Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

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Newsletter Archive

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July 23, 2010

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

July 13, 2010

Higher vitamin E intake tied to lower dementia risk
Older adults who get plenty of vitamin E in their diets may have a somewhat lower risk of developing dementia than those who consume less of the nutrient, a study published Monday suggests. Researchers found that among 5,400 Dutch adults age 55 and older, the one-third who reported the highest vitamin E intake from food were 25 percent less likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, over the next decade than the third with the lowest intakes.
Read Reuters news report at msnbc.com

July 13, 2010

Vitamin B6 may reduce rheumatoid arthritis inflammation
A daily dose of vitamin B6 may help to reduce inflammation associated with the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests.
Read article on the Arthritis Research UK website

July 13, 2010

Vitamin D may slash Parkinson’s risk: Study
High blood levels of vitamin D may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by 67 per cent, compared with low levels of the sunshine vitamin, says a new study from Finland.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 12, 2010

Osteoporosis Canada issues updated vitamin D guidelines for bone health
TORONTO - Osteoporosis Canada has released updated recommendations on how much vitamin D adults should be taking to keep their bones strong. The new guidelines, published in this week's edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, better reflect research findings about the so-called sunshine vitamin and what should be considered "adequate intake" and the "tolerable upper level."
Read article in the Winnipeg Free Press (Canada)
Comment: The new guidelines recommend daily vitamin D supplements of 400 to 1,000 international units (IUs) for adults under the age of 50 who do not have osteoporosis or conditions affecting the vitamin’s absorption. For adults over 50, with or without the bone-thinning disease, Dr. Bill Leslie, chair of Osteoporosis Canada’s scientific advisory council, says they should take between 800 and 2,000 IUs a day.

July 9, 2010

Fish oil may cut breast cancer risk
Postmenopausal women who take fish oil supplements for at least 10 years may be at less risk of developing breast cancer, according to the results of a recent report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Regular consumption of fish oil supplements, which contain high levels of the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, was linked with a 32 percent reduced risk of breast cancer concluded the observational study conducted at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 6, 2010

Creatine at low doses promotes resistance to fatigue, study
Low dose supplementation of creatine could help combat fatigue, according to the results of a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 5, 2010

Antioxidants do help arteries stay healthy: study
Long-term supplementation with dietary antioxidants has beneficial effects on sugar and fat metabolism, blood pressure and arterial flexibility in patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Nutrition and Metabolism report these positive results in a randomized controlled trial of combined vitamin C, vitamin E, coenzyme Q10 and selenium capsules.
Read article at physorg.com

July 5, 2010

High blood levels of vitamin E reduces risk of Alzheimer's
High levels of several vitamin E components in the blood are associated with a decreased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in advanced age, suggesting that vitamin E may help prevent cognitive deterioration in elderly people. This is the conclusion reached in a Swedish study published in the July 2010 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Read article at physorg.com

July 3, 2010

Pregnant women 'must take vitamin D supplements'
Pregnant women in the UK should be told to routinely take vitamin D supplements, researchers say. The team at University College London Institute of Child Health says official bodies currently offer conflicting advice. Writing in the British Journal of Nutrition, they say there is a "strong case" for a daily dose of vitamin D in pregnancy.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)
Comment: Dr Elina Hypponen, co-author of the paper, says that the routine provision of a daily supplement throughout pregnancy would significantly decrease the number of mothers who are vitamin D deficient, thus reducing related serious health risks to their babies.

July 1, 2010

Resveratrol Linked to Positive Impact on Pre-diabetes
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have linked resveratrol, a chemical compound found in red wine, to improved health of patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), also known as “pre-diabetes.” The results of the small pilot study presented at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) earlier this month showed promise. Among 10 patients with IGT given resveratrol supplements at concentrations higher than those normally found in wine, grapes or peanuts, all demonstrated lower post-meal glucose levels and improved insulin sensitivity - an encouraging outcome with potential implications for those with type 2 diabetes or at high risk for the condition.
Read article at physorg.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

July 14, 2010

SSRIs Render Unfriendly Skies
The SSRI antidepressant makers are desperate to find new customers, so they recently have been focusing on capturing groups for which the drugs were usually considered off limits. The latest marketing coup managed to open up sales to roughly 614,000 American pilots. Under a new policy announced on April 5, 2010, pilots diagnosed with depression can seek permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to take one of four SSRIs, including Eli Lilly's Prozac, Pfizer's Zoloft, and Forest Laboratories' Celexa and Lexapro. "The FAA should reverse its ruling before it's too late and hundreds of lives are lost when a pilot becomes impulsive, suicidal or violent--or just loses his sharpness--under the influence of antidepressant medication," said SSRI expert, Dr Peter Breggin, in an April 19, 2010 Huffington Post commentary.
Read article by Evelyn Pringle at opednews.com

