Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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January 23, 2009

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

January 15, 2009

Carotenoids may boost bone health: Study
Antioxidant pigments from plants may protect against bone loss in older men and women, according to a new study funded by the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service. An increased intake of carotenoids, and particularly lycopene, was associated with some level of protection against losses in bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine in women and at the hip in men, according to data published in this month’s American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 13, 2009

Vitamin C may improve blood pressure: Study
High intakes of vitamin C may protect against blood pressure increases in young women, according to a new study from the US. Researchers, led by Gladys Block from the University of California, Berkeley, report that a one mg per decilitre increase in blood vitamin C levels was linked to a 4.1 and 4.0 mmHg in systolic and diastolic blood pressures.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 13, 2009

Adequate vitamin D can prevent diabetes
Diabetes can be prevented, and the disease’s complications for those diagnosed with it reduced, through adequate intake of vitamin D, says a report.
Read article in The Times of India

January 7, 2009

L-carnitine may boost heart health of diabetics
Supplements of L-carnitine may reduce the oxidation of LDL cholesterol in diabetics, indicating significant potential to boost heart health, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 6, 2009

Sunlight could stop short-sightedness
A spreading pandemic of myopia among the world’s urban children may be avoided if children spend at least two to three hours each day outdoors. Australian scientists from The Vision Centre say there is persuasive evidence that increased exposure to daylight can prevent the permanent short-sightedness and eye damage which now afflicts up to 80-90 per cent of children in cities in East Asia such as Singapore and Hong Kong.
Read article at physorg.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

January 15, 2009

Study Confirms Antipsychotics Pose Heart Risk
Latest Generation of Drugs Provides No Safety Advantage; Warning on Children, Elderly
Patients taking the latest generation of antipsychotic drugs are twice as likely to suffer sudden cardiac failure and death as nonusers, according to a new study that found such medicines are no safer than the older ones they have largely replaced. Though the health risks of antipsychotic drugs for elderly patients have been previously documented, the study, published in this week's New England Journal of Medicine, was one of the largest to date, and it found dangers for younger adults, too. The study's findings add to a growing body of research questioning the safety, cost and effectiveness of so-called atypical antipsychotic drugs.
Read article in the Wall Street Journal (USA)

January 13, 2009

HRT drugs can shrink brain
Common forms of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can shrink the brains of post-menopausal women. The discovery, reported in the journal Neurology, may explain earlier findings associating HRT with an increased risk of memory loss and dementia.
Read article at scotman.com (Scotland/UK)

January 9, 2009

Chemical coshes 'double the chance of Alzheimer's patients dying'
Drugs used as a "chemical cosh" to placate Alzheimer's patients in care homes double their chance of dying, a new study has shown. Patients given a placebo were almost twice as likely to be alive after three years as those on the antipsychotic drugs.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

January 8, 2009

FDA Scientists Ask Obama to Restructure Drug Agency
A group of scientists at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday sent a letter to President-elect Barack Obama's transition team pleading with him to restructure the agency, saying managers have ordered, intimidated and coerced scientists to manipulate data in violation of the law.
Read article in the Wall Street Journal (USA)

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

January 21, 2009

EU reviews vitamin limits after Irish petition
Restrictive vitamin supplement standards due to be set by the EU are to be re-examined following an Irish petition. The standards, introduced by EU directive, would restrict doses of vitamin D to the equivalent of that produced by 25 seconds of sunlight and prevent the sale of high-dose vitamin C products without prescription. The EU food supplements directive was given the go-ahead in 2005. However, the maximum permitted levels of ingredients to be contained in supplements has not yet been set. The standards currently being considered would restrict the sale of vitamins and minerals to very low doses. It would become illegal to sell vitamin A in a dose that can be found in more than half a carrot or to sell selenium, an important mineral, in doses larger than in a quarter of a Brazil nut.
Read article in the Irish Times (Ireland)

