Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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November 11, 2011

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

November 2, 2011

Cherry juice gives a good nights' sleep
Drinking cherry juice significantly improves both the quality and duration of sleep, according to new findings from Northumbria University. Researchers from the School of Life Sciences have found that Montmorency cherry juice significantly increases the levels of melatonin in the body, the hormone which regulates sleep, and could benefit those who have difficulty sleeping due to insomnia, shift work or jet lag.
Read article at medicalxpress.com

November 2, 2011

Mediterranean diet and exercise can reduce sleep apnea symptoms
Eating a Mediterranean diet combined with physical activity can help to improve some of the symptoms of sleep apnoea, according to new research.
Read article at medicalxpress.com

November 2, 2011

Benefits of nut consumption for people with abdominal obesity, high blood sugar, high blood pressure
For the first time, scientists report a link between eating nuts and higher levels of serotonin in the bodies of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS), who are at high risk for heart disease. Serotonin is a substance that helps transmit nerve signals and decreases feelings of hunger, makes people feel happier and improves heart health.
Read article at medicalxpress.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2010 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

November 8, 2011

AstraZeneca Is Indicted By Serbia Over Bribes
Last August, AstraZeneca received a criminal indictment in Belgrade, Serbia, over allegations that local employees offered alleged bribes to physicians at the Institute of Oncology and Radiology, according to a filing made yesterday with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (see this).
Read article at pharmalot.com

November 7, 2011

EMA Is Investigated Over Conflicts Of Interest
Concerns over conflicts of interest at the European Medicines Agency have sparked an investigation by the European Anti-Fraud Office, which is known as OLAF. The probe, which we have confirmed, is linked to the scandal involving Servier Laboratories and its Mediator diabetes drug, which has been blamed for at least 500 deaths in France, according to The Independent.
Read article at pharmalot.com

November 4, 2011

Study finds increased cancer risk with bone growth product
Spine surgery patients who got a bone growth stimulating agent as part of a clinical trial were three to five times more likely to develop cancer two to three years after being implanted with the product, according to a new analysis.
Read article at medicalxpress.com

November 3, 2011

What's happened to Thalidomide babies?
Fifty years ago, the sedative Thalidomide was withdrawn after thousands of mothers gave birth to disabled babies. That ageing Thalidomide generation now faces rising care bills - but some hope a possible Nazi link to the drug could bring more compensation.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

November 3, 2011

The Revolving Door & A Former FDA Chief Counsel
Three months ago, Ralph Tyler left his job as chief counsel at the FDA, reportedly for personal health reasons, among other things. This week, he has apparently recovered - or at least he feels well enough to undergo the stress of returning to work and slaving over documents. How so? He has taken a job with the Venable law firm which, it so happens, has a large practice devoted to helping drug and device makers.
Read article at pharmalot.com

November 2, 2011

Boehringer says about 50 deaths related to Pradaxa
Boehringer Ingelheim's new stroke prevention pill Pradaxa has been linked to about 50 deaths from bleeding across the world since its market launch, the company said on Wednesday, heightening health regulators' attention.
Read news report at reuters.com

October 15, 2011

Breast Cancer Unawareness Month: Rethinking Mammograms
In 1984, the American Cancer Society (ACS), the world's largest nonprofit organization, inaugurated the October National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), with its flagship National Mammography Day. The NBCAM was conceived and funded by the Imperial Chemical Industries, a leading international manufacturer of petrochemicals, and its U.S. subsidiary Zeneca Pharmaceuticals. Zeneca is the sole manufacturer of Tamoxifen, which has been widely used for treating breast cancer.
Read article in the Huffington Post (USA)

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2010 news archive, by clicking here.

GMO News

November 5, 2011

Peru’s Congress approves 10-year GMO ban
Peru’s Congress announced Friday it overwhelmingly approved a 10-year moratorium on imports of genetically modified organisms in order to safeguard the country’s biodiversity. The measure bars GMOs — including seeds, livestock, and fish — from being imported for cultivation or to be raised locally.
Read article on the Capital FM News website (Kenya)

For more GMO news, click here.

See also our 2001-2010 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

November 4, 2011

Kids ‘with low levels of zinc may be at higher risk of autism’
Parents, please note – children with low levels of zinc may be at higher risk of autism, according to a new study. Researchers have found that large numbers of children with autism and related conditions such as Asperger’s syndrome were deficient in the mineral, which is found in meat, bread and dairy products, the ‘Daily Mail’ reported. The researchers said their finding provided hope for the treatment and prevention of autism. In their study, the researchers in Tokyo measured levels of zinc in the hair of almost 2,000 children with autism and related conditions. This showed a “considerable association” with zinc deficiency, especially in the youngest children.
Read article at thehindubusinessline.com (India)

November 4, 2011

Unrecognized Cancer Risks of Dental Radiation
The well-documented evidence on the dangers of premenopausal mammography are persuasive, although belatedly recognized. In striking contrast, the evidence on the dangers of routine and highly profitable dental radiation, particularly in children, are still virtually unrecognized, warns the Cancer Prevention Coalition.
Read press release at world-wire.com
Comment: In recent years, many doctors – and especially radiologists – have become concerned with the overuse of certain diagnostic techniques, in particular those that expose patients to radiation. Although infrequent use of X-ray or CT (computed tomography) scans will not have adverse effects on a patient, multiple exposures to radiation over a short period of time can cause serious damage to cells, resulting in an increased risk of cancer and other diseases. To learn more, click here.

November 3, 2011

Low vitamin D common in spine surgery patients
A new study indicates that many patients undergoing spine surgery have low levels of vitamin D, which may delay their recovery. In a study of 313 patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery, orthopaedic surgeons at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that more than half had inadequate levels of vitamin D, including one-fourth who were more severely deficient.
Read article at medicalxpress.com

November 2, 2011

Food prices in Britain rise by second most in EU
Food prices in Britain are rising by the second highest amount in the EU, with only Hungary experiencing higher inflation, according to new figures from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: Because Britain is an island nation, the increase in fuel prices over the past few years has significantly added to the cost of transporting food to it by both air and sea. As a result, in the past year alone, British consumers have seen the price of their weekly food shop increase by 6.4 per cent, the second highest in the EU. Notably, therefore, by encouraging the dramatic expansion of the world’s food trade – even in countries such as the UK that are essentially capable of producing their own food supplies – the UN’s Codex Alimentarius Commission is increasing the number of ‘food miles’ on the world’s dinner plates and, in so doing, maintaining global dependency on oil and the petrochemical industry. To learn more about Codex, watch Paul Anthony Taylor’s October 2009 lecture - Codex Alimentarius and the European Union: Globalization and the Control of Your Health – given at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2010 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

October 31, 2011

Did the Euro’s Architects Expect It to Fail?
Could it be that the politicians and eurocrats who designed the structures of the euro zone always knew they were flawed, but reasoned that a structural breakdown would enable them to bring in the common fiscal policy that would otherwise have been politically impossible?
Read blog entry by Martin Essex on the Wall Street Journal website (USA)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website. Citizens of the UK can find additional UK-orientated news stories on the Reject the EU website.

 

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