Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

If you would like to receive our newsletters regularly, please click here or send us an email to the following address: info@dr-rath-foundation.org

June 19, 2009

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

June 12, 2009

Vitamin D linked to successful weight loss with dieting
Increased intakes of vitamin D may improve weight loss while following a calorie-restricted diet, according to new findings from the US.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 9, 2009

Vitamins C, D pack powerful budget-friendly punch
Regular doses help ward off heart disease, cancer, diabetes
Two well-known, affordable, and accessible vitamins have long been touted as being the means to a healthier body and boosted immunity to colds. Expanded research is also proving that regular doses of Vitamins C and D will also help treat and prevent diseases such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes, osteoarthritis and even multiple sclerosis.
Read article in the Vancouver Sun (Canada)

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

June 14, 2009

The WHO's askew flu fears
How bizarre! The World Health Organization has declared swine flu a "pandemic," signaling governments worldwide to launch emergency response plans. The mildest pandemics of the 20th century killed at least a million people worldwide, according to the WHO's data, while old-fashioned seasonal flu strikes every nation yearly and kills an estimated 250,000 to 500,000. As of Thursday, when the pandemic was declared, H1N1 swine flu had killed only 144 people total -- fewer than succumb daily to seasonal flu annually. And in Mexico, where the outbreak began and where it has been the most severe, cases peaked quickly, in just four weeks.
Read article in the Los Angeles Times (USA)

June 7, 2009

Child’s death a tragic destiny
Destiny Hager could be delightfully charming and frightfully aggressive. In her darkest moments, the 3-year-old smashed her head against walls, lashed out at family members and bit herself. She battled insomnia. Her mood swings were sharp. She tried to suffocate a dog. Her condition demanded intervention. Counselors directed Destiny and her parents, Angela and Greg Hager, to Prairie View hospital in Newton. Vernon Kliewer, a child psychiatrist in whom the Hagers placed trust but now condemn, prescribed two powerful drugs to control Destiny. The tiny girl with shoulder-length brown hair was tranquilized by the medical regimen. But the Hagers were uncomfortable with dosages obliterating Destiny’s personality. They scheduled a doctor’s visit to wean her from medication. Destiny began complaining of a stomachache three days before the appointment. Her pain appeared to ease, but it later mushroomed. She was raced to a hospital. Her anguished cries echo in Angela’s memory. “The sound of it stays with me every day,” she said. “If you can picture a wounded animal in a trap trying to free itself, that’s what she sounded like.” Destiny died within hours.
Read article in the Topeka Capital-Journal (Kansas, USA)

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

June 16, 2009

MS march to shine light on need for vitamin supplement
Campaigners were set to go on the march in Edinburgh today calling for the widespread introduction of a vitamin D supplement in a move they saw could save thousands of Scottish lives. Up to 1000 people were set to walk from the Castle down the Royal Mile towards parliament to demand more action to reduce cases of multiple sclerosis. Scientists have suggested if more people in this country – who are deprived of natural vitamin D from sunlight – were to be given the boost, the high rates of MS could be cut by 80 per cent. The march has been organised by 14-year-old Ryan McLaughlin, from Glasgow, whose mother has been crippled by the illness.
Read article at scotsman.com (Scotland/UK)

June 16, 2009

Cancer boost from whole carrots
The anti-cancer properties of carrots are more potent if the vegetable is not cut up before cooking, research shows. Scientists found "boiled before cut" carrots contained 25% more of the anti-cancer compound falcarinol than those chopped up first.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)
Comment: Lead researcher Dr Kirsten Brandt, from Newcastle University's School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, explained: "Chopping up your carrots increases the surface area so more of the nutrients leach out into the water while they are cooked. "By keeping them whole and chopping them up afterwards you are locking in nutrients and the taste, so the carrot is better for you all round." Logically, therefore, it would seem that this same principle may also apply to the cooking of other vegetables as well.

June 16, 2009

Congressional briefing positions supplements as preventative healthcare
Dietary supplements are key to the prevention of a number of health conditions, and as such they would form a cost-effective approach to healthcare reform, Congress heard in a recent briefing.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

June 12, 2009

Venezuela Orders End to Coca-Cola Zero Production
On Wednesday the Venezuelan Ministry for Health ordered the Coca-Cola Company to remove its product Coca-Cola Zero from sale for containing a cancerous ingredient, sodium cyclamate, an ingredient not included in the US version of the drink. Jesus Mantilla, the health minister, said, "The product should stop circulating in order to protect the health of Venezuelans." He said the product contains sodium cyclamate, which in large amounts can be harmful, and then announced that the product should be recalled, destroyed, and not produced anymore.
Read article at venezuelanalysis.com

