, 2009

Lutein may protect eyes against long-term computer use: Study
Supplements of lutein, long-reported to have benefits for eye health, may also protect against the detrimental effects of long-term computer display light exposure, says a new study from China.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 2, 2009

Broccoli may help protect against respiratory conditions like asthma
Here's another reason to eat your broccoli: UCLA researchers report that a naturally occurring compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables may help protect against respiratory inflammation that causes conditions like asthma, allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Published in the March edition of the journal Clinical Immunology, the research shows that sulforaphane, a chemical in broccoli, triggers an increase of antioxidant enzymes in the human airway that offers protection against the onslaught of free radicals that we breathe in every day in polluted air, pollen, diesel exhaust and tobacco smoke.
Read article at physorg.com

February 26, 2009

Vitamin E, selenium may alter genes in prostate cancer: Study
Selenium and vitamin E may offer protection against prostate cancer by changing the expression of certain genes in prostates linked to tumours, says a new study from Texas.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 25, 2009

Calcium may slash colorectal cancer risk: Study
Increased intakes of calcium from the diet and supplements may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by up to 23 per cent in women, says a new study from the US. Men also benefit from increased intakes of the mineral, with high intakes linked to a 16 per cent reduction in colorectal cancer risk, according to findings from the National Cancer Institute published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 24, 2009

Vitamin D may protect against common cold
Vitamin D may protect people -- especially those with asthma and other chronic lung conditions -- from colds and other respiratory tract infections, according to the largest study to date to look at the link.
Read article at cnn.com
Comment: Recent findings suggest that people with higher levels of vitamin D have a survival advantage and may be less likely to die in a given time period than people their same age with lower levels of the vitamin.

February 24, 2009

Calcium Associated With Lower Risk Of Cancer In Women
Women with higher intake of calcium appear to have a lower risk of cancer overall, and both men and women with high calcium intakes have lower risks of colorectal cancer and other cancers of the digestive system, according to a report in the February 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

February 23, 2009

Vitamin B and folic acid may reduce risk of age-related vision loss
Taking a combination of vitamins B6 and B12 and folic acid appears to decrease the risk of age-related macular degeneration in women, according to a report in the February 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
Read article at physorg.com

February 20, 2009

Cinnamon may improve blood sugar levels: Study
Consumption of three grams of cinnamon a day may improve people’s control of blood glucose levels, Scandinavian scientists have reported.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 19, 2009

More zinc may mean less diabetes in women: Study
Increased intakes of zinc may decrease the risk of type-2 diabetes by 28 per cent, according to a new study from Harvard.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 13, 2009

Omega-3 may prevent obesity-related complications: Study
Increased consumption of omega-3 fatty acids may protect against obesity-related damage of the liver, which may lead to diabetes, says a new study from Spain.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 13, 2009

People who exercise lower their risk of colon cancer
An ambitious new study has added considerable weight to the claim that exercise can lower the risk for colon cancer. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard University combined and analyzed several decades worth of data from past studies on how exercise affects colon cancer risk. They found that people who exercised the most were 24 percent less likely to develop the disease than those who exercised the least.
Read article at physorg.com

February 10, 2009

Vigorous exercise may help prevent vision loss
There's another reason to dust off those running shoes. Vigorous exercise may help prevent vision loss, according to a pair of studies from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The studies tracked approximately 31,000 runners for more than seven years, and found that running reduced the risk of both cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.
Read article at physorg.com

February 9, 2009

Mediterranean diet associated with lower risk of cognitive impairment
Eating a Mediterranean diet appears to be associated with less risk of mild cognitive impairment—a stage between normal aging and dementia—or of transitioning from mild cognitive impairment into Alzheimer's disease, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of Neurology.
Read article at physorg.com

February 6, 2009

Vitamin D reduces risk of multiple sclerosis
Taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy and in the early years of life could reduce the risk of developing multiple sclerosis, research suggested yesterday. Scientists have discovered that the chances of developing MS are influenced by vitamin D levels coupled with a common gene variant. Children with the genetic mutation may be more at risk of developing the disease if they lack vitamin D while growing in the womb or during their early years of life.
Read article at scotsman.com (Scotland/UK)

