Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

The Baycol / Lipobay - Scandal

Investors lost billions of dollars in share value, threatening the very survival of the company.

In August 2001 Bayer had to withdraw its leading new drug Baycol because more than 50 people had already died from taking it and more than 6 million patients were at risk from the deadly side effects of rhabdomyolysis (dissolving of muscle tissue).

Following is a list of public reports highlighting the most important steps of this development:

Latest News of the Baycol Scandal:

December 10, 2003 --
Jury sides with Bayer in 2nd lawsuit tried over Baycol in Mississippi

September 19, 2003 --
Bayer Claims Vindication From U.S. Court Ruling

September 12, 2003 --
Bayer's Legal Woes in U.S. Offer Lessons for Other Drug Makers

March 13, 2003 --
Bayer Says Baycol Costs May Exceed Its Insurance

March 13, 2003 --
Bayer's operating profit down

March 12, 2003 --
Bayer Faces U.S. Shareholder Lawsuit

March 3, 2003 --
Bayer executive's testimony cites early doubts on Baycol

February 27, 2003 --
Baycol Plaintiff Seeks $500 Million

February 26, 2003 --
Bayer: Cannot Forecast Litigation Outcome

February 25, 2003 --
Bayer in Talks on Cholesterol Drug Cases

February 24, 2003 --
Bayer Shares Fall as Baycol Woes Mount

February 22, 2003 --
Documents Indicate Bayer Knew of Dangers of Cholesterol Drug

February 18, 2003 --
First Trial Set to Start for Bayer's Baycol

The withdrawal of the Baycol / Lipobay Drugs, a short history:

August 08, 2001 --
FDA Says Withdrawn Bayer Drug Linked to 31 Deaths

August 09, 2001 --
Baycol News Prompts EU Review of Cholesterol Drugs

August 17, 2001 --
Are Our Doctors Open to Bribes?

September 4, 2001 --
Prosecutors launch probe against Bayer executives over Lipobay drug

September 5, 2001 --
Bayer faces German probe and US lawsuit

The danger has been known for about 13 years:

Contrary to recent claims, knowledge of the devastating damage that anti-cholesterol drugs can have on human muscle cells is nothing new to the pharmaceutical industry. Quite the contrary: the pharmaceutical industry has known for at least 12 years that anti-cholesterol drugs impair the synthesis in the human body of the vital coenzyme Q10.