Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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November 24, 2008

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

November 19, 2008

Common vitamin may prevent skin cancer
A vitamin found in meats, nuts, grains and cereals may be more effective than sunscreen in preventing skin cancer, new research has found. Nicotinamide, or Vitamin B3, prevents damage from both UVA and UVB radiation by protecting the immune system, and could be taken in tablet form or added to sunscreen, Associate Professor Diona Damian of the University of Sydney says.
Read article in the New Zealand Herald

November 13, 2008

Hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure: researchers
Drinking hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure in pre-hypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults, according to new research presented to the American Heart Association (AHA). And those with the highest systolic blood pressure readings at the start of the study (129 or above) had a greater response to hibiscus tea.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

November 18, 2008

New case of rare brain infection PML reported for Raptiva
Genentech has reported a second case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy which has resulted in the death of a 73-year-old patient who had been treated with the firm’s chronic psoriasis drug Raptiva.
Read article at pharmatimes.com

November 17, 2008

NHS medical research plan threatens patient privacy
Chair of data watchdog warns new proposal is 'ethically unacceptable'
The privacy of millions of NHS patients will be critically undermined by a government plan to let medical researchers have access to personal files, the health information watchdog told the Guardian last night. The prime minister and Department of Health want to give Britain's research institutes an advantage against overseas competitors by opening up more than 50m records, to identify patients who might be willing to take part in trials of new drugs and treatments. They are consulting on a proposal that is buried in the small print of the NHS constitution that would permit researchers for the first time to write to patients who share a particular set of medical conditions to seek their participation in trials. It would result in patients receiving a letter from a stranger who knew their most intimate medical secrets, which would be regarded by many as a breach of trust by doctors who are supposed to keep information confidential.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)
Comment: Could the British Prime Minister possibly have been influenced in his enthusiasm for this scheme by Andrew Witty, CEO of GlaxoSmithKline, who sits on his so-called 'Business Council' and meets him several times a year to “help steer policy”, one wonders…?

November 17, 2008

J&J Units Must Pay $16.6 Million for Pain-Patch Death
Two units of Johnson & Johnson must pay $16.6 million to the family of a Chicago-area woman who died after using a Duragesic pain-patch, a state jury found, dealing the company its fourth defeat in as many trials since 2006. Janice DiCosolo, 38, died in February 2004 because the patch she was wearing delivered a fatal dose of the narcotic fentanyl, the device's main ingredient, a jury of six men and six women decided today in Illinois state court in Chicago.
Read article at bloomberg.com

November 17, 2008

JUPITER Cholesterol Drug Trial: Marketing Tactics Threaten Public Health and Wealth
There is a climate of elation in the world of pharma: A recent study seems to suggest that cholesterol lowering medication should perhaps be given to everyone, regardless of their level of cholesterol, to prevent future heart attacks. This is big money. At present, sales of cholesterol lowering medications are worth tens of billions of dollars, on a much more limited set of prescribing guidelines. Yet, there are huge numbers of people suffering from the side effects of statins, which include severe muscle pains, cognitive trouble and even Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Vera Hassner Sharav of the Alliance for Human Research Protection discusses the JUPITER study and its implications for our health in an article that looks at the study's limitations and inherent conflicts of interest, as well as the financial aspects of medicating healthy people to lower cholesterol.
Read article on Sepp Hasslberger's Health Supreme website

November 13, 2008

Chemotherapy contributes to a quarter of cancer deaths: study
A new study has raised serious questions about the use of chemotherapy for late-stage cancer patients. The review of 600 cancer patients in Britain who died within 30 days of treatment has found that one in four of the deaths was either caused or hastened by the chemotherapy.
Read article on the ABC News website (Australia)
Comment: The use of toxic chemotherapy and other dangerous approaches to the treatment of cancer primarily serves one goal: to use the cancer epidemic as a global market for the pharmaceutical investment business with patented drugs. Unbeknownst to many of the patients who undergo these treatments, their most frequent side-effects include the causing of additional cancers - thus turning the cancer disease into a financial goldmine for the pharmaceutical industry. To learn about Dr. Rath’s discovery in cancer, and discover how the natural amino acid lysine and vitamin C can safely and effectively control cancer metastasis without the horrific side-effects suffered by chemotherapy patients, click here.

