Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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July 31, 2009

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

July 28, 2009

High-dose, short-term folate may cut blood pressure
A short-term, high-dose supplementation period with folate may reduce blood pressure, and improve other cardiovascular measures, suggests a small study from Italy. Fifteen post-menopausal women received a daily dose of 15 mg of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the naturally circulating form of folate, for three weeks, and experienced an average drop in systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 4.5 and 5.3 mmHg, respectively.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 28, 2009

Intense exercise may cut risk of cancer death: study
Men who regularly do heart-pounding exercise are less likely to develop cancer, according to a study released Tuesday. The study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found that the key factor in the reduced risk of cancer was a higher rate of oxygen consumption.
Read AFP news report at google.com

July 22, 2009

Potassium supplement may ease epileptic kidney issues
A daily supplement of potassium citrate may prevent painful kidney stones developing in epileptics adhering to a high-fat ketogenic diet, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 20, 2009

Multivitamins may lower heart disease death risk
Long-term regular consumption of a multivitamin may reduce the risk of dying from heart disease by 16 per cent, according to a new study from the US. Intakes of vitamin E over 215 milligrams per day over the course of ten years were also associated with a 28 per cent reduction in the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to findings published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 17, 2009

Daily dose of baking soda ‘can keep kidney patients off dialysis’
A daily dose of baking soda could help patients with chronic kidney disease avoid having to undergo dialysis, a study suggests. Research by British scientists has found that sodium bicarbonate — otherwise known as baking soda — can dramatically slow the progress of the condition.
Read article in The Times (UK)
Comment: Magdi Yaqoob, the professor who led the study, described its results as “amazing”, adding that: “Baking soda is not classed as a drug so this study has never been tried before.” In reality, of course, the fact that a study using baking soda - a natural, non-patentable substance costing only cents per day - has not been tried before in patients with chronic kidney disease is hardly surprising. The 773 billion dollar annual sales of the pharmaceutical industry result from the fact that its synthetic chemical drug medicines, including those for chronic kidney disease, can be patented. Patents essentially allow manufacturers to arbitrarily define the profits for their drugs. Therapies based upon safe and affordable natural substances, such as baking soda, on the other hand, threaten the drug business because they can’t be patented. To read this study’s abstract, and access its full text, click here.

July 7, 2009

Vitamin D may help prevent knee osteoarthritis
Low levels of vitamin D are associated with the loss of cartilage in the knee joint of older individuals, researchers in Australia report. "Cartilage loss is the hallmark of osteoarthritis," Dr. Changhai Ding told Reuters Health. By the time patients reach the point of needing knee replacement, 60 percent of cartilage has been lost, he said. However, "achieving vitamin D sufficiency in osteoarthritis patients could significantly delay total knee replacement," said Ding, at the Menzies Research Institute in Tasmania.
Read article at chiroeco.com

July 6, 2009

Folate linked to lower colorectal cancer risk: Study
Increased intakes of folate from the diet may reduce a woman’s risk of colorectal cancer by about 50 per cent, according to new findings from Korea.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

July 6, 2009

Component of vegetable protein may be linked to lower blood pressure
Consuming an amino acid commonly found in vegetable protein may be associated with lower blood pressure, researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers found that a 4.72 percent higher dietary intake of the amino acid glutamic acid as a percent of total dietary protein correlated with lower group average systolic blood pressure, lower by 1.5 to 3.0 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Group average diastolic blood pressure was lower by 1.0 to 1.6 mm Hg.
Read article at physorg.com

July 1, 2009

Study: Honey can kill superbugs
Honey has been used to treat wounds since ancient times, but recent years have seen a surge of medical interest in the sticky stuff. Manuka honey has been the subject of particular interest, with the results of a study just published by Sydney University finding that it has powerful antibacterial properties, and is even effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Associate Professor Dee Carter, from Sydney University's School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences said: "Our research is the first to clearly show that these honey-based products could in many cases replace antibiotic creams on wounds and equipment such as catheters.
Read article at cnn.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

July 27, 2009

Antipsychotic drugs associated with high blood sugar in older adults with diabetes
Older patients with diabetes who take antipsychotic medications appear to have an increased risk of hospitalization for hyperglycemia (elevated blood glucose level), especially soon after beginning treatment, according to a report in the July 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. An increasing number of older adults are being prescribed antipsychotic drugs for dementia and other conditions, according to background information in the article. However, these medications may be associated with adverse effects—including Parkinson's disease symptoms, stroke and diabetes—in the older population.
Read article at physorg.com

