Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Yet again, the European Commission attacks natural health alternatives.

On 17th January 2003, the European Commission released a draft proposal for a Regulation on the Addition of Vitamins and Minerals and Certain Other Substances to Food.

(Dr. Rath Health Foundation / February 21, 2003) -- On 17th January 2003, the European Commission released a draft proposal for a Regulation on the Addition of Vitamins and Minerals and Certain Other Substances to Food.

As with the Food Supplements Directive, the reasons given for the need for such a Regulation are the harmonisation of trade and consumer protection. And once again, the Commission is using the positive list approach to control the vitamins and minerals that can be used - in fact the lists in the annexe to the draft proposal are almost identical to those used for the Food Supplements Directive. The Commission has drawn heavily on the Codex Alimentarius standards in formulating this Regulation, thus ensuring that the pharmaceutical 'party line' is strictly adhered to.

The idea for this Regulation was originally floated in the Commission’s 2000 White Paper on Food Safety and the release of this draft proposal clearly demonstrates just how concerted the pharmaceutical industry controlled attack on vitamins and minerals really is. Of particular significance is Article 6 of the draft proposal, which deals with maximum limits for added vitamins and minerals. Once again the 'upper safe limit' idea is put forward, as is the reference to daily intake levels from all dietary sources.

Anyone following the World Health Organisation 5 A Day fruit and vegetable intake recommendations would exceed the 'upper safe limits' that have been proposed by the European Commission’s Scientific Committee on Food (SCF). If the SCF limits are imposed in this Regulation, combining fortified food with unfortified food would leave no room within those limits for any natural health supplements and thus the pharmaceutical industry would achieve two goals in one - regulating natural health supplements out of existence and creating a 'harmonised' global market for fortified food that it can control and turn into a new ‘business with disease.’