Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Natural Health Alternatives

Up to date news and comment about worldwide developments in natural health.

December 11, 2008

Pine bark extract may help joints and hearts: Study
An extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree may reduce markers of inflammation in people with osteoarthritis, suggests a new study. According to new findings of joint German and Italian research, published in the journal Redox Reports, supplements of Pycnogenol may be able to reduce levels of a protein called C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, sufficiently to prevent a ‘spill-over’ of the inflammatory marker from the joints into the whole body.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 8, 2008

Vitamin B1 could reverse early-stage kidney disease in diabetes patients
Researchers at the University of Warwick have discovered high doses of thiamine – vitamin B1 – can reverse the onset of early diabetic kidney disease.
Read article at physorg.com

December 8, 2008

Selenium may prevent female bladder cancer: Study
Increased levels of selenium may reduce a woman’s risk of bladder cancer by 34 per cent, according to a new study from the US. Researchers from Dartmouth Medical School also report significant risk reductions for moderate smokers and people with a cancer related to a specific gene – p53. Other studies have already reported similar association between selenium and bladder cancer among women, but the new results, published in the December issue of Cancer Prevention Research, are said to be the first to show an association between selenium and p53 positive bladder cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 4, 2008

Fruit and veg may boost bone health: study
Increasing the alkali content of the diet by eating food such as fruit and vegetables may reduce calcium excretion and boost bone health, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

December 1, 2008

Vitamin D found to fight placental infection
In a paper available at the online site of the journal Biology of Reproduction, a team of UCLA researchers reports for the first time that vitamin D induces immune responses in placental tissues by stimulating production of the antimicrobial protein cathelicidin. The study involved exposing cultured human trophoblast cells to the active form of vitamin D, leading to production of cathelicidin and an increased antibacterial response in the trophoblast cells. The team, headed by Dr. Martin Hewison, suspects that the ability of the placenta to synthesize cathelicidin varies widely among women. Their discovery suggests that placental innate immunity can be enhanced if pregnant women supplement their diets with vitamin D.
Read article at physorg.com

November 28, 2008

Selenium supplements may boost heart health: Study
Supplements of selenium may increase levels of an antioxidant enzyme with a reported role in cardiovascular prevention, according to a new study. The sodium selenite supplements were found to increase levels of GPx-1, a selenium-dependent protein, according to in vitro and in vivo findings published in the December issue of the American Heart Journal.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 27, 2008

Vitamin K may have anti-diabetes benefits: Study
Supplements of vitamin K1 may reduce the development of insulin resistance in older men, and thereby offer protection against diabetes, suggests a new study. Insulin resistance, whereby insufficient insulin is released to produce a normal glucose response from fat, muscle and liver cells, was significantly lower in men following a daily vitamin K1 supplement, according to results of a 36-month, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 25, 2008

Oregano could help eradicate MRSA superbug
A natural oil found in oregano could help fight deadly hospital superbug MRSA, early research has indicated. Scientists have discovered that the herb, commonly used in cooking, could eradicate the deadly infection from hospital wards. A team at the University of the West of England in Bristol, working with partners in India, found that tiny quantities of carvacrol, a naturally occurring compound in oregano, is a more effective antimicrobial agent than 18 pharmaceutical drugs it was compared against.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

November 25, 2008

Amino acid may ease symptoms of fatigue: Study
Daily supplements of the amino acid l-ornithine, found in foods such as meat, fish, dairy and eggs, may have anti-fatigue effects, says new research. The daily dose of 2000 mg reduced symptoms of fatigue in 17 healthy volunteers taking part in the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study. According to the Japanese researchers, it is difficult to consume the necessary active doses from food sources, such as meat and fish. “We recommend l-ornithine intake as a nutritional supplement in cases of physical fatigue,” wrote lead author Tomohiro Sugino in the journal Nutrition Research.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 21, 2008

Selenium may ease onset of metabolic syndrome: Study
An increased intake of selenium may decrease risk factors for metabolic syndrome and inflammation, suggests a new study from Spain.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 19, 2008

Common vitamin may prevent skin cancer
A vitamin found in meats, nuts, grains and cereals may be more effective than sunscreen in preventing skin cancer, new research has found. Nicotinamide, or Vitamin B3, prevents damage from both UVA and UVB radiation by protecting the immune system, and could be taken in tablet form or added to sunscreen, Associate Professor Diona Damian of the University of Sydney says.
Read article in the New Zealand Herald

November 13, 2008

Hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure: researchers
Drinking hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure in pre-hypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults, according to new research presented to the American Heart Association (AHA). And those with the highest systolic blood pressure readings at the start of the study (129 or above) had a greater response to hibiscus tea.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

November 11, 2008

Study Shows Magnesium and Vitamin B6 Help ADHD Symptoms
As a disease that currently affects more than two million American children, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is characterized by impulsiveness, hyperactivity and inattention. While there are no figures available for the total cost that ADHD adds on our healthcare system, educational costs (sending ADHD kids to special schools) are $4 billion each year while “total treatment costs” for a child with ADHD averages $1800 per year. Due to the side effects of ADHD medications, which include decreased appetite, insomnia, and increased anxiety and irritability, more natural alternatives are constantly being sought. Now a new study has found that another way to help ADHD may be to supplement magnesium and vitamin B6 into the diet.
Read article on the Natural Health Research Institute website (USA)

November 7, 2008

Vitamin D may prevent damage from low levels of radiation
Radiation from natural sources like rocks and the sky as well as medical equipment can cause development of all types of cancer. A new study suggests that vitamin D may help counteract the harmful effect of low levels of natural radiation.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

November 7, 2008

Dietary sport supplement shows strong effects in the elderly
Beta-alanine (BA), a dietary supplement widely used by athletes and body builders, has been proven to increase the fitness levels of a group of elderly men and women. The research, published in BioMed Central's open access Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, suggests that BA supplementation improves muscle endurance in the elderly.
Read article at physorg.com

November 7, 2008

B vitamins may protect over-65s from cancer, says study
A daily supplement of B vitamins may reduce the risk of breast cancer and other invasive cancers in women over the age of 65, according to a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 6, 2008

Probiotics 'may stop pneumonia'
Probiotics could be used to protect critically ill patients from developing pneumonia, according to scientists. The friendly bacteria can block the colonisation by dangerous bugs of the airways of ventilated patients, the Swedish study concluded. The probiotic solution performed just as well as normal antiseptics used to keep pneumonia-causing bacteria at bay, the journal Critical Care reported. Being more natural it could pose fewer side effects, the authors said.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

November 5, 2008

Multivitamins and minerals help children's brain function: study
Daily supplements of multivitamins and minerals may improve the brain function of children, says a new study from British and Australian researchers. Twelve weeks of supplementation with vitamins and minerals was found to boost the attention scores of children, according to results published in the British Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: The researchers found that the childrens’ improvement in attention task performance became evident within three hours of the first dose on the first day of the study.

