Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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December 1, 2008

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

November 25, 2008

Oregano could help eradicate MRSA superbug
A natural oil found in oregano could help fight deadly hospital superbug MRSA, early research has indicated. Scientists have discovered that the herb, commonly used in cooking, could eradicate the deadly infection from hospital wards. A team at the University of the West of England in Bristol, working with partners in India, found that tiny quantities of carvacrol, a naturally occurring compound in oregano, is a more effective antimicrobial agent than 18 pharmaceutical drugs it was compared against.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

November 25, 2008

Amino acid may ease symptoms of fatigue: Study
Daily supplements of the amino acid l-ornithine, found in foods such as meat, fish, dairy and eggs, may have anti-fatigue effects, says new research. The daily dose of 2000 mg reduced symptoms of fatigue in 17 healthy volunteers taking part in the randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study. According to the Japanese researchers, it is difficult to consume the necessary active doses from food sources, such as meat and fish. “We recommend l-ornithine intake as a nutritional supplement in cases of physical fatigue,” wrote lead author Tomohiro Sugino in the journal Nutrition Research.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 21, 2008

Selenium may ease onset of metabolic syndrome: Study
An increased intake of selenium may decrease risk factors for metabolic syndrome and inflammation, suggests a new study from Spain.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

November 25, 2008

Sleeping pills 'could double risk of road accidents'
Sleeping pills prescribed to thousands of people in Britain could more than double the risk of road accidents, according to a new study. Even occasional use of the drugs increased the chances of a crash, say researchers at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

November 24, 2008

Antidepressants in pregnancy 'increase risk of babies suffering heart problems'
Women who take common antidepressants - such as Prozac - early in their pregnancy can significantly increase their chances of having children with heart problems, according to a new study. Expectant mothers who took Prozac were four times as likely as other women to have a baby with a heart abnormality and those who took Seroxat were three times as likely.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

November 24, 2008

Lilly Loses Bid To Limit Zyprexa Claims In Canada
Ontario’s highest court denied the drugmaker’s bid to limit potential damages in a lawsuit filed by Canadian patients, who claimed they developed diabetes after using the Zyprexa antipsycyotic, Bloomberg News writes. The Court of Appeal for Ontario in Toronto late last week denied Lilly’s request for a hearing, Matthew Baer, a plaintiffs’ lawyer, told the news service.
Read article at pharmalot.com

November 24, 2008

Pharma And Its Influence On The Media
Who is watching the watchdog? That’s a question posed in an essay in BMJ. The authors caution doctors that drugmakers may be quietly influencing some media by endowing university chairs or underwriting professional groups; fund journalism awards; sponsor video material with high-profile broadcasters, and hire public relations firms to contract with freelance writers (whose ranks are growing as newspapers throw staffers overboard) to compose stories for trade mags.
Read article at pharmalot.com

November 19, 2008

Silence! Glaxo Intimidated Another Avandia Critic
A ruckus erupted last year when reports surfaced that Glaxo was accused of intimidating John Buse, a University of North Carolina researcher who, years earlier, questioned the safety of its Avandia diabetes pill, which was linked to heart problems (back story). However, he wasn’t the only one the drugmaker tried to stifle. A doctor from a small Maryland hospital linked Avandia to congestive heart failure in 2000, but Glaxo rejected her warning and tried stop her from talking about it with other docs and hospitals, The Wall Street Journal reports.
Read article at pharmalot.com