February 5, 2009

Vitamin pills found to reduce migraines
Migraines can be a headache to treat, says an Australian professor who has identified simple vitamin supplements that can offer relief. Professor Lyn Griffiths put 50 long-term migraine sufferers on a six-month course of vitamin B and folate supplements and said the results were very positive. Study participants reported a "drastic improvement in headache frequency, pain severity and associated disability", said Prof Griffiths of Griffith University's Genomics Research Centre (GRC).
Read article on theage.com website (Australia)

February 3, 2009

Omega-3 improves menopausal side effects: Studies
Supplements of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may reduce the symptoms of depression and the occurrence of hot flushes, according to two new studies from Canada. According to the results of randomized clinical trials, supplements of ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid (E-EPA) led to improvements in both depressive symptoms and reduced the frequency of hot flushes in menopausal women.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 30, 2009

High purity chondroitin ‘can prevent joint degradation’: Study
Long term administration of high purity and concentrated chondroitin sulphate may prevent degradation in the joint structure of people suffering from osteoarthritis, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 28, 2009

Omega-3s ease depressive symptoms related to menopause
Omega-3s ease psychological distress and depressive symptoms often suffered by menopausal and perimenopausal women, according to researchers at Université Laval's Faculty of Medicine. Their study, published in the February issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, presents the first evidence that omega-3 supplements are effective for treating common menopause-related mental health problems.
Read article at physorg.com

January 28, 2009

Short fast sprints 'cut' diabetes
Short bursts of intense exercise every few days could dramatically cut the risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to an expert. Rather than slaving away for hours in the gym, people should focus their attention on quick "sprints" with each workout lasting just a few minutes.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

January 27, 2009

Green tea may protect against breast cancer: Study
Regular consumption of green tea may reduce a woman’s risk of breast cancer by about 12 per cent, according to a new study from the US and China.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 26, 2009

Cutting salt isn't the only way to reduce blood pressure
Most people know that too much sodium from foods can increase blood pressure. A new study suggests that people trying to lower their blood pressure should also boost their intake of potassium, which has the opposite effect to sodium.
Read article at physorg.com

January 26, 2009

Green tea catechins linked to weight loss: Study
Antioxidant compounds in green tea could help promote exercise-induced abdominal fat loss, according to a new study from the American Society of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

January 21, 2009

Preterm birth: Magnesium sulphate cuts cerebral palsy risk
Magnesium sulphate protects very premature babies from cerebral palsy, a new study shows. The findings of this Cochrane Review could help reduce incidence of the disabling condition, which currently affects around one in every 500 newborn babies overall, but up to one-in-ten very premature babies (< 28 weeks of gestation).
Read article at physorg.com

January 15, 2009

Carotenoids may boost bone health: Study
Antioxidant pigments from plants may protect against bone loss in older men and women, according to a new study funded by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service. An increased intake of carotenoids, and particularly lycopene, was associated with some level of protection against losses in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine in women and at the hip in men, according to data published in this month’s American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 13, 2009

Vitamin C may improve blood pressure: Study
High intakes of vitamin C may protect against blood pressure increases in young women, according to a new study from the US. Researchers, led by Gladys Block from the University of California, Berkeley, report that a one mg per decilitre increase in blood vitamin C levels was linked to a 4.1 and 4.0 mmHg in systolic and diastolic blood pressures.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 13, 2009

Adequate vitamin D can prevent diabetes
Diabetes can be prevented, and the disease’s complications for those diagnosed with it reduced, through adequate intake of vitamin D, says a report.
Read article in The Times of India

January 7, 2009

L-carnitine may boost heart health of diabetics
Supplements of L-carnitine may reduce the oxidation of LDL cholesterol in diabetics, indicating significant potential to boost heart health, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 6, 2009

Sunlight could stop short-sightedness
A spreading pandemic of myopia among the world’s urban children may be avoided if children spend at least two to three hours each day outdoors. Australian scientists from The Vision Centre say there is persuasive evidence that increased exposure to daylight can prevent the permanent short-sightedness and eye damage which now afflicts up to 80-90 per cent of children in cities in East Asia such as Singapore and Hong Kong.
Read article at physorg.com

January 5, 2009

Antioxidants may be pain relievers in pancreatitis patients: Study
Supplements containing selenium, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol may alleviate pain in people suffering from pancreatitis, suggests a study from India . One hundred and twenty-seven people took part in the randomised, placebo-controlled study, published in the January issue of Gastroenterology, which found that at the end of the intervention period 32 per cent of pancreatitis patients became pain-free, compared to only 13 per cent in the placebo group.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

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