November 5, 2008

Study shows pine bark reduces jetlag
A new study published in the journal of Minerva Cardioangiologica reveals Pycnogenol, pine bark extract from the French maritime pine tree, reduces jetlag in passengers by nearly 50 percent. The two-part study, consisting of a brain CT scan and a scoring system, showed Pycnogenol lowered symptoms of jetlag such as fatigue, headaches, insomnia and brain edema (swelling) in both healthy individuals and hypertensive patients. Passengers also experienced minimal lower leg edema, a common condition associated with long flights.
Read article at physorg.com

October 31, 2008

Vitamin E may slash lung cancer risk: Study
Increasing intakes of vitamin E may decrease the risk of lung cancer by over 50 per cent, according to a new study from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 31, 2008

Vitamin C Slows Cancer Down
And, Doctors Say, Can Reverse It as Well
The BBC recently reported that "Vitamin C 'slows cancer growth.' An injection of a high dose of vitamin C may be able to hold back the advance of cancers, US scientists claim. The vitamin may start a destructive chain reaction within the cancer cell." The injection "halved the size" of tumors, and was reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study authors themselves said that daily, high-dose vitamin C treatment "significantly decreased growth rates" of ovarian, pancreatic, and malignant brain tumors in mice. Such high, cancer-stopping levels of vitamin C can be "readily achieved in humans given ascorbate intravenously."
Read news release from the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service at orthomolecular.org

October 31, 2008

Vitamin E suppositories could treat ulcerative colitis
Vitamin E suppositories may be a potential treatment for ulcerative colitis – a condition which lacks a disease-specific treatment at present, a small study suggests. Fifteen patients with mild to moderate ulcerative colitis were given rectal d-alpha tocopherol (vitamin E) at a hospital in Tehran, Iran. After 12 weeks, 14 patients showed a clinical response greater than two on the Mayo clinical disease activity index, with no blood in stool. Nine patients went into remission.
Read article on the Nursing Times magazine website (UK)

October 30, 2008

Green tea extract may lower blood pressure: study
Daily supplements of extracts from green tea (Camellia sinensis) may reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and markers of oxidative stress, and all within three weeks, says a new study. Reductions of systolic and diastolic blood pressures of 5 and 4 mmHg, respectively, were observed following daily supplements of green tea extracts, while total cholesterol levels were reduced by 10 mg/dL, according to findings of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study. The study adds to an ever growing body of science reporting the potential health benefits of green tea and its extracts, which already range from reduced risks of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, and certain cancers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 20, 2008

Omega-3 Fats Hold Promise for Mental Health
The incidence of Alzheimer Disease (AD) has doubled since 1980, currently affecting just under 5 million Americans, and expected to affect 16 million by 2050. The condition currently costs our healthcare system over $100 billion each year. Fortunately, there are some simple ways to help maintain mental health, including eating apples, drinking green tea, taking vitamin E and grape extract. A 2006 study on fish oil’s ability to maintain mental health found that fish oil increases brain chemicals and “might thus be useful and offer therapeutic benefit in treating [AD]”. Another 2006 study found that omega-3 fats have “positive effects…in a small group of patients with very mild AD”. Now a new study has found more evidence that fish oil may help maintain mental health.
Read article on the Natural Health Research Institute website (USA)

October 17, 2008

Omega-3 Fats May Improve Health in the Elderly
Known to be “essential in human nutrition”, omega-3 fatty acids (O3FA) first gained attention from the medical community when they observed the low frequency of coronary heart disease among Eskimos exposed to a diet rich in fish. Now a new study has found that at least one in four elderly can benefit from O3FA supplementation and help with survival.
Read article on the Natural Health Research Institute website (USA)

October 15, 2008

Vitamin C may protect against osteoporosis in older men
Research published in the Journal of Nutrition has suggested that an increased intake of dietary vitamin C could help combat bone loss in older men.
Read article on the Reading Scientific Services Limited (RSSL) website (UK)

October 10, 2008

Flavonoids’ heart health benefits in the blood vessels: Study
Oral supplements of flavonoids commonly found in onions and tea may enhance the function of the lining of blood vessels, according to new research from Australia. A daily dose of quercetin or (-)-epicatechin led to improvements in endothelial function, a key marker of cardiovascular health, according to results of a small randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 9, 2008

Vitamin D a key player in overall health of several body organs, says UC Riverside biochemist
Essential for life in higher animals, vitamin D, once linked to only bone diseases such as rickets and osteoporosis, is now recognized as a major player in contributing to overall human health, emphasizes UC Riverside's Anthony Norman, an international expert on vitamin D. In a paper published in the August issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Norman identifies vitamin D's potential for contributions to good health in the adaptive and innate immune systems, the secretion and regulation of insulin by the pancreas, the heart and blood pressure regulation, muscle strength and brain activity. In addition, access to adequate amounts of vitamin D is believed to be beneficial towards reducing the risk of cancer. Norman also lists 36 organ tissues in the body whose cells respond biologically to vitamin D.
Read article at physorg.com

October 8, 2008

St. John's wort relieves symptoms of major depression
New research provides support for the use of St. John's wort extracts in treating major depression.
Read article at physorg.com

October 6, 2008

Oral vitamin D may help prevent some skin infections
A study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests that use of oral Vitamin D supplements bolsters production of a protective chemical normally found in the skin, and may help prevent skin infections that are a common result of atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema.
Read article at physorg.com

October 6, 2008

Mediterranean diet linked to lower asthma risks
Getting children to consume a Mediterranean-style diet may reduce their risk of asthma by up to 40 per cent, suggests new research from Spain and Mexico. The cross-sectional survey of 1,476 children aged between six and seven in Mexico found that a higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet was also associated with significant reductions in wheezing, sneezing, and itchy-watery eyes.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

October 3, 2008

Flax and borage oil may boost skin health from within
Supplements containing flaxseed or borage oil may protect skin against reddening and improve skin health from within, suggests new research from Germany and France. The omega-3 and omega-6-rich oils from flax and borage respectively also led to a decrease in skin roughness and so-called skin scaling, according to findings published in the British Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

October 2, 2008

Vitamin D Stops Cancer; Cuts Risk In Half
American Cancer Society Drags its Feet
A new study of 3,299 persons has shown that those with higher levels of vitamin D cut their risk of dying from cancer in half. Another recent study shows that ample intake of vitamin D, about 2,000 IU per day, can cut breast cancer incidence by half. Still more research found that inadequate Vitamin D is "associated with high incidence rates of colorectal cancer" and specifically urges that "prompt public health action is needed to increase intake of Vitamin D-3 to 1000 IU/day." Vitamin D's anticancer properties are so evident, and so important, that the Canadian Cancer Society now recommends supplementation with 1,000 IU of Vitamin D per day for all adults in winter, and year-round for persons at risk. The American Cancer Society, however, is dragging its feet, still maintaining that "More research is needed to define the best levels of intake and blood levels of vitamin D for cancer risk reduction." What is taking them so long?
Read press release from the Orthomolecular Medicine News Service at orthomolecular.org

September 29, 2008

Vitamin K1 may have diabetes benefits: study
Supplements of vitamin K1 may reduce the development of insulin resistance in older men, and thereby offer protection against diabetes, suggests a new study. Insulin resistance, whereby insufficient insulin is released to produce a normal glucose response from fat, muscle and liver cells, was significantly lower in men following a daily vitamin K1 supplement, according to results of a 36-month, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 26, 2008

Vitamin D again linked to breast cancer protection
Increased intake of vitamin D from the diet and from sunlight may reduce the risk for breast cancer by over 20 per cent, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 23, 2008

Honey effective in killing bacteria that cause chronic sinusitis
Honey is very effective in killing bacteria in all its forms, especially the drug-resistant biofilms that make treating chronic rhinosinusitis difficult, according to research presented during the 2008 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, in Chicago, IL.
Read article at physorg.com

September 20, 2008

Vitamin C lowers blood pressure
Got hypertension? It may be time to try intravenous injection of vitamin C. A new Italian study found that vitamin C intravenously delivered can lower blood pressure by acting on an overactive central nervous system.
Read article at foodconsumer.org
Comment: Whilst this study is of course interesting, it is not actually necessary to receive vitamin C via intravenous injection in order to benefit from its effects upon blood pressure. To read clinical studies documenting the effectiveness of oral vitamin C and other micronutrients in maintaining normal blood pressure, click here.