January 21, 2009

Ray of sunlight from ANH/Irish efforts in Brussels
On Monday, the Irish Association of Health Stores (IAHS) defended its petition in the European Parliament against the European Commission’s planned setting of EU-wide maximum limits for dosages of vitamins and minerals in food supplements. The petition, submitted originally in December 2007 with the support of 60,000 Irish citizens, claims that measures to harmonise maximum levels of vitamin and mineral food supplements under the Food Supplements Directive (2002/46/EC)—soon to be implemented by the European Commission—will unduly impact consumers, health stores and practitioners in Ireland. Instead of being closed down, the apparent goal of the European Commission, the European Parliament’s Petitions Committee chairman insisted that the petition be kept open.
Read press release on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)

January 14, 2009

Low selenium levels may increase anaemia risk in the elderly
Low levels of the mineral selenium may increase the risk of anaemia in older people, according to a new study from the United States. Writing in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the National Institute on Aging report that people with the lowest selenium levels were 11.4 per cent more likely to have anaemia, compared to people with the highest levels.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

January 13, 2009

Herbals are mainstream - change needed, says WSJ opinion
Health academics from leading US universities have published an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal maintaining that alternative medicine, including herbals, must be part of President-elect Barack Obama’s health plan. The authors argue that changes in lifestyle and diet would save lives and dollars in a nation increasingly affected by chronic diseases and crippling healthcare costs.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: To read the Wall Street Journal opinion piece, click here.

January 13, 2009

Toxic pesticides banned in Europe
Sharp restrictions on the use of pesticides, passed by the European Parliament on Tuesday (13 January), will see the use of a number of highly toxic chemicals within pesticides banned and pesticide use severely reduced.
Read article at euobserver.com
Comment: Although these restrictions are clearly an important step in the right direction, some of the most dangerous pesticides – and methods of administering them – have not yet been banned completely. For example, if plants are deemed to be “at serious risk”, the use of substances that cause cancer, endanger reproduction or our genes, or that negatively affect our nervous, immune or hormonal systems, may still be approved for up to five years. Similarly, aerial crop spraying will still be permitted under some circumstances. Bear in mind too that the use of numerous other pesticides not affected by these restrictions will continue to be permitted.

January 12, 2009

Top 11 compounds in US drinking water
A comprehensive survey of the drinking water for more than 28 million Americans has detected the widespread but low-level presence of pharmaceuticals and hormonally active chemicals.
Read article at newscientist.com
Comment: The drugs found include beta-blockers; drugs used to treat bipolar disorder; anti-cholesterol drugs; tranquilisers; painkiller and anti-inflammatory drugs; anticonvulsants; antibiotics; and others. Similar findings have been made in other countries. In the UK, for example, powerful cancer and psychiatric drugs have been found in tap water, leading doctors to express concern about exposing pregnant women to drugs that could harm an unborn child. For further information about how pharmaceutical drugs contaminate drinking water, click here.

January 11, 2009

Fat linked to vitamin deficiency
Teenage girls and young women who are overweight have a higher chance of being deficient in vitamin D, scientists have found in research that strengthens the case for wider use of supplements. The research shows that even in a sunshine-rich climate similar to Sydney's it is possible for young people to lack the essential vitamin, which the body usually produces from sun exposure.
Read article in the Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

January 15, 2009

Big Brother database a 'terrifying' assault on traditional freedoms
Plans condemned as the greatest threat to civil rights for decades
Sweeping new powers allowing personal information about every citizen to be handed over to government agencies faced condemnation yesterday amid warnings that Britain is experiencing the greatest threats to civil rights for decades. Shami Chakrabarti, the director of the pressure group Liberty, warned that the laws, published yesterday, were among a string of measures that amounted to a "terrifying" assault on traditional freedoms.
Read article in The Independent (UK)

