Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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August 27, 2010

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

August 25, 2010

Cinnamon extract may reduce diabetes
A water soluble extract of cinnamon, which contains antioxidative compounds, could help reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and heart disease, suggests a new study.
Read article in The Times of India

August 24, 2010

Sunshine remedy vitamin D keeps diseases at bay
Stocking up on vitamin D supplements and enjoying the summer sun could cut the risk of a host of diseases. An Oxford University study has linked the vitamin, which is made when our skin is exposed to sunlight, to the activity of more than 200 genes in the body. Some of these genes are already known to raise the odds of multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, dementia and some cancers. Boosting levels of the vitamin could keep illness at bay, said the researchers.
Read article in the Daily Mail (UK)

August 23, 2010

Eating berries may activate the brain's natural housekeeper for healthy aging
Scientists today reported the first evidence that eating blueberries, strawberries, and acai berries may help the aging brain stay healthy in a crucial but previously unrecognized way. Their study, presented at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), concluded that berries, and possibly walnuts, activate the brain's natural "housekeeper" mechanism, which cleans up and recycles toxic proteins linked to age-related memory loss and other mental decline.
Read article at physorg.com

August 23, 2010

New evidence on how cranberry juice fights bacteria that cause urinary tract infections
Scientists today reported new scientific evidence on the effectiveness of that old folk remedy -- cranberry juice -- for urinary tract infections, at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held this week. "A number of controlled clinical trials -- these are carefully designed and conducted scientific studies done in humans -- have concluded that cranberry juice really is effective for preventing urinary tract infections," said Terri Anne Camesano, Ph.D., who led the study. "That has important implications, considering the size of the problem and the health care costs involved."
Read article at physorg.com

August 20, 2010

Eat your greens to beat diabetes
Eating plenty of greens can protect against diabetes, claim scientists. A study of 220,000 people found those who ate one and a half extra servings of leafy vegetables daily cut by 14 per cent the risk of developing the condition. Researchers say the key is in high levels of magnesium, essential to the body, in the likes of spinach.
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)

August 19, 2010

Sweet pepper compounds show weight management power
Capsinoids, non-pungent compounds in sweet pepper, may boost energy use by promoting the use of fat as the energy source, suggests a new study from Canada. A daily 10 milligram dose of purified capsinoids increased energy use by 20 percent, according to findings from scientists from the Exercise Metabolism Research Group at McMaster University.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

August 18, 2010

Omega-3s could improve metabolic syndrome outcomes
Omega-3-rich supplements may improve blood lipid levels of people with metabolic syndrome, reducing the risks of developing serious health problems, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

August 23, 2010

European Patient Groups, Pharma And Financing
Given that patient and consumer groups are increasingly involved in as stakeholders and experts in management and scientific committees at the European Medicines Agency, one activist group decided to survey corporate sponsorship and compliance with disclosure requirements. Health Action International canvassed 23 groups, including those concerned with AIDS, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, cancer and diabetes, to gauge financial ties between 2006 and 2008. Here is the study and this is what was found: Two-thirds of the groups working with the EMA received partial or significant funding from drugmakers or industry associations. All in all, 15 organizations received between 0.2 percent and 99 percent of their annual income from corporate sources, while seven were funded entirely from alternative sources.
Read article at pharmalot.com
Comment: The average donation per sponsored organization rose from 185,500 euros in 2006 to 282,090 euros in 2007, and to 321,230 euros in 2008. Notably, therefore, in a classic case of understatement, Health Action International concludes that the European Medicines Agency “appears to have failed” in monitoring and enforcing its own guidelines on financial transparency.