September 19, 2008

Vitamin C Found to Help Maintain Healthy Cholesterol
Having high cholesterol levels (called “hypercholesterolemia”) is a primary risk factor leading to coronary heart disease. This condition resulted in 452,300 deaths in 2004 and is “the single leading cause of death in America today”. The American Heart Association estimates that nearly 37 million Americans have total cholesterol levels greater than 240 mg/dL. Now a new study has found that vitamin C may benefit cholesterol health.
Read article on the Natural Health Research Institute website (USA)

September 17, 2008

Study Re-Confirms Pycnogenol’s Role in Joint Health
Osteoarthritis is the nation’s leading cause of disability, limiting everyday activities for 16 million Americans. The condition results in 750,000 hospitalizations and costs our healthcare system over $51 billion each year. The Center for Disease Control estimates that the number of people aged 65 or older with arthritis will more than double, from 15.7 million in 2002 to 33.3 million in 2030. Now a new study has found that Pycnogenol may benefit joint health.
Read article on the Natural Health Research Institute website (USA)

September 17, 2008

Daily walking boosts health, survival among the very old: study
Octogenarians who walk an hour or more each day are less likely to die and or be prone to serious illness compared with less active counterparts, according to a study published on Wednesday.
Read article at physorg.com

September 16, 2008

Healthy living halves risk of early death: study
Women who eat right, exercise and never smoke tobacco more than halve the risk of dying from cancer or heart disease, a long-term study released Wednesday said. The study is based on data provided by 80,000 women in the United States who were between 34 and 59 years old when the investigation began in 1980.
Read AFP news report at google.com

September 15, 2008

Clean living 'slows cell ageing'
Taking more exercise and eating the right foods may help increase levels of an enzyme vital for guarding against age-related cell damage, work suggests. Among 24 men asked to adopt healthy lifestyle changes for a US study in The Lancet Oncology, levels of telomerase increased by 29% on average. Telomerase repairs and lengthens telomeres, which cap and protect the ends of chromosomes housing DNA. As people age, telomeres shorten and cells become more susceptible to dying.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: The lifestyle changes undertaken by the participants in the study consisted of a diet high in fruit and vegetables, supplements of vitamins and fish oils, and an exercise regimen.

September 12, 2008

Broccoli 'may help protect lungs'
A substance found in broccoli may limit the damage which leads to serious lung disease, research suggests. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often caused by smoking and kills about 30,000 UK residents a year. US scientists found that sulforapane increases the activity of the NRF2 gene in human lung cells which protects cells from damage caused by toxins.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

September 12, 2008

Mediterranean diet 'cuts risk of cancer and heart disease'
A "Mediterranean style" diet significantly reduces the risk of dying from heart disease and cancer, according to a comprehensive new study.
Eating like the Italians or the Greeks can also substantially reduce the risk of developing neurological conditions like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Scientists analysed the results of 12 major published studies involving more than 1.5 million people. They found that those who stuck closely to a diet rich in olive oil, grains, fish, fruit and vegetables, with low amounts of meat, dairy products and alcohol, were nine per cent less likely to die of heart disease, one of Britain's biggest killers. The chance of developing all types of cancer was six per cent lower, the researchers found, while the likelihood of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease was reduced by 13 per cent.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

September 10, 2008

Vitamin K2 linked to better heart health
Increased intakes of vitamin K2 from dietary sources may reduce the build up of calcium in arteries that leads to hardening of the blood vessels, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 9, 2008

Calcium during pregnancy reduces harmful blood lead levels
Pregnant women who take high levels of daily calcium supplements show a marked reduction in lead levels in their blood, suggesting calcium could play a critical role in reducing fetal and infant exposure. A new study at the University of Michigan shows that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calcium daily have up to a 31 percent reduction in lead levels.
Read article at physorg.com

September 8, 2008

Vitamin B12 may protect the brain in old age
Vitamin B12, a nutrient found in meat, fish and milk, may protect against brain volume loss in older people, according to a study published in the September 9, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. For the study, 107 people between the ages of 61 and 87 underwent brain scans, memory testing and physical exams. Researchers also collected blood samples to check vitamin B12 levels. Brain scans and memory tests were also performed again five years later. The study found that people who had higher vitamin B12 levels were six times less likely to experience brain shrinkage compared with those who had lower levels of the vitamin in their blood. None of the people in the study had vitamin B12 deficiency.
Read article at physorg.com

September 3, 2008

Folate may protect colon from DNA damage: study
Low levels of dietary folate may increase the risk of DNA damage in colon cells, and ultimately the risk of cancer, suggests a new Anglo-American study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

September 2, 2008

World-first trial proves exercise helps memory
West Australian health experts are urging older people to get active after proving for the first time that just 20 minutes of activity each day can prevent memory deterioration. In a world-first, a team from the WA Centre for Health and Ageing (WACHA) based at the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) has shown that regular physical activity can lead to a lasting improvement in memory function. The WA-based trial results will be published in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association today.
Read article at physorg.com

September 1, 2008

Omega-3 may help survival rates for heart patients: study
A daily supplement of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce mortality and admission to hospital for cardiovascular reasons in patients with heart failure, says a new study. Mortality rates were reduced by nine per cent, and hospital admission for cardiovascular reasons was cut by eight per cent on heart failure patients assigned to receive omega-3, compared to placebo.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 25, 2008

Researchers Say Vitamin D Might Prevent Disorders, Including Multiple Sclerosis
Newark, NJ (AHN) - Researchers say that people who get plenty of the sunshine Vitamin D may end up preventing certain diseases. Having more of the vitamin that serves as the principal regulator of calcium in the body, may also protect against specific autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) according to Sylvia Christakos, PhD, of the UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School. In addition, having more Vitamin D in the body might prevent the production of malignant cells, such as breast and prostate cancer in their bodies, Christakos found.
Read article at allheadlinenews.com

August 20, 2008

Grapes 'could cut risk of heart attacks'
The antioxidants and fibre contained in a pulp of red grape skins and seeds - a by-product of wine production - may reduce blood pressure, cholesterol levels and the risk of heart disease, scientists from the Complutense University of Madrid found. A group of 34 subjects who were given an extract made from the pulp for 16 weeks saw a nine per cent drop in their levels of both general and "bad" cholesterols, and a five per cent reduction in blood pressure. The 13 members of the group who had high cholesterol experienced an even greater improvement, their cholesterol falling 14.2pc and their "bad" cholesterol 11.6pc, according to the study, which is published in the journal Nutrition.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