January 14, 2009

UK opposition leader vows Lisbon referendum
David Cameron, the leader of the opposition Conservative party in Britain, has pledged to hold a referendum on the EU's Lisbon treaty if his party is elected later this year. Mr Cameron told the Financial Times newspaper that he believes that the Labour government under Prime Minister Gordon Brown may hold an election in 2009, possibly as early as April. Under this scenario "we could have a referendum in October," the Conservative politician said.
Read article at euobserver.com

January 14, 2009

Military Planners, in Nod to Obama, Are Preparing for a Faster Iraq Withdrawal
Military commanders are drawing up plans for a faster withdrawal of American troops from Iraq in anticipation that President-elect Barack Obama will reject current proposals as too slow, Pentagon and military officials said Wednesday.
Read article in the New York Times (USA)

January 13, 2009

Bush gives Blair highest US civilian honour
Former prime minister receives presidential medal of freedom for 'efforts to promote democracy and peace abroad'
George Bush presented Tony Blair with the presidential medal of freedom, the highest honour awarded to civilians in the United States, at a ceremony at the White House today. The former prime minister received the medal for "efforts to promote democracy, human rights and peace abroad", the White House said.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)
Comment: Together with George Bush, Blair has been responsible for the deaths of more than one million people in Iraq. As such, rather than being given a medal, he should be put on trial for war crimes.

January 12, 2009

SCA opens the door for new Zuma charges
The judgment that quashed African National Congress President Jacob Zuma's prosecution - and led to ex-president Thabo Mbeki's ousting from office - is in tatters. Five Supreme Court of Appeal judges on Monday morning unanimously overturned Judge Chris Nicholson's ruling that Zuma's prosecution was invalid because the National Prosecuting Authority had failed to invite the ANC leader to make representations about the criminal allegations against him before charging him. Nicholson's judgment was the basis on which Thabo Mbeki was fired as president.
Read article on the Independent Online website (South Africa)
Comment: The Supreme Court of Appeal judges’ ruling opens the way for Zuma to face new corruption charges within months - just before the next South African general election at which he is expected to stand for the post of president.

January 11, 2009

Loosen Britain's ties with European Union, say two-thirds of voters
Almost two-thirds of voters want a significant loosening of Britain's ties with the European Union including an end to the supremacy of the European Court of Justice, a new opinion poll reveals. The YouGov survey for the TaxPayersAlliance and Global Vision, the Eurosceptic pressure group, shows that voters remain antagonistic towards the EU in the wake of the Lisbon Treaty, which increased the powers of Brussels at the expense of national governments, as well as towards the euro, despite recent falls in the value of the pound.
Read article in the Sunday Telegraph (UK)

January 9, 2009

Who Owns White House History?
It’s time to remind President Bush as he leaves office that his White House records are not his personal property. They belong to the nation. The Presidential Records Act made that the law of the land after the Watergate scandal. Showing disturbing forethought, Mr. Bush signed an executive order in his first year, effectively decreeing that a sitting or former president can withhold his papers indefinitely. Congress is moving to strike down the Bush order. The House has overwhelmingly approved a corrective measure that has a good chance in the Senate. If there’s any delay, we urge President-elect Barack Obama to issue his own executive order restoring the Presidential Records Act as soon as he enters the White House.
Read editorial in the New York Times (USA)

January 7, 2009

EC head indirectly calls on Prague to ratify Lisbon treaty
The countries that have signed the EU reform Lisbon treaty should also ratify it, EC President Jose Barroso said in Prague after a meeting with Czech President Vaclav Klaus. He hinted at the fact that the EU-presiding Czech Republic is the only EU member state that has not yet ratified the Lisbon treaty, along with Ireland that rejected the treaty in a referendum in June.
Read article at ceskenoviny.cz (Czech Republic)
Comment: Despite Barroso seemingly trying to hint that the Czech Republic and Ireland are the only EU member states that have not yet ratified the Lisbon treaty, the facts speak otherwise. As he knows very well, the truth is that neither Poland nor even Germany has as yet ratified this treaty either. As such, the fact that Barroso apparently prefers not to admit this publicly speaks volumes.

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

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