August 19, 2010

10 Years Later, Glaxo Still Haunted by Faked Studies of Paxil in Kids
A crooked doctor who faked data in a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) study of the antidepressant Paxil in children pled guilty to criminal charges today, causing groans among GSK’s senior management as the company hopes to fend off a different criminal investigation into whether it manipulated clinical data on its diabetes drug, Avandia. She was sentenced to 13 months in prison. The two cases are technically completely separate, but they’re both about data manipulation. GSK has been accused of sitting on data showing risks on both drugs; and the FDA previously shut down one of GSK’s factories where both drugs were made.
Read blog entry by Jim Edwards on the CBS Interactive Business Network website

August 17, 2010

Five out of six new prescription drugs don't work, doctor claims
Five out of six approved drugs offer "few if any new benefits" to patients, according to a leading critic of the pharmaceutical industry. Large firms hyped-up patented medicines, spent vast amounts on getting doctors to prescribe them and underplayed serious side effects, said Prof Donald Light, a sociologist and professor of comparative health policy at the University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey, US. When the "toxic side effects" of prescription drugs were taken into account, and their misuse, he claimed they were "a signficant cause of death". Cholesterol-lowering statins were a classic example of the drugs industry overselling a product as a wonder-pill to prevent heart attacks, despite evidence that they could do more harm than good, he claimed.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

August 14, 2010

Drug firms hiding negative research are unfit to experiment on people
Another pharmaceutical giant has settled a big compensation claim. So why are they allowed to go on misleading the public?
This week the drug company AstraZeneca paid out £125m to settle a class action. More than 17,500 patients claim the company withheld information showing that schizophrenia drug quetiapine (tradename Seroquel) can cause diabetes. So why do companies pay out money before cases get to court?
An interesting feature of litigation is that various documents enter the public domain. This is how we know about the tobacco industry's evil plans to target children, the fake academic journal that Elsevier created for Merck's marketing department, and so on. One of the most revealing documents ever to come out of a drug company emerged from an earlier quetiapine case: an email from John Tumas, publications manager at AstraZeneca.
Read article in the Guardian (UK)
Comment: In September 2004, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors published a statement claiming that from then on, its journals would only publish trials that were fully registered before they started. Theoretically, this should have made it more difficult for the results of drug trials to be buried. In practice, however, several years later, it turns out that fewer than half of all the trials that the editors published had been adequately registered, and more than a quarter were not registered at all. The fact that governments around the world have not acted to stop these criminal practices tells us everything we need to know about their ongoing collusion in the business with disease.

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

GMO News

August 14, 2010

Anniversary of a whistleblowing hero
Part 1
Twelve years ago, a 150-second TV broadcast changed our world; everyone everywhere owes a debt of gratitude to the man whose life it turned upside down—in his effort to protect ours. On August 10, 1998, eminent scientist Dr. Arpad Pusztai (pronounced Poos-tie) dared to speak the truth.
Read article at newswithviews.com
Comment: Pusztai had previously been an enthusiastic supporter of GM foods. But to his surprise, his experiments showed that GM foods were inherently dangerous. However, when he relayed his concerns during a short television interview in the UK, his career was squashed at the behest of shadowy forces in the GM industry and the British government. To visit his website, click here. To read a revealing interview with him that was published in the UK’s Guardian newspaper in 2008, click here.

For more GMO news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

August 19, 2010

Pesticide exposure in the womb could cause attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
Children whose mothers were exposed to certain types of pesticides while pregnant were more likely to have attention problems as they grew up, researchers claim. The study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, adds to evidence that some pesticides can affect the human brain.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

August 25, 2010

BP 'ignored concerns about oil well'
BP ignored the concerns of its contractor over the cementing of the Deepwater Horizon well shortly before it ruptured, a US hearing was told. Halliburton official Jesse Gagliano told US federal investigators in Houston, Texas, that he was at odds with the oil giant over the need for additional centralisers - devices used to help plug a well.
Read article in The Independent (UK)
Comment: The Gulf of Mexico oil spill is the largest oil spill in US history and was caused by British Petroleum (BP), a prominent member of the international Oil Cartel. To understand who benefits from this crisis, click here.

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website. Citizens of the UK can find additional UK-orientated news stories on the Reject the EU website.

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