August 11, 2008

Running 'can slow ageing process'
Running on a regular basis can slow the effects of ageing, a study by US researchers shows. Elderly joggers were half as likely to die prematurely from conditions like cancer than non-runners. They also enjoyed a healthier life with fewer disabilities, the Stanford University Medical Center team found.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

August 5, 2008

Broccoli may undo diabetes damage
Eating broccoli could reverse the damage caused by diabetes to heart blood vessels, research suggests. A University of Warwick team believe the key is a compound found in the vegetable, called sulforaphane. It encourages production of enzymes which protect the blood vessels, and a reduction in high levels of molecules which cause significant cell damage.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

August 5, 2008

VITAMIN C JAB TO BEAT CANCER
Vitamin C injections can destroy cancer, ground-breaking research has found. Pioneering trials have shown that the jabs can shrink tumours by half and kill cancer cells, while leaving healthy tissues unharmed.
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)
Comment: Whilst the effectiveness of vitamin C in the control of cancer will obviously not be news to regular readers of these pages, we welcome the publication of this research as still further evidence that Dr. Rath has been right all along.

August 1, 2008

A DAILY DOSE OF GARLIC CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE
A DAILY dose of garlic helps to lower blood pressure and can be as effective as drugs, according to new research. The discovery means that readily available over-the-counter supplements could be used to help save lives.
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)

July 31, 2008

AIDS: importance of nutrition confirmed
An 18-month study on more than 10,500 people with HIV/AIDS in Tamil Nadu found nutritional supplements improved their health. In what may be the biggest study ever conducted in India, the Tamil Nadu State AIDS Control Society (TANSACS) has found conclusive evidence that providing micro and macronutrients to people living with HIV/AIDS greatly improves their health and quality of life.
Read article in The Hindu (India)

July 30, 2008

New study shows calcium significantly improves children's bone health
A recent study published in the journal Bone found that higher intakes of calcium, such as those recommended by the USDA, may significantly improve bone health in children.
Read article at physorg.com

July 30, 2008

Frankincense provides relief to arthritis sufferers
An enriched extract of the 'Indian Frankincense' herb Boswellia serrata has been proven to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Research published today in BioMed Central's open access journal Arthritis Research & Therapy has shown that patients taking the herbal remedy showed significant improvement in as little as seven days.
Read article at physorg.com

July 29, 2008

Vitamin C-rich diet may slash diabetes risk
Increased blood levels of vitamin C may reduce the risk of developing diabetes by 62 per cent, says a new study from Cambridge.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 17, 2008

Vitamin K good for young bones, too: study
A child's vitamin K status could have important long-term implications on bone health, and higher levels could benefit children with arthritis, suggests a new study. An improved status of the vitamin was linked to improved bone health in both healthy children and well as sufferers of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to findings of the study published in the journal Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 16, 2008

Childhood diarrhea: Treat with zinc over 6 months of age
Zinc supplementation benefits children suffering from diarrhoea in developing countries, but only in infants over six months old, Cochrane Researchers have found. Their study supports World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for the treatment of diarrhoea with zinc, although not in the very young.
Read article at physorg.com

July 16, 2008

Science looks rosy for astaxanthin and stomach health
The pigment that gives salmon its pink colour may reduce the symptoms of indigestion and heartburn, says a new study. A high dose (40 mg) of the carotenoid was found to significantly reduce to heartburn, and the effects were mostly pronounced in people infected with the Helicobacter pylori bacterium that causes stomach ulcers, according to research published in the journal Phytomedicine.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 15, 2008

Black tea extract may offer heart benefits
Extracts from black tea may reduce total cholesterol levels by nine per cent and LDL cholesterol levels by 12 per cent, according to a new study from Japan. Consumption of the black tea extract (BTE) was also associated with beneficial changes in blood levels of triglycerides and body weight, according to results published in the journal Nutrition Reviews.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 9, 2008

Mum's vitamin D during pregnancy strengthens kid's teeth
Higher intakes of vitamin D during pregnancy may lead to stronger teeth in children, according to researchers from University of Manitoba, Canada.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 7, 2008

Newborn vitamin A reduces infant mortality
A single, oral dose of vitamin A, given to infants shortly after birth in the developing world can reduce their risk of death by 15 percent, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study is published in the July 2008 edition of the journal Pediatrics.
Read article at physorg.com

July 2, 2008

Green tea helps prevent heart disease
Drinking green tea improves blood flow which helps keep the heart healthy, research has shown. Green tea is already known to have anti-cancer properties and now it has been shown to have an almost immediate effect on heart health too.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: This study adds still further weight to the research of Dr. Rath and Dr. Niedzwiecki, who have long advocated the use of green tea extracts in the control of both heart disease and cancer.

July 2, 2008

Mediterranean diet 'cuts cancer'
Adopting just a couple of elements of the Mediterranean diet could cut the risk of cancer by 12%, say scientists. A study of 26,000 Greek people found just using more olive oil alone cut the risk by 9%. The diet, reports the British Journal of Cancer, also includes higher amounts of fruits, vegetables, cereals, and less red meat. A separate study found adding broccoli to meals might help men vulnerable to prostate cancer cut their risk.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

July 1, 2008

Broccoli reduces risk of prostate cancer
Eating broccoli once or twice a week can reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer, scientists have found.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

June 26, 2008

Broccoli and co may protect women from diabetes
An increased intake of green leafy vegetables may reduce the risk of women developing type-2 diabetes, suggests a new study from New Orleans. For every additional serving of green leafy vegetables, the risk of developing diabetes may be reduced by almost 10 per cent, according to results of an epidemiological study published in the journal Diabetes Care. The study, led by Lydia Bazzano from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans, adds to a growing body of science supporting the intake of vegetables for diabetes risk reduction.
Read news report at nutraingredients.com

June 25, 2008

Omega-3 boosts satiety during weight loss: study
Obese people receiving supplements of omega-3 fatty acids while following a weight loss programme experienced a feeling of fullness for longer, says a new study.
Read news report at nutraingredients.com

June 24, 2008

More vitamin D for fewer heart-related deaths: study
People with low blood levels of vitamin D are more than twice as likely to die from cardiovascular disease as those with high levels, suggests a new study. Higher blood levels of the vitamin, measured as 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), were associated with both lower overall death rates deaths from cardiovascular causes among 3,258 participants in the prospective cohort study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
Read news report at nutraingredients.com

June 24, 2008

Study backs dried plums for stronger bones
Polyphenol-rich dried plums may boost bone strength and density by up-regulating growth factors linked to bone formation, reports a new study from the US.
Read news report at nutraingredients.com

June 19, 2008

Cranberries, probiotics may fight ulcer-causing bacteria in children
Cranberry juice or probiotics clear the stomach of children of a bacterial strain known to cause ulcers and cancer, new research reports. Results from the multicentred, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial involving 271 children with Helicobacter pylori infection, published in the journal Nutrition, suggest that drinking cranberry juice or taking Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 (La1) may eradicate the bacteria.
Read news report at nutraingredients.com

June 18, 2008

Vitamin D helps colorectal cancer patients - study
Vitamin D may extend the lives of people with colon and rectal cancer, according to a study published on Wednesday suggesting another health benefit from the so-called sunshine vitamin.
Read news report at reuters.com
Comment: The American Medical Association, the largest U.S. doctors group, voted this week to urge the Food and Drug Administration to re-examine recommendations for vitamin D intake in light of new scientific findings showing its benefits.