October 21, 2008

1 in 4 new bio meds cause serious side effects
Study: Drugs made from living materials often later need safety warning
Nearly a fourth of widely used new-generation biological drugs for several common diseases produce serious side effects that lead to safety warnings soon after they go on the market, the first major study of its kind found. Included in the report released Tuesday were the arthritis drugs Humira and Remicade, cancer drugs Rituxan and Erbitux, and the heart failure drug Natrecor. All wound up being flagged for safety.
Read article at msnbc.com

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

GMO News

November 17, 2008

GM crops to be grown at military sites
THE Government is drawing up plans to grow genetically modified crops in top secret military locations to thwart saboteurs. The campaign may see crops grown at sites such as Porton Down in Salisbury, which carries out military research and includes a science park. The police could also be asked to target opponents of GM crops in the same way they have clamped down on some animal rights protesters. Ministers intend to scrap a rule that says scientists must disclose the location of GM crop trials on a government website.
Read article in the London Evening Standard (UK)
Comment: As poll after poll shows that consumers do not want to eat genetically modified food, the pro-GM lobby is growing increasingly desperate.

For more GMO news, click here.

Other Health-related News

November 19, 2008

Low Vitamin D may lead to cardiac death
Sunshine is indeed the key to a long and healthy life, for a new study has found that vitamin D deficiency can harm cardiovascular health and also result in death due to heart failure.
Read article in the Times of India

November 18, 2008

'Call to action' issued for raising vitamin D levels
Recommended daily intakes of vitamin D should be raised to 2,000 International Units, says a group of 18 scientists from the University of California. The “call to action” by the UC scientists, led by Anthony Norman, echoes a number of others from leading academics across the globe, and may increase the need for policy makers to review current guidelines for the vitamin. Such increases could also open opportunities for food fortification and supplements. Current recommended daily intakes (RDIs) of vitamin D are 200 IU for people up to 50 years of age, 400 IU for people between 51 and 70, and 600 IU for over the 70s years. “The consensus among UC scientists who signed this statement is that 2000 IU per day of vitamin D3, a form of vitamin D, is the appropriate intake for most adult Americans,” said Norman.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

November 18, 2008

JAMA: synthetic low dose vitamins—of course they don't work!
Around 40% of people in western countries, and a growing proportion in developing countries, consume vitamin and mineral supplements. Those who know most about how nutrients work in the body—integrative medicine/functional medicine/nutritional medicine practitioners—know that you aren't going to be able show that cheap, supermarket-style, synthetic vitamins are going to reduce the risk of heart disease. Well, that's exactly what Dr Howard Sesso and colleagues at the Brigham & Women's Hospital at Harvard did. And they seemed surprised that after 10 years of tudying nearly 15,000 people, these supplements didn't work?
Read article and press release on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)

November 17, 2008

Toxic Chemicals Blamed for Gulf War Illness
Gulf War illness, dismissed by some as a psychosomatic disorder, is a very real illness that affects at least 25 percent of the 700,000 U.S. veterans who took part in the 1991 Gulf War. Its likely cause was exposure to toxic chemicals that included pesticides that were often overused during the war, as well as a drug given to U.S. troops to protect them from nerve gas, a frequent weapon of choice of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein.
Read article in the Washington Post (USA)

November 17, 2008

Study helps clarify role of vitamin D in cancer therapy
A colon cancer cell isn't a lost cause. Vitamin D can tame the rogue cell by adjusting everything from its gene expression to its cytoskeleton. In the Nov. 17 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology, Ordóñez-Morán et al. show that one pathway governs the vitamin's diverse effects. The results help clarify the actions of a molecule that is undergoing clinical trials as a cancer therapy.
Read article at physorg.com

November 17, 2008

Magnesium may be key to calcium’s cancer benefits: study
The anti-colon cancer effects of calcium may be linked to magnesium levels, suggesting a need for both minerals in reducing the risk of the disease, says a new study. Researchers from Vanderbilt University found that low ratios of the minerals were associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer, according to findings presented at the Seventh Annual American Association for Cancer Research International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research.
Read article at nutringredients.com
Comment: More evidence of the important role that nutrient synergy plays in maximizing the health benefits of micronutrients.