July 14, 2010

F.D.A. Panel Votes to Restrict Avandia
A federal medical advisory panel recommended Wednesday that Avandia, a controversial diabetes drug, should either be withdrawn from the market or have sales severely restricted because it increases the risks of heart attacks.
Read article in the New York Times (USA)

July 13, 2010

Glaxo Said to Pay $460 Million to Settle Avandia Damage Suits
GlaxoSmithKline Plc agreed to pay about $460 million to resolve a majority of lawsuits alleging the company’s Avandia diabetes drug can cause heart attacks and strokes, people familiar with the accords said. Glaxo, the U.K.’s biggest drugmaker, agreed to settle about 10,000 suits for an average of at least $46,000 apiece, the people said. The company had been facing more than 13,000 suits alleging Glaxo hid the drug’s heart-attack risk, according to a UBS AG analyst. The settlements come as Glaxo is set to face its first Avandia trial in federal court in Philadelphia in October.
Read article at bloomberg.com

July 10, 2010

Ex-Regulator Said to Testify GlaxoSmithKline Withheld Study
A former U.S. Food and Drug Administration official said GlaxoSmithKline Plc withheld from regulators a study showing its Avandia diabetes drug may cause heart attacks, according to two people familiar with her deposition in a lawsuit against the drugmaker.
Read article at businessweek.com

July 6, 2010

Antidepressants in sea may damage food chain
Rising levels of antidepressants in coastal waters could change sea-life behaviour and potentially damage the food-chain, scientists said. Research into the behaviour of shrimps exposed to the antidepressant fluoxetine showed that their behaviour was dramatically affected.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

July 4, 2010

Ministers declare war on Britain's tranquilliser crisis
Decades of over-prescribing by GPs of drugs such as Valium have created 1.5 million 'involuntary addicts'
Ministers are poised to demand a dramatic reduction in the millions of tranquillisers prescribed in the UK every year, amid growing concerns about the long-term effects on patients who become addicted to them. A review of the problem of patient addiction – campaigners claim about 1.5 million people are affected – is expected to recommend a huge decrease in the availability of benzodiazepine tranquillisers, including Valium.
Read article in The Independent (UK)

June 28, 2010

Medically Caused Death in America
An Exclusive Interview With Barbara Starfield
The American health system, like clockwork, causes a mind-boggling number of deaths every year. The figures have been known for a decade. The story was covered briefly when a landmark study surfaced, and then it sank like a stone. The truth was inconvenient for many interests. That has not changed. “Medical coverage for all” is a banner that conceals ugly facts. On July 26, 2000, the US medical community received a titanic shock to the system, when one of its most respected public-health experts, Dr. Barbara Starfield, revealed her findings on healthcare in America.
Read article at newswithviews.com

June 18, 2010

Creating Disease: Big Pharma and Disease Mongering
You may think there is enough disease in the world already, and that no one would want to add to the diseases that we humans must deal with. But there is a powerful industry in our society that is working overtime to invent illnesses and to convince us we are suffering from them. This effort is known as "disease mongering," a term introduced by health-science writer Lynn Payer in her 1992 book Disease-Mongers: How Doctors, Drug Companies, and Insurers Are Making You Feel Sick. Payer defined disease mongering as "trying to convince essentially well people that they are sick, or slightly sick people that they are very ill." This strategy has also been called "the corporate construction of disease" by Ray Moynihan, Iona Heath and David Henry in the British Medical Journal. "There's a lot of money to be made from telling healthy people they're sick," they say. "Pharmaceutical companies are actively involved in sponsoring the definition of diseases and promoting them to both prescribers and consumers."
Read article by Larry Dossey, MD, in the Huffington Post (USA)

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

GMO News

July 8, 2010

European Commission proposals to ban GM crops: an empty and dangerous deal
New plans could open Europe’s fields to GM crops
New proposals due to be introduced in the coming days that are supposed to allow European countries more autonomy over the decision to ban genetically modified (GM) crops form an empty and potentially dangerous deal for member states, according to Friends of the Earth Europe. A new legal analysis of the proposals concluded that they were deeply flawed, legally and politically. Member states are being offered no additional powers to ban GM crops on health, environment and contamination impacts, despite these being the most serious and legally reliable grounds. Instead, only additional ethical grounds are offered, which are legally intangible, subjective and easily overturned in court.
In exchange for this empty offer to decide about the cultivation of GM crops on their territories the Commission is asking member states to relax opposition to future GMO applications for cultivation – fast tracking GMO approvals. Mute Schimpf, food campaigner for Friends of the Earth Europe said: “This is an empty deal that could open up Europe’s fields to unwanted and risky GM crops. Any country wanting to ban GM crops under these proposals will open themselves up to legal challenges from the biotech corporations who want to force GM crops into Europe.”
Read article on the Friends of the Earth Europe website