June 18, 2008

New study: Pine bark significantly reduces menstrual pain
A new study reveals dysmenorrhea, a condition that causes extremely painful menstrual periods affecting millions of women each year, can be reduced naturally by taking Pycnogenol (pic-noj-en-all), pine bark extract from the French maritime pine tree.
Read article at physorg.com

June 18, 2008

Antioxidant-rich fruit, veg linked to less gullet cancer: study
An increased intake of antioxidant vitamins C and E, and beta-carotene may cut the risk of Barrett's oesophagus, a precursor to oesophageal cancer, suggests a new study from California.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 17, 2008

Flavonols may slash colorectal cancer risk: study
An increased intake of antioxidant flavonols from tea, onions, beans, and apples may slash the risk of colorectal cancer by a whopping 76 per cent, suggests a new US study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 16, 2008

Diabetics shouldn't forget their antioxidants: study
Vitamins C and E supplements may reduce memory loss in type-2 diabetics, a population at risk of increased impaired memory, suggests a new study from Canada. Daily doses of 1000 mg of vitamin C and 800 IU of vitamin E improved mental function after carbohydrate-rich meals and may protect against memory loss, according to a small study with 16 diabetics published in the journal Nutrition Research.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 15, 2008

Folic acid cuts diabetic heart disease
Scientists suggest that taking dietary folic acid supplements helps reduce cardiac cell death in patients suffering from diabetes. According to a study published in Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy, an 11-week course of supplements enhances the expression of cell-death-prevention genes and suppresses cell-death-inducing genes in heart muscles. The study showed that folic acid not only reduces the death rate in cardiac cells but also makes these cells more resistant to future injuries from diabetes.
Read article on the Press TV website (Iran)

June 11, 2008

Get a Little Sun This Summer – It Could Help Save Your Life
As summer comes and people across America get ready to start slathering on the sunscreen, a note of caution is in order – a little sunshine is good for you. Studies increasingly are suggesting the value of vitamin D – often known as the sunshine vitamin, because that's one way you can obtain it – in everything from bone metabolism to maintaining muscle strength, immune function, reducing hypertension and possibly even playing a role in prevention of cancer and autoimmune disease.
Read article at physorg.com

June 11, 2008

Wonder medicine plant claims to cure cancer
Scientists have finally identified and named a wonder plant that has been creating waves here for some time now. The plant traditionally called Kam-sabut is claimed to be able to cure cancer cases which doctors have given up on. Researchers from Manipur University's life science department say the plant belongs to the Euphorbia ceae family but was of a new species and a new name Croton Caudatus Gieseler has been allotted by the Botanical Survey of India, Shillong following a submission of a research report submitted by a MU team. Extracts of Euphorbia ceae of at least 10 species are used by Columbian traditional healers to treat ulcers, cancers, tumours, warts and other diseases.
Read article in The Statesman (India)

June 10, 2008

Omega-3 linked to healthy eyes: meta-analysis
A high intake of omega-3 fatty acids and fish may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by up to 38 per cent, suggests a new meta-analysis. Pooling the data from nine studies, researchers from the University of Melbourne in Australia report that the benefits were most pronounced against late (more advanced) AMD, while eating fish twice a week was associated with a reduced risk of both early and late AMD. The meta-analysis, which included 88,974 participants and 3,203 people with AMD, is published in the June issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 9, 2008

Vitamin D may protect against heart attack -study
Men with low levels of vitamin D have an elevated risk for a heart attack, researchers said on Monday in the latest study to identify important possible health benefits from the "sunshine vitamin." In the study, men classified as deficient in vitamin D were about 2 1/2 times more likely to have a heart attack than those with higher levels of the vitamin. "Those with low vitamin D, on top of just being at higher risk for heart attack in general, were at particularly high risk to have a fatal heart attack," study author Dr. Edward Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston said in a telephone interview.
Read news report at reuters.com

June 9, 2008

Calcium pills beat fractures in new clinical trial
Daily supplements of calcium may reduce the risk of fractures in a healthy population by 72 per cent, according to results of a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Emphasising the importance of the supplements, researchers from University Hospital Zurich and Dartmouth Medical School in New Hampshire report that the benefits were no longer observed when supplementation was stopped. The results are published in this month's American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 2, 2008

Meta-analysis boosts vitamin C's heart benefits
Daily supplements of vitamin C may lower levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol by five per cent, and subsequently reduce risk factors linked to cardiovascular disease, says a new meta-analysis. Doses of at least 500 milligrams per day were necessary to produce these effects, which were accompanied by an 8.8 per cent reduction in triglyceride levels, according to the meta-analysis of 13 randomised, clinical trials published in the Journal of Chiropractic Medicine.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

June 2, 2008

Omega-3 DHA shows promise against eczema
Daily supplements of the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may improve symptoms of eczema, according to the results of a new trial. Measures of eczema improved by about 23 per cent over eight weeks after consuming the DHA supplements, and this was associated with significant reductions in levels of markers of inflammation, according to results published in the British Journal of Dermatology. "With this randomised, double-blind, controlled trial we show that an 8-week supplementation with 5.4 g daily of the n-3 PUFA DHA led to a significant clinical improvement of atopic eczema compared with baseline scores," wrote the researchers, led by Margitta Worm from Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 30, 2008

Beta-carotene effective as sunburn protector: meta-analysis
Oral supplements of beta-carotene may protect against sunburn, and the longer the supplementation period the greater the protection, says a new meta-analysis. Ten weeks of supplementation were required to produce a protective effect, according to pooled data from seven studies reported in the journal Photochemistry and Photobiology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 30, 2008

Flavonoids linked to lung cancer protection amongst smokers: study
The risk of lung cancer amongst smokers may be decreased by as much as 50 per cent by an increased intake of certain antioxidant flavonoids, according to a new study from UCLA. Increasing intakes of epicatechin, catechins, and quercetin, found in tea and vegetables were associated with significant risk reductions, according to a study involving 558 patients with lung cancer and 837 healthy people for comparison published in Cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 19, 2008

Traditional herbal medicine kills pancreatic cancer cells, researchers report
An herb used in traditional medicine by many Middle Eastern countries may help in the fight against pancreatic cancer, one of the most difficult cancers to treat. Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer at Jefferson in Philadelphia have found that thymoquinone, an extract of nigella sativa seed oil, blocked pancreatic cancer cell growth and killed the cells by enhancing the process of programmed cell death.
Read article at physorg.com

May 19, 2008

Rosehip 'better than painkillers' for arthritis
Rosehip could be more effective than painkillers at easing the pain of arthritis sufferers, scientists claim.
The pain-relieving properties of rosehip, which has previously been linked to reduced inflammation in osteoarthritis, have been suggested for decades. Now scientists have found that powder made from a wild variety of rosehip, Rosa canina, is better at reducing pain in patients than paracetamol.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

May 16, 2008

Omega-3 linked to lower colorectal cancer risk
Regular and long-term consumption of omega-3 fatty acids and oil fish may slash the risk of developing colorectal cancer by 40 per cent, suggests a new study. Over an impressive 22 years of study, both omega-3 and fish intake were associated with cancer risk reduction in the colon and rectum, according to findings by researchers from Harvard and Columbia University published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 15, 2008

Vitamin D may lower breast cancer risk
Breast cancer patients with lower levels of vitamin D were far more likely to die and far more likely to have their cancer spread than women with normal levels, Canadian researchers reported on Thursday.
Read news story at reuters.com
Comment: The researchers reported that more than three-quarters of women with breast cancer had a vitamin D deficiency. Those with the lowest levels of the vitamin had the highest risk of death.