July 16, 2009

Drug firms settle Vytorin complaints
NEW YORK - Merck & Co. and Schering-Plough Corp. have agreed to pay $5.4 million to 35 states to settle allegations that they delayed releasing negative findings from a study of their cholesterol fighter Vytorin, the drug makers said yesterday.
Read article in the Boston Globe (USA)

July 15, 2009

Drug firm offered posters to Arroyo’
MANILA, Philippines — A party-list representative said that the pharmaceutical firm Pfizer also offered to produce promotional posters of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and Health Secretary Francisco Duque III. Citing confidential sources, Akbayan Rep. Risa Hontiveros-Baraquel on Wednesday said this was on top of the five million discount cards it proposed to give the government in exchange for not implementing sections of the law on affordable medicines. Baraquel said the posters were part of the offer Pfizer had made to the government in a purported attempt to derail the implementation of an order that would forbid its discount card program.
Read article in the Philippine Daily Inquirer

July 9, 2009

Dry mouth linked to prescription and over the counter drugs
Approximately ninety-one percent of dentists say patients complaining about dry mouth are taking multiple medications, according to a nationwide member survey conducted by the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). Dry mouth, or xerostomia, is caused by a decrease in salivary function. It affects approximately one in four Americans, placing more than 25 percent of people at risk for tooth decay.
Read article at physorg.com

July 1, 2009

Acid-reducing medicines may lead to dependency
Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for eight weeks induces acid-related symptoms like heartburn, acid regurgitation and dyspepsia once treatment is withdrawn in healthy individuals, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The marketplace for the pharmaceutical industry is the human body – but only for as long as the body hosts diseases. Thus, maintaining and expanding diseases is a precondition for the industry’s growth. In other words: patients becoming “hooked” on their drugs is good for business.

July 1, 2009

FDA requires Chantix, Zyban to have warning
The Food and Drug Administration will require two smoking-cessation drugs, Chantix and Zyban, to carry the agency's strongest safety warning over side effects including depression and suicidal thoughts.
Read article at physorg.com

June 30, 2009

Painkiller Restrictions Urged Because of Threat of Liver Damage
The prescription painkillers Percocet and Vicodin should be banned and use of Tylenol, sold over the counter, should be reduced because the ingredient acetaminophen is linked to liver damage, U.S. advisers said. Outside advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted 20-17 today in Adelphi, Maryland, for the ban on Percocet and Vicodin, which also contain a narcotic.
Read article at bloomberg.com

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

GMO News

July 27, 2009

GM crops being grown in Britain
Genetically-modified crops are being grown in Britain for the first time in a year after controversial trials of the plants were "secretly" restarted. Cultivation of a field of potatoes designed to be resistant to pests were abandoned over a year ago when environmental protesters ripped up the crop. But, without alerting the public as is usual when such trials begin, the project has been restarted, prompting environmental groups to warn that local farms and nearby residents could be put at risk.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

July 15, 2009

Canada Settles a Crop Trade Complaint Against Europe
Canada settled a trade dispute with Europe on Wednesday that will lead to the country dropping its six-year-old complaint at the World Trade Organization over European restrictions on imports of genetically modified food. The European Union trade commissioner, Catherine Ashton, said she hoped to reach similar agreements with Argentina and the United States, bringing an end to one of the most contentious recent cases in trans-Atlantic trade policy.
Read article in the New York Times (USA)

July 5, 2009

Malta stands firm against GMOs, pushes for nationalisation of GMO regulation
In a recent meeting of the EU’s Environment Council, Austria, supported by 12 other countries including Malta, submitted a note proposing the way forward on the legislation dealing with genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agriculture – a source of ongoing bioethics debates. The use of GMOs in agriculture is one of the rare subjects of EU legislation where no qualified majority has been achieved within the EU Council in recent years. By way of the proposal, submitted during the 25 June Environment Council meeting, the 13 member states are calling for the authorisation process for GMO cultivation to be revisited, so that it will become the right of each individual country to decide whether to restrict or prohibit the cultivation of authorised GMOs in its territory. The Austrian proposal is being supported by Bulgaria, Ireland, Greece, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, The Netherlands, Poland and Slovenia.
Read article on the Malta Independent Online website (Malta)