July 7, 2010

EU votes against compulsory GM food labelling
Campaigners angry at EU's decision to keep consumers 'in the dark' over food from animals given genetically modified (GM) feed
Consumers will continue to be none the wiser about whether they are eating food from animals raised on genetically-modified feed after MEPs voted against introducing a compulsory label rule. There is currently no requirement on the food industry to label meat or dairy products produced using GM animal feed, usually made from GM soya or maize. However, campaigners have argued that consumers should be given a choice about whether or not to buy such produce.
A recent poll commissioned by Friends of the Earth found that less than 40 per cent of the public was aware that GM was creeping onto their plates via imported GM cereals and protein crops fed to livestock in the UK. Almost 90 per cent of those surveyed wanted these products to be clearly labelled.
Read article in The Ecologist (UK)

July 7, 2010

GM-Spin Meltdown in China
Bt cotton in China is often cited as an example of a successful GM crop. In fact, its widespread use has merely replaced the cotton borer with a serious pest that not only attacks cotton but also many other crops.
Read article by Prof. Peter Saunders on the Institute of Science in Society (ISIS) website (UK)

For more GMO news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

July 16, 2010

Most people globally get insufficient Vit D
A health expert has said that more than half of the world’s population gets insufficient vitamin D.
Anthony Norman, a distinguished professor emeritus of biochemistry and biomedical sciences and an international expert on vitamin D, notes that half the people in North America and Western Europe get insufficient amounts of vitamin D. "Elsewhere, it is worse given that two-thirds of the people are vitamin D-insufficient or deficient. It is clear that merely eating vitamin D-rich foods is not adequate to solve the problem for most adults," said Norman.
Read article in The Times of India

July 13, 2010

EU urged to do more to cut chronic disease death toll
The EU has been urged to do more to help reduce "unnecessary" loss of life to chronic diseases. The demand, by an alliance of healthcare organisations, comes as new data shows the scale of the problem. The health professionals claim that chronic non-communicable diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, diabetes, kidney disease, cancers, respiratory and liver diseases, account for 86 per cent of deaths in Europe.
Read article at theparliament.com
Comment: The shocking statistics in this article bear testimony to the fact that the biggest obstacle to improving the health of the European population is the pharmaceutical investment industry. With total drug sales in Europe valued at around a quarter of a trillion dollars during 2009, and chronic non-communicable diseases now accounting for 86 per cent of European deaths, the people of the world have to face the facts: It is not in the financial interests of the pharmaceutical industry to prevent common diseases. Instead, the maintenance and expansion of diseases is a precondition for its financial growth. To learn about safe, natural therapies for the prevention and treatment of common diseases, visit the online library on the World Health Alphabetization website and our Worldwide Studies and Research page.

July 12, 2010

Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly
A research team from the Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, has established the first clear link between vitamin D deficiency and the development of cognitive problems that are a key feature of dementia. Findings from the study led by Dr. David J. Llewellyn are being published in the prestigious journal Archives of Internal Medicine, and are the result of an international collaboration involving researchers from the University of Michigan, the UK Medical Research Council Biostatistics Unit, the Perugia University Hospital and Medical School in Italy, and the US National Institute on Aging.
Read article at physorg.com

July 11, 2010

Manipulative Politics at Codex – Where Form Reigns Over Function
The Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) opened its 33rd session on Monday, July 5th, at the Centre International de Conferences in Geneva, with a full agenda of food-standard topics to be discussed. Except for those spells during which vice-chairmen ran the meeting for practice, the CAC Chairwoman Karen Hulebak steered the meeting down its bobsled course. First, though, she made her opening remarks to the assembled 200-plus delegates, admonishing them that they must remember that “we are here to protect the health of consumers and ensure fair trade in food.” She then bragged that “We are the most democratic and transparent food-standard setting body in the world.” But that was just the starting wind in her sails as she not only went on to quote Mother Theresa, but once again trundled out her theme that “Codex is always about science and about people and helping people.” Much to her displeasure, the National Health Federation would remind her of these words later.
Read article on the website of the National Health Federation (NHF) (USA)

July 7, 2010

Western food fuelling SE Asia diabetes boom: researchers
The growing popularity of Western junk food is fuelling a diabetes boom across Southeast Asia, Australian researchers warned on Wednesday.
Read article at physorg.com

July 7, 2010

The United States Needs 13 Million More Acres of Fruits and Vegetables to Meet the RDA
“We don’t produce enough fresh fruits and vegetables in the United States for everyone to eat a balanced and nutritious diet,” says Jon Scholl, President of American Farmland Trust (AFT). “In fact, it is estimated that we need at least another 13 million acres of farmland growing fruits and vegetables just for Americans to meet the minimum daily requirement of fruits and vegetables set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) 2005 dietary guidelines.”
Read press release on the American Farmland Trust website (USA)
Comment: As Scholl points out in this press release, this thought-provoking statistic is made even more poignant with the release of the USDA’s new Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, which calls for Americans to include even more fruits and vegetables into their diet. When one factors in the fact that the nutrient content of our food has fallen substantially over the past few decades, both in the US and worldwide, it is becomes clearer than ever that national healthcare policies urgently need to be revised to promote widespread dietary supplementation.