May 13, 2008

Vitamin D protects cells from stress that can lead to cancer
By inducing a specific gene to increase expression of a key enzyme, vitamin D protects healthy prostate cells from the damage and injuries that can lead to cancer, University of Rochester Medical Center researchers report.
Read article at physorg.com

May 13, 2008

Women who breastfeed for more than a year halve their risk of rheumatoid arthritis
Women who breast feed for longer have a smaller chance of getting rheumatoid arthritis, suggests a study published online ahead of print in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.
Read article at physorg.com

May 12, 2008

Vitamin D and cancer: maintaining levels key to protection?
Ensuring levels of vitamin D never get low could be a way of protecting against cancer, suggests a new study from Germany.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: In adults, vitamin D deficiency may precipitate or exacerbate conditions such as osteopenia, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, fractures, common cancers, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases and cardiovascular diseases, amongst others.

May 7, 2008

Vitamin D linked to reduced mortality rate in CKD
For patients with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), treatment with activated vitamin D may reduce the risk of death by approximately one-fourth, suggests a study in the August Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The study found that the overall risk of death from CKD was about 26 percent lower for patients taking calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D found in the body (vitamin D3). Patients on calcitriol were also less likely to develop end-stage renal disease, requiring dialysis to replace lost kidney function.

May 6, 2008

Vitamin D to boost mood in older adults: study
Increasing your vitamin D intake may lead to mood improvements and protect against depression, suggests new research published today.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

May 5, 2008

CoQ10 may cut muscle injuries for athletes
Supplements of co-enzyme Q10 may reduce the occurrence of muscular injuries in athletes, suggests new research from Japan.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

May 1, 2008

Carotene may protect against gastric cancer
A new study published in the May 13, 2008 issue of Carcinogenesis suggests that high intake of carotene may reduce risk of gastric cancer. The study showed those who had high levels of alpha-carotene and beta-carotene were at lower risk of gastric cancer.
Read article at foodconsumer.org

April 28, 2008

Rosehip reduces osteoarthritis pain, says meta-analysis
Extracts from rosehip may reduce pain associated with osteoarthritis by 37 per cent, according to a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

April 25, 2008

Vitamin D, calcium combo may cut exercise-related stress fractures
Daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D, long linked to improving bone health, may also reduce the risk of stress fractures during exercise, scientists have reported. Female arm recruits receiving the daily supplements experienced 20 per cent fewer stress fractures than their un-supplemented counterparts, according to research published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 22, 2008

High Blood Levels Of Vitamin D Protect Women From Breast Cancer, Study Suggests
A connection between vitamin D level and the risk of developing breast cancer has been implicated for a long time, but its clinical relevance had not yet been proven. Sascha Abbas and colleagues from the working group headed by Dr. Jenny Chang-Claude at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ), collaborating with researchers of the University Hospitals in Hamburg-Eppendorf, have now obtained clear results: While previous studies had concentrated chiefly on nutritional vitamin D, the researchers have now investigated the complete vitamin D status. To this end, they studied 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) as a marker for both endogenous vitamin D and vitamin D from food intake. The result of the study involving 1,394 breast cancer patients and an equal number of healthy women after menopause was surprisingly clear: Women with a very low blood level of 25(OH)D have a considerably increased breast cancer risk.
Read article at sciencedaily.com

April 17, 2008

Pine bark extract's osteoarthritis potential expanded
Supplements of French maritime pine bark extracts may reduce the pain associated with arthritis of the knee by about 55 per cent, suggests a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 16, 2008

Vitamin E may help Alzheimer's patients live longer
People with Alzheimer's disease who take vitamin E appear to live longer than those who don't take vitamin E, according to research that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology 60th Anniversary Annual Meeting in Chicago, April 12-19, 2008.
Read article at physorg.com

April 16, 2008

Omega-3 EPA linked to improved gullet health
An increased intake of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may improve the fatty acid levels composition in the gullet, and reduce the risk of cancer, suggests a new study. "After six months of dietary supplementation with EPA, we observed important changes in the fatty acid composition of Barrett's mucosal epithelium," wrote lead author Samir Mehta in this month's issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 14, 2008

Blueberries 'improve memory'
Eating a couple of portions of blueberries every day can reverse memory loss, according to a study.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

April 11, 2008

Maternal omega-3 again linked to children's coordination
Increased intake of the omega-3 DHA during pregnancy could produce improved motor function in the offspring in later life, suggests a new study from Canada. Studying 109 Inuit infants in Arctic Quebec, the researchers report in the Journal of Pediatrics that levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the mother's were directly related to levels in the umbilical cord, and subsequently in the foetus. And increased levels were linked to improved visual, cognitive, and motor development in the offspring, report the researchers from Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit and Laval University.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 10, 2008

Cruciferous veg again linked to bladder cancer protection
An increased intake of cruciferous vegetables may slash the risk of bladder cancer by 36 per cent, says new research that attributes the benefits to the isothiocyanate content.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 9, 2008

Vitamin K2 linked to lower prostate cancer risk
An increased intake of vitamin K2 may reduce the risk of prostate cancer by 35 per cent, suggest results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 7, 2008

Passion fruit peel may ease breathing for asthmatics: study
A flavonoid-rich extract from purple passion fruit may ease wheezing amongst asthmatics, suggest findings from a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Fewer than 20 per cent of the subjects receiving the passion fruit peel (PFP) extract still had wheeze as a clinical symptom of asthma, compared to about 80 per cent of subjects in the placebo group, according to findings published in the journal Nutrition Research. Moreover, coughing fell by 76 per cent in the extract group, compared to 47 per cent in the placebo group, said the researchers, led by Ronald Ross Watson from Southwest Scientific Editing and Consulting, and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health in Tucson, Arizona.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 31, 2008

ALA can benefit dry eye syndrome
Topically applying alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can ease the symptoms of dry-eye syndrome, according to American researchers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 28, 2008

Apples may help ward off colon cancer
Apple pectin and polyphenol-rich apple juice have an anticarcinogenic effect on the colon, encouraging the production of suspected chemopreventative metabolite butyrate, say researchers.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 26, 2008

Vitamin K benefits hip fractures
New research has concluded vitamin K2 consumption can aid recovery from hip fractures as well as have potential osteoporosis benefits. Published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, Japanese researchers found a positive link between vitamin K2 and hip fractures and osteoporosis, and suggested a review of the, "dietary reference value of vitamin K from the perspective of osteoporosis would be useful."
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 26, 2008