July 3, 2009

GMO corn: France rejects report by EU food agency
France on Friday rejected a report by the European Union's food safety watchdog that said a controversial strain of genetically-modified corn was safe. In a joint statement, the French ecology and agriculture ministries said the Italy-based European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) had failed to take into account requests to change the way it evaluated the risk.
Read AFP news report at google.com

June 24, 2009

U.S. court cuts off appeals in Monsanto alfalfa case
A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday left in place an injunction barring Monsanto Co from selling its Roundup Ready alfalfa seed until the government completes an environmental impact study on how the genetically modified product could affect neighboring crops. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the company's request for a rehearing of its appeal and said it would accept no more petitions for rehearing in the three-year-old case.
Read news report at reuters.com

For more GMO news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

July 28, 2009

Common household pesticides linked to childhood cancer cases in Washington area
A new study by researchers at the Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center finds a higher level of common household pesticides in the urine of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a cancer that develops most commonly between three and seven years of age. The findings are published in the August issue of the journal Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.
Read article at physorg.com

July 28, 2009

Trade liberalization linked to obesity in Central America
Since trade liberalization between Central and North America, imports and availability of processed, high-fat and high-sugar foods have increased dramatically. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Globalization and Health link this influx of American junk food to a 'nutrition transition' in Central American countries, with a growing burden diet-related chronic disease.
Read article at physorg.com

July 16, 2009

Study breaks down supplement use by physicians
The majority of physicians and nurses in the US recommend supplements to their patients but also use them personally, finds a new study. Commissioned by the supplement trade group Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) and published in the peer-reviewed Nutrition Journal, the study surveyed 900 physicians and 277 nurses.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 16, 2009

Be aware of vitamin D insufficiency, says US Dermatology Academy
In an update to its position statement on Vitamin D, the American Academy of Dermatology has cautioned that some individuals may be at risk of “insufficiency”, and may therefore need to consume higher doses of the vitamin.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

July 13, 2009

Pesticide levels in blood linked to Parkinson's disease
People with Parkinson's disease have significantly higher blood levels of a particular pesticide than healthy people or those with Alzheimer's disease, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. In a study appearing in the July issue of Archives of Neurology, researchers found the pesticide beta-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) in 76 percent of people with Parkinson's, compared with 40 percent of healthy controls and 30 percent of those with Alzheimer's.
Read article at physorg.com

July 10, 2009

Do You Want To Feel Good, Or Do You Want The Truth?
See The Bullies For What They Really Are
It began with an e-mail from out of the blue. From someone I had known – or thought I had known – for 40 years. “I heard you on the Gary Null Show,” it essentially began, innocently enough, “and you were saying that the National Health Federation is the only voice of health freedom at Codex.” So far, so good. “But we cannot get our own seat at Codex and the Chairman told us that you had to let us sit with you, so we are demanding that you give us a place with you or else we will do whatever we can to take away your Codex seat.”
Read press release on the website of the National Health Federation (NHF) (USA)

July 7, 2009

New Bill (HR2749) Gives FDA Unheard-of Power over Small Farmers, Food and Supplement Producers
A new, long-awaited food safety bill is now before the US House of Representatives. It is the Food Safety Enhancement Act of 2009, or FSEA. Introduced by Reps. Henry Waxman (D–CA) and John Dingell (D–MI), the FSEA is meant to address food safety concerns. But as you will see, much of it is not about food safety at all. Food safety issues have arisen from large agricultural operations. But this bill places its harshest burdens on small food producers and supplement producers.
Read article on the American Association for Health Freedom (AAHF) website (USA)

June 26, 2009

Movie, 'Food, Inc.' Chews Up Monsanto, Agribusiness Cousins
The movie "Food, Inc." begins in the aisles of a grocery store, then eventually makes its way through Southern chicken coops, western feedlots and Indiana cornfields. The film ventures into hog slaughterhouses, through the hallways of Congress and to a celebrated farm in Virginia, exploring how food makes its way to American dining tables and skewering the industrialized food system along the way. It's not a scenic drive. The documentary attempts to demonstrate that the food Americans eat is largely controlled by a handful of corporations -- and all at the expense of the environment, human health and the economic well-being of farmers.
Read article at soyatech.com
Comment: To watch a trailer for the movie, click here.