July 2, 2010

Supplement dialogue strengthens on Capitol Hill
The importance of dietary supplements in preventative healthcare has once more been highlighted to US health policy staffers, just weeks after the government announced more funds for the prevention of chronic diseases. At a Congressional briefing held on Capitol Hill last week, members of Congress and nutrition experts stressed that as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle, supplements can help maintain the health of Americans and reduce healthcare costs.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 2, 2010

Low vitamin D linked to metabolic syndrome in seniors
Insufficient and deficient levels of vitamin D may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome by about 40 percent, according to new findings.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 2, 2010

UK organic sector receives EU funds for promotions
The EU has agreed to match almost £1m funding raised by the UK organic sector to promote the benefits of organic food and farming to consumers over the next three years. The organic sector launched a campaign to draw pledges from organic groups and enterprises in the UK two years ago. The EU operates an annual scheme to match pledges from member states to promote the advantages of agricultural products hailing from the EU, and especially those with strong arguments for quality, hygiene, food safety, nutrition, labelling, animal welfare or environment-friendliness of their production. While other EU countries such as Italy, France and Denmark have received funding in the past, earlier bids from the UK, which were from individual organisations rather than industry-wide, were not accepted.
Read article at foodnavigator.com

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2009 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

July 15, 2010

EU to be given prominent UN role
The EU is to be given similar rights and powers to a fully fledged nation state in the United Nations general assembly. The proposals, following the introduction of the Lisbon Treaty and an increase in foreign policy power, will mean that Europe's desk will be moved from the margins, where it sits with organisations such as Nato's parliamentary body, near to the centre of the UN's assembly chamber. Baroness Ashton, the EU foreign minister or "High Representative", will be given a special seat alongside a new European UN ambassador with "the right to speak in a timely manner, the right of reply, the right to circulate documents, the right to make proposals and submit amendments (and) the right to raise points of order".
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: If the Oil and Drug Cartel that controls the Brussels EU gets its way, this latest development will become a stepping stone towards the cementing of its economic and political conquest of the world. Significantly, therefore, long before the Lisbon Treaty had even been drafted, the Cartel was already trying to export the political construct of the Brussels EU worldwide as a model to expand its control over other continents. As a result, for example, the architects of the African Union (AU) have not hidden the fact that the AU is being modeled on the European Union – with almost identical institutional structures, including a so-called “AU Commission.” Likewise, in 2009, leaders of East Asian countries announced that they had laid the groundwork for an EU-style bloc that will cover half the world’s population. These plans echoed similar proposals outlined by Australian prime Minister Kevin Rudd in 2008.

July 7, 2010

So Much for the European Project
Europe was supposed to have arrived. With the final approval of the Lisbon Treaty last year, the European Union sported a new, consolidated government. Europe's political elite believed it had answered Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's derisive question: what is the phone number for Europe? But continental politics remains chaotic and European nations are tottering economically. The European Union's future is now at risk. The question no longer is whether the EU can match the United States, but whether it can survive.
Read article by Doug Bandow in the American Spectator (USA)

June 30, 2010

Iraq inquiry: secret documents showing Tony Blair’s frustration published
Tony Blair’s irritation and frustration at being told that going to war in Iraq would be illegal have been made public with the unprecedented release of top secret Government documents. On one note, written six weeks before the March 2003 invasion, the then-prime minister scrawled “I just do not understand this” alongside a warning from Lord Goldsmith, the attorney general, that military force would be illegal without a fresh United Nations resolution.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

June 30, 2010

Diplomat questions Blair's handling of Bush in runup to Iraq war
Lord Jay tells Chilcot inquiry Tony Blair gave commitments to US president about British involvement
Britain's senior diplomat at the time of the Iraq war has questioned how Tony Blair conducted his dealings with the then US president, George W Bush, in the runup to the conflict, during this morning's session at the Chilcot inquiry in central London. Lord Jay of Ewelme, who was head of the Foreign Office as permanent secretary there between 2002 and 2006, told the inquiry that the former prime minister gave commitments about Britain's support for the war in advance that he would not have given himself. His evidence also disclosed that there was internal debate and conflict within the Foreign Office about the legality of the war and that its senior legal advisers were strongly opposed to the conflict without a second UN resolution.
Read article in the Guardian (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website. Citizens of the UK can find additional UK-orientated news stories on the Reject the EU website.

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