Cod liver oil can help arthritis sufferers
Taking cod liver oil could allow arthritis sufferers to cut back on potentially dangerous drugs, according to a new study. The research could offer new hope to the about 500,000 people in Britain with rheumatoid arthritis. Scientists believe it could allow hundreds of thousands of sufferers to scale down their use of anti inflammatory drugs, the most common treatment for the disease. Although they ease pain, the drugs can cause side-effects such as high blood pressure and can increase the risk of a heart attack.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

March 20, 2008

Folate 'may keep sperm healthy'
A diet rich in the vitamin folate may protect men against producing abnormal sperm and children with genetic abnormalities, a study suggests. Researchers found high dietary folate was linked to lower levels of sperm with the wrong number of chromosomes.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

March 13, 2008

Vitamin D pills may protect kids from type-1 diabetes
The overwhelming body of science supports vitamin D supplements for protection against the development of type-1 diabetes, indicates a new meta-analysis. According to data from five observational studies, infants who received vitamin D supplements were 29 per cent less likely to develop type-1 diabetes than non-supplemented infants, reports the review in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Chinese medicine 'eases eczema'
A traditional Chinese herbal medicine consisting of five herbs may ease eczema symptoms, a study suggests.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

March 10, 2008

Magnesium associated with lower risk for some strokes in male smokers
Male smokers who consume more magnesium appear to have a lower risk for cerebral infarction, a type of stroke that occurs when blood flow to the brain is blocked, according to a report in the March 10 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
Read article at physorg.com

March 6, 2008

Elderly muscles benefit from amino acid supplements
Supplementing the diet of elderly people with the full set of essential amino acids can boost their lean body mass, strength and physical function, according to a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Chromium picolinate linked to brain activity boost
A daily supplement of chromium picolinate may increase brain activity in older people experiencing early memory decline, researchers have reported. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans showed that a daily dose of 1,000 micrograms led to greater activation in various parts of the brain, researchers from the University of Cincinnati presented the study results at the 19th annual meeting of the American Neuropsychiatric Association.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

March 5, 2008

Lutein, zeaxanthin good for healthy eyes, too
Supplementation with the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin could boost retinal health in the eyes, and have benefits for people with seemingly healthy eyes, says a new study. The human macular pigments (MPs), lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z), most commonly linked to protection from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), were found to reduce the deleterious effects of glare on a test group of people with normal eyesight, report researchers in the journal Optometry and Vision Science.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

Vitamin K linked to stronger bones for adolescents
An adolescent's vitamin K status could have important long-term implications on bone health, and a better status may protect them from osteoporosis later in life, suggests a new study. An improved status of the vitamin was found to improve bone mineral content and bone mass in the whole body, according to the study with 307 healthy children with an average age of 11.2 published in the British Journal of Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 26, 2008

Magnesium linked to fewer gallstones
Increased intake of magnesium from dietary supplemental forms may decrease a man's risk of developing gallstones, suggests a new study from the US . The highest intake of magnesium was associated with a 28 per cent reduction in the risk of gallstones, according to the study with 42,705 male Americans published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 21, 2008

Co-Q10 may ease fatigue after exercise: study
Supplements of coenzyme Q10 may boost physical performance and reduce feelings of tiredness associated with exercise, Japanese researchers have reported. Both fatigue and recovery time were decreased as a result of 300 milligrams of CoQ10 for eight days, according to the double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with 17 healthy volunteers published in the journal Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 20, 2008

Meta-analysis supports zinc for childhood diarrhoea
Supplements of zinc may help children with acute and persistent diarrhoea, according to a meta-analysis of 22 studies involving about 17,000 children.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

Folate may cut male smokers' stroke risk
An increased intake of folate may reduce the risk of stroke by 20 per cent for male smokers, suggests a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 19, 2008

Calcium pills effective for boosting bone health in teenage girls
Supplements of calcium effectively increased the build up and bone mineral content in teenage girls, but the benefits are undone if the supplementation stops, suggests a new study. An 18-month randomised trial found that a daily 792 mg calcium supplement boosted bone mineral content in girls, report the researchers in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

Lycopene's anti-cancer benefits extend to colon: study
The carotenoid lycopene from tomato may interfere with levels of a hormone associated with an increase in the risk of colorectal cancer, suggests a Dutch study. The randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover study in 71 subjects showed that supplements of lycopene may increase levels of proteins that bind to insulin-like growth factor (IGF), linked with cancer risk. The study, published late last year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, extends our understanding of the potential anti-cancer benefits of lycopene, most notably linked to a lower risk of prostate cancer.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

February 18, 2008

Lipoic acid and carnitine combo show diabetes potential
A combination of lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine may boost the function of mitochondria - the cell's power stations - suggests research with implications for diabetes and obesity. Researchers, led by Jiankang Liu from the Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia at the University of California (Irvine), report that the nutrients work together, or synergistically - a result not previously reported. "The strong synergistic effect of the combination of LA and ALC in [fat cells] adipocytes suggests that these two nutrients complement each other's function in mitochondrial biogenesis," wrote the authors in the journal Diabetologia.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: Clinical studies conducted by the Dr. Rath Research Institute focus on nutrient synergy as the most effective approach to optimizing cellular metabolism and restoring its balance, and have repeatedly shown that this approach is more effective than using individual nutrients, or their random combination.

February 15, 2008

Taking multivitamins will reduce cancer risk
Taking a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement could reduce the risks of cancer and other aged-related illnesses, a scientist has claimed. Prof Bruce Ames, a biochemist and nutritional expert at the University of California, Berkeley, said excessive consumption of ready meals and fast food were to blame for increased rates of many cancers and degenerative diseases. Prof Ames suggested that faced with an inadequate supply of essential micronutrients the human body diverts them to key functions to ensure survival at the expense of long-term health.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: For information on Dr. Rath’s research breakthrough showing how specific combinations of micronutrients provide new, safe, therapeutic options in the control of cancer, click here.

Science stacks up for choline's health benefits
Increased dietary intake of choline and its metabolite betaine may lead to a reduction in markers of inflammation linked to a range of diseases, reports a new study from Greece. Subjects with the highest average intake of choline and betaine had levels of inflammatory markers at least 20 per cent lower than subjects with the lowest average intakes, report the researchers in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Chronic inflammation has been linked to range of conditions linked to heart disease, osteoporosis, cognitive decline and Alzheimer's, and type-2 diabetes.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 14, 2008

Probiotics 'protect top athletes'
Probiotic supplements reduce the number and length of infections suffered by long-distance runners, Australian research has found. Strenuous training can affect the immune system and make athletes vulnerable to coughs and colds. British Journal of Sports Medicine study found taking probiotics more than halved the days they had symptoms.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

February 8, 2008

Maternal micronutrient supplements boost baby weights
Supplements of micronutrients during pregnancy may result in bigger and heavier babies, relative to babies born to mothers taking only iron and folic acid, suggests a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 8, 2008

Study backs berries for heart health benefits
A diet rich in berries may boost levels of good cholesterol and improve blood pressure, indicating their potential benefits for heart health, says a new study from Finland. Consumption of bilberries, lingonberries, black currants and strawberries led to systolic blood pressure (BP) reductions of 7.3 mm HG, while levels of HDL cholesterol rose by over five per cent, according to the results of the single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled intervention trial published in this month's American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 6, 2008