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

July 28, 2009

EP opinion poll analyses 2009 European election turnout
Parliament has published a Eurobarometer survey of 26 830 people across Europe carried out in the month following the 4-7 June European elections. Citizens were asked about their reasons for choosing whether or not to vote, and, if they did vote, what factors they took into account in deciding which party to vote for. Overall turnout in the elections was down compared with the 2004 elections by 2.47 percentage points, a smaller decline than in the past. This overall figure masks major national variations, with turnout up in eight Member States, about the same in a further eight, moderately lower in seven countries and markedly lower in four Member States.
Read press release on the European Parliament website
Comment: This press release from the European Parliament dramatically understates the way in which the people of Europe used the 2009 election to signal their rejection of the EU, as almost 60 percent of the people who were eligible to vote deliberately abstained. In addition, however, a further 4 percent of the eligible electorate cast deliberate votes against the EU by voting for parties that are anti-EU and/or opposed to the Lisbon Treaty. To learn more, click here.

July 20, 2009

EU parliament blocks whistleblower's bid for key budget post
MEPs have blocked the whistle blowing former European commission accountant Marta Andreasen's bid to become a vice-chair of the assembly's budgetary control committee. The parliament's EPP and socialist groups joined forces on Monday to form a blocking majority in the budgetary control committee to reject Andreasen, who was sacked in 2004 as the EU’s chief accountant after exposing irregular accounting practices. Following a secret ballot, where Andreasen picked up nine of the committee's 29 votes, the Argentinian-born Spaniard, a newly elected MEP and treasurer of the anti-federalist United Kingdom Independence Party (Ukip) said the decision to block her was, "not a good start for this committee." She told theparliament.com that, "Today's secret vote is a measure of how much they fear me. My priority will always be transparency and accountability in public funds …this move shows neither."
Read article at theparliament.com

July 19, 2009

Calls for probe into Dr. Kelly's 'suicide'
A US Air Force linguist joins a host of doctors in demanding a new probe into the mysterious death of a British scientist and weapons expert who opposed the Iraq war. The controversy surrounding Dr. David Kelly's death was first rekindled following a Daily Express report in June that revealed the expert was in the middle of writing a book containing damaging government secrets on the Iraq war as well as biological warfare in apartheid South Africa. The linguist, Mai Pederson, who was part of Kelly's weapons inspection team in Iraq, has called on the Attorney General for England, Wales and Northern Ireland to carry out an 'independent' review of the case, reported the Mail on Sunday.
Read article on the Press TV website (Iran)

July 15, 2009

Tony Blair is candidate for EU president says UK Europe minister
Former Labour MEP Glenys Kinnock says ex-UK prime minister Tony Blair is Britain's candidate for president of the European council. The new UK Europe minister told journalists in Strasbourg the UK was supporting Blair for the post which will be created if and when the stalled Lisbon treaty comes into effect. Along with the commission president, it will be one of the most powerful posts in the EU.
Read article at theparliament.com

July 6, 2009

Brussels Put Firmly in the Back Seat
Last week's ruling by the German Constitutional Court, coupled with demands by one conservative party for changes to the constitution, may not only jeopardize Berlin's schedule for the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The Karlsruhe ruling also threatens future steps toward European integration.
Read article in Der Spiegel (Germany)
Comment: This excellent article analyzing the implications of the German Constitutional Court’s ruling on the Lisbon Treaty is a must-read for anybody still labouring under the impression that the European Union is a democracy. The European Parliament, as the German judges clearly state, is terminally undemocratic. However, the court’s ruling does not merely threaten Berlin's schedule for the ratification of the treaty: it also further erodes the very credibility of the “Brussels EU” itself. For further analysis, from an Irish perspective, describing how the judgment fundamentally changes the situation regarding the treaty, read Bruce Arnold’s insightful article in the Irish Independent by clicking here.

July 5, 2009

Kelly’s Book Of Secrets
Weapons inspector David Kelly was writing a book exposing highly damaging government secrets before his mysterious death. He was intending to reveal that he warned Prime Minister Tony Blair there were no weapons of mass destruction anywhere in Iraq weeks before the British and American invasion. He had several discussions with a publisher in Oxford and was seeking advice on how far he could go without breaking the law on secrets. Following his death, his computers were seized and it is still not known if any rough draft was discovered by investigators and, if so, what happened to the material. Dr Kelly was also intending to lift the lid on a potentially bigger scandal, his own secret dealings in germ warfare with the apartheid regime in South Africa.
Read article in the Daily Express (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

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