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

U.N. – Related Issues

November 26, 2008

Universal test 'would slash Aids'
Universal testing for HIV, followed by immediate treatment could cut the number of people developing full-blown Aids by up to 95%, a Lancet study says. The World Health Organization (WHO) also found that such a strategy could virtually eliminate HIV transmission. The study used computer modelling to project what would happen if everyone over 15 was tested every year. But the WHO said that weak health care systems meant that universal testing was not a realistic idea.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)
Comment: Despite around a quarter of a century’s research and billions of pounds of government funding, most scientists involved in AIDS research believe that a vaccine against HIV is further away than ever and some are actually admitting that effective immunisation against the virus may never be possible. Moreover, given that some vaccine trials have seemingly even increased the risk among vaccine recipients of becoming infected with HIV, the question has to be asked as to whether most current orthodox HIV/AIDS research is exploring the wrong avenues. In considering this, we note in particular that whilst the promoters of ARV drugs – including the World Health Organization - say “there is no evidence that, taken alone, micronutrient supplements prevent HIV disease progression,” the truth is that the clinical benefits of micronutrient supplements have been demonstrated in HIV/AIDS. As such, bearing in mind the numerous ethical and human rights issues that universal HIV testing raises – that even the World Health Organization itself would appear to recognize – we agree with those who say that this strategy would involve over-testing, over-treatment, side effects, resistance, and potentially reduced autonomy of the individual in their choices of care.

For more U.N. – related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

November 25, 2008

Is the FDA trying to end-run DSHEA—again?
Today, the American Association for Health Freedom (AAHF) and its international affiliate, the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH), jointly submitted comments to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in response to its request for comments from industry and consumers to help them interpret recent changes to Section 912 of the Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA). The submission was accompanied by comments from 700 concerned citizens and practitioners exasperated over the latest threat to supplements from the FDA. The FDA’s unprecedented, controversial, and ambiguous changes to Section 912, specifically the addition of Section 301 (ll), may mean that all food products, including dietary supplements, could be barred from being marketed if they have been the subject of published clinical studies. AAHF and ANH point out that this provision is so far-reaching that a very large number of commonly consumed foods could be impacted by the new regulation and hence barred from interstate trade.
Read press release on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)

November 25, 2008

Experts call for mass trials of vitamin D supplement
Vitamin D supplements for Scots should be tested “sooner rather than later” to demonstrate whether they can improve the nation's health, international experts told the Scottish government yesterday. A conference organised by Harry Burns, the Chief Medical Officer, was told that there should be large, randomised trials as there was strong evidence that increased daily intake of vitamin D could prolong the lifespan of 7 per cent of the population.
Read article in The Times (UK)

November 22, 2008

Hairspray exposure may increase birth defect risk
Scientists have found preliminary evidence that exposure to hairspray during the first three months of pregnancy increases the risk of a common genetic deformity in baby boys. The team found that the risk of hypospadias - a defect in which the urinary opening forms on the underside of the penis - increased from 4 in 1,000 boys to 9.6 in 1,000 when the mother was exposed to hairspray during her work. The team also found that folic acid, which mothers are advised to take during early pregnancy to avoid neural tube defects, seems to prevent hypospadias. Taking the supplement led to a 36% decrease in risk.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)

November 20, 2008

Can the EU traditional herbal medicines directive be amended?
Momentum to amend Europe’s botanicals directive is growing despite the European Commission stating no part of the controversial legislation will be altered before May, 2011, when thousands of products without appropriate registrations may be wiped from store shelves across the bloc. Come 2011, any herbal products seeking to make non-medicinal claims in any of the EU’s 27 Member States will require registration under the Traditional Herbal Medicinal Products Directive (THMPD).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

November 24, 2008

Russian analyst predicts decline and breakup of U.S.
A leading Russian political analyst has said the economic turmoil in the United States has confirmed his long-held view that the country is heading for collapse, and will divide into separate parts. Professor Igor Panarin said in an interview with the respected daily Izvestia published on Monday: "The dollar is not secured by anything. The country's foreign debt has grown like an avalanche, even though in the early 1980s there was no debt. By 1998, when I first made my prediction, it had exceeded $2 trillion. Now it is more than 11 trillion. This is a pyramid that can only collapse."
Read article on the RIA Novosti website (Russia)

November 21, 2008

EU developing 'militarised' space policy which could trigger 'arms race'
The European Union is developing a military space policy which has the "potential for an arms race", a report has claimed. The European Space Agency is accused of developing technology to dominate the "high ground" of space, including a multimillion pound EU Satellite Centre in Spain. The Transnational Institute, a Dutch think-tank, said: "EU-financed communication and spy satellites are slowly becoming reality and in the long term the inclusion of space-based missile defence and other more offensive uses of space are real options for an increasingly ambitious EU military space policy."
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

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