Supplements 'reduce malaria toll'
Cheap dietary supplements could protect young children from malaria, research suggests. The study, published in Nutrition Journal, found giving children vitamin A and zinc cut incidence of illness by a third.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

February 6, 2008

Antioxidants and carotenoids linked to AMD improvements
Supplements of antioxidants and carotenoids may improve retinal health in people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), suggesting a role beyond prevention, suggests a new study from Italy. A combination of vitamins C and E, zinc, copper, lutein, zeaxanthin, and astaxanthin was found to improve the function of the central retina among 27 people with non-advanced AMD, scientists report in the journal Ophthalmology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

February 6, 2008

Beetroot 'may cut blood pressure'
Drinking 500ml of beetroot juice a day can significantly reduce blood pressure, UK research suggests.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

February 1, 2008

Folic acid intake may also reduce premature births
The risk of having a premature baby may be halved if women take folic acid supplements for at least one year before conception, suggests new data. The results are based on a study of folate supplementation by 38,033 participants, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston told attendees at the 28th Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) meeting. According to the researchers, this study represents the first and largest U.S. study to look at the effects of folate supplementation prior to conception on early pre-term delivery.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 28, 2008

Vitamin D may help fight tuberculosis, study finds
African immigrants with low levels of vitamin D are much more likely to be infected with tuberculosis, a finding that suggests the vitamin may help prevent and treat TB, Australian researchers said on Monday. Their study of all 375 African immigrants treated at one Melbourne hospital showed that those who had low vitamin D levels were far more likely to have TB infections than those with adequate levels. They found moderate to severe vitamin D deficiency in 78 percent of patients with past or present tuberculosis.
Read article on the Scientific American website (USA)

January 28, 2008

Carotenes linked to lower heart disease deaths
An increased consumption of alpha- and beta-carotene in the diet may reduce the risks of heart disease deaths by about 20 per cent, suggests a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 23, 2008

Vitamins Cure Skin Conditions
Skin troubles are a common, often painful problem. Topical applications of vitamin E, and/or vitamin C and niacin provide rapid relief. The first reports indicating that vitamin E, and concentrated topical and IV solutions of vitamin C were a highly effective treatment for burns surfaced over 50 years ago. Vitamins may be used to treat both thermal burns and sun burns, as well as wrinkles, pigmentation, scrapes, bug bites, and even bed sores.
Read news release at orthomolecular.org
Comment: As this news release correctly argues, it is time that physicians start to put the remarkable healing powers of vitamins to work for their patients. The main reasons why they are not yet doing so however are the control and denial of science by global institutions such as the Codex Alimentarius Commission and the nefarious business practices of the pharmaceutical investment 'Business With Disease'.

January 23, 2008

Hawthorn 'benefits heart patients'
Hawthorn extract can help control symptoms of chronic heart disease, research suggests. The herbal medicine is capable of helping the heart to beat more powerfully, increasing the amount of blood flowing through the organ's muscles, experiments carried out by a group of Cochrane Researchers found.
Read UK Press Association article at google.com

January 22, 2008

Vitamin E may ward off physical decline in elderly
Vitamin E may help elderly people keep their vim and vigor, researchers said on Tuesday. The researchers measured levels of certain vitamins in the blood of 698 people ages 65 and up in Italy, and then used three tests -- a short walk, balance and standing up from a seated position -- to gauge their physical functioning. They found that volunteers with lower levels of vitamin E performed worse on these physical tests than those with higher levels of the vitamin.
Read article at reuters.com

January 22, 2008

How broccoli can reduce risk of a heart attack
Eating steamed broccoli reduces the risk of a heart attack by boosting the body's ability to fight off cell damage, researchers have found. Previous studies have found people who eat broccoli, especially if raw or lightly cooked, are at lower risk of heart disease and some cancers. Now scientists have found a clear link between high levels of certain substances found in the vegetable and reduced damage caused by hearts being deprived of oxygen.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

January 22, 2008

Daily exercise dramatically lowers men's death rates
Increased exercise capacity reduces the risk of death in African-American and Caucasian men, researchers reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. The government-supported Veterans Affairs study included 15,660 participants and is the largest known to assess the link between fitness and mortality.
Read article at physorg.com

January 18, 2008

Risk Of Early Baby Death 'Cut By Vitamin Cocktail'
A cocktail of vitamins and minerals rather than just folic acid, gives unborn babies the best protection according to a new study. Infant death and stillbirths were significantly reduced amongst mothers who were given a pill containing 15 key vitamins and minerals, compared to those taking only iron and folic acid, a study has shown. Early infant mortality (deaths in the first 90 days after birth) was cut by almost a fifth - 18 per cent - in women who took the multiple micronutrient supplements (MMN). The finding, published in The Lancet, could have even greater benefits for undernourished or anaemic mums, who reduced chances of early infant mortality by 25 per cent and 38 per cent respectively.
Read article at bignewsday.com

January 17, 2008

Vitamin B6 may slash colorectal cancer risk
Increased intake of vitamin B6 from dietary and supplements may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by over 20 per cent, suggests a large Scottish study. Almost 5,000 people took part in the study, which reported a dose-dependent link between intake of the vitamin and the risk of colorectal cancer, report the researchers in the journal Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. The study, by researchers from the University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital (Edinburgh) and the University of Aberdeen, adds to an ever growing body of science supporting the potential colorectal benefits of higher intake of the B vitamins.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 16, 2008

Vitamin D2 may cut risks of elderly falls
A daily vitamin D2 supplement of 1,000IU may cut the number of falls among elderly people by about 20 per cent, says a new study. Daily supplements of the vitamin were especially effective in winter, when sunlight levels are significantly reduced, according to results of the population-based, double-blind, randomised controlled trial published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 15, 2008

Mediterranean diet in pregnancy wards off childhood asthma: study
Women who follow the famous Mediterranean diet while pregnant may also be shielding their baby from childhood asthma and allergy, a study published on Tuesday says.
Read article at physorg.com

January 15, 2008

Lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin E combo eyed for cataract reduction
A higher intake of the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, as well as vitamin E, could reduce the risk of developing cataracts by about 15 per cent, suggests a new study. Over 35,000 women took part in the study, which showed that a high intake of the two carotenoids reduced the risk of cataracts by 18 per cent, while vitamin E was associated with a 14 per cent reduction, reports the study in the Archives of Ophthalmology.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 9, 2008

More support for lycopene's prostate benefits
Lycopene may show benefits against benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), a condition said to affect more than half of all men over the age of 50, suggests a new study from Germany.
Read article at nutraingredients.com
Comment: The researchers recruited the men with BPH but no signs of prostate cancer, and randomly assigned them to receive either daily lycopene supplements (15 mg) or placebo for six months. At the end of the six month intervention period, they found that levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a marker of prostate health, were reduced in the lycopene group showing improvements in health of the tissue. No changes were recorded in the placebo group.

January 7, 2008

Vitamin C linked to lower stroke risk: study
Increased blood levels of vitamin C may reduce the risk of stroke by 42 per cent, suggests a large European-based study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com