June 12, 2009

Individuals who apply pesticides are found to have double the risk of blood disorder
A study involving 678 individuals who apply pesticides, culled from a U.S. Agricultural Health Study of over 50,000 farmers, recently found that exposure to certain pesticides doubles one's risk of developing an abnormal blood condition called MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) compared with individuals in the general population. The disorder, characterized by an abnormal level of a plasma protein, requires lifelong monitoring as it is a pre-cancerous condition that can lead to multiple myeloma, a painful cancer of the plasma cells in the bone marrow.
Read article at physorg.com

June 10, 2009

Hampshire MPs pledge to put water fluoridation on hold in Southampton
Yesterday, opponents of fluoridation met in Westminster to discuss the South Central Strategic Health Authority’s decision to fluoridate the water supplies of nearly 200,000 people in the Southampton and South West Hampshire area. Campaigners from Hampshire Against Fluoride were able to cite 15,348 objections to the fluoridation plan from the local area. Lone pro-fluoridation proponent, Alan Whitehead, surprised the meeting, saying that he agrees with fellow pro-fluoride Southampton Labour MP John Denham that the decision to fluoridate should be put on hold until public confidence has been restored.
Read press release on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)
Comment: After the meeting, three UK/Irish non-governmental organizations - the Alliance for Natural Health, the National Pure Water Association and Voice of Irish Concern for the Environment (VOICE) - committed themselves to collaborating with a view to exploring the potential of a legal challenge as a means of halting deliberate fluoridation of the public water supply in both the UK and Ireland.

June 10, 2009

OA publisher accepts fake paper
An open access journal has agreed to publish a nonsensical article written by a computer program, claiming that the manuscript was peer reviewed and requesting that the "authors" pay $800 in "open access fees." Philip Davis, a PhD student in scientific communications at Cornell University, and Kent Anderson, executive director of international business and product development at the New England Journal of Medicine, submitted the fake manuscript to The Open Information Science Journal (TOISCIJ) at the end of January.
Read NewsBlog entry at the-scientist.com
Comment: Davis and Anderson say this episode points out potentially serious flaws in the open-access, author-pay model being adopted by an increasing number of publishers. Open access journals generally charge authors fees to publish research papers. With institutional libraries, including Cornell's, and granting institutions, such as the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, offering to pay open access publication fees for faculty authors and grantees, the potential for abuse may be increasing.

June 8, 2009

EFSA defends controversial sweetener aspartame (again)
ANH's Rob Verkerk PhD and Sophie Middleton investigate the European Food Safety Authority's second clearance of aspartame, in the wake of long-term studies on developing rats by a prestigious European research institute which showed that aspartame causes cancer.
Read article on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

June 15, 2009

Outcry over Government's decision to hold Iraq war inquiry in secret
Gordon Brown ran into fresh trouble today as he announced that the long-awaited Iraq war inquiry would be held in secret.
Read article in The Times (UK)
Comment: A study conducted by the prestigious British polling group, Opinion Research Business (ORB), suggests that more than one million Iraqi citizens have been murdered since the U.S. and U.K invasion in 2003. As such, we can only conclude that by deciding to hold this inquiry in private, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown is attempting to cover up evidence that the perpetrators of this war are guilty of war crimes.

June 15, 2009

Food For Thought: Gordon Brown as the EU’s First Full-Time President?
José Manuel Barroso is all but certain to be reappointed as European Commission president. But who will get the other plum European Union jobs that will soon be up for grabs? The most startling suggestion I have heard in recent days - and it came from a high-ranking EU diplomat - is that the EU’s first ever full-time president could be none other than Prime Minister Gordon Brown of the UK.
Read Tony Barber's blog entry on the Financial Times website (UK)
Comment: In our opinion, Brown may have been promised the job if he agrees to wait until the Lisbon Treaty has been fully ratified by all 27 EU countries before calling the UK’s next general election. Barring exceptional circumstances, the latest date he can hold this is Thursday 3 June 2010. Although Britain has already ratified the treaty, Brown’s major worry is that the main opposition party in Britain might hold a referendum on it if it is elected to power and the treaty has not yet been fully ratified in all 27 EU countries. As things stand, four countries - Ireland, the Czech Republic, Poland and Germany - have yet to ratify the treaty. In the Czech Republic, the parliament has passed it but President Vaclav Klaus has refused to sign it, as also has President Lech Kaczynski in Poland. As long as they hold out, the treaty cannot come into force. In Germany, meanwhile, the treaty's fate currently hangs on a Court Ruling. Latest reports suggest that Ireland will have its second referendum on the treaty in late September or early October and that the EU now sees the UK, not Ireland, as the greatest threat to its full and final ratification.

June 10, 2009

EU security proposals are 'dangerously authoritarian'
The European Union is stepping up efforts to build an enhanced pan-European system of security and surveillance which critics have described as “dangerously authoritarian”. Civil liberties groups say the proposals would create an EU ID card register, internet surveillance systems, satellite surveillance, automated exit-entry border systems operated by machines reading biometrics and risk profiling systems.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

Back to the Newsletter Archive…