November 15, 2008

Campaigner wins seven-year battle to force rethink on use of pesticides
•Defra must reassess health risks and policy, says judge
•Victim suffered 24 years of illness from crop spraying
An environmental campaigner yesterday won a landmark victory against the government in a long-running legal battle over the use of pesticides. The high court ruled that Georgina Downs, who runs the UK Pesticides Campaign, had produced "solid evidence" that people exposed to chemicals used to spray crops had suffered harm. The court said the government had failed to comply with a European directive designed to protect rural communities from exposure to the toxins. It said the environment department, Defra, must reassess its policy and investigate the risks to people who are exposed.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)

November 13, 2008

CAPE TOWN CAPERS – CODEX MEETS AGAIN ON NUTRITION
This year, the Codex Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses (CCNSFDU) took place in Cape Town, South Africa, from November 3-7, 2008, at the Southern Sun Cape Sun Hotel; and the National Health Federation (NHF) sent its voice - the only voice - for health freedom there to insert a note of reason as hundreds of bureaucrats with little, if any, love of liberty sketched out global food guidelines that will impact billions of human beings.
Read press release on the website of the National Health Federation (USA)

November 12, 2008

Ministers agree food colour ban
Ministers have agreed that six artificial food colourings should be phased out after research found a link with hyperactivity in children. The Food Standards Agency called for the voluntary removal earlier this year while European regulators work to agree a continent-wide ban. The food colourings should now be phased out by 2009.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

November 6, 2008

MEPs back toxic pesticide ban despite industry pressure
In the face of strong opposition from agribusiness and industry, MEPs have backed a ban on toxic pesticides. On Wednesday (5 November) deputies in the European Parliament's environment committee voted on two legislative proposals from the commission, one on approval of pesticides and the other aiming to reduce their use across the EU. The committee backed 39 to 20, with six abstentions, a cross-party compromise that would see a list of chemical ingredients - or 'active substances' - that are approved drawn up at the EU level. Certain highly toxic substances - those that cause cancer, are toxic to reproduction or negatively affect the hormonal, nervous or immune systems - are to be banned where they pose a significant risk. Nevertheless, even these substances may be used in cases of serious danger to plant health.
Read article at euobserver.com
Comment: Whilst there is clearly a very long way to go before European consumers can be assured that the food on their plates is safe to consume, this development is at least a small step in the right direction. Nevertheless, the fact that so many highly toxic substances may still be used, and that little or no attention is being paid to how they react in combination with each other, remains deeply worrying.

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

November 18, 2008

Iraq war 'violated rule of law'
Legal advice given to Tony Blair by the attorney general prior to the Iraq war was fundamentally "flawed," a former law lord has claimed. Lord Bingham said Lord Goldsmith had given Mr Blair "no hard evidence" that Iraq had defied UN resolutions "in a manner justifying resort to force". Therefore, the action by the UK and US was "a serious violation of international law," Lord Bingham added.
Read article on the BBC News website (UK)

November 15, 2008

Now the European Union's own anti-fraud watchdog Olaf is under investigation
The EU's own anti-fraud watchdog is itself under investigation over suspect procedures, it has emerged.
Olaf, the European Commission's which is responsible for stamping out misuse of EU money and conflicts of interest among Eurocrats, is itself subject to an investigation over its staff nomination procedures. The probe follows the appointment to Olaf's staff selection board of a woman was was herself already under investigation by Olaf in a fraud case. The woman, who has not been named, was due to advise the head of Olaf on the appointment of new directors. Following a complaint by Dutch Euro MP Paul van Buitenen, who sits as an independent, the woman was removed from the selection board and the commission launched an inquiry into procedures at its own fraud arm.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

November 14, 2008

An offer they couldn't refuse
The CIA is often credited with 'advice' on Hollywood films, but no one is truly sure about the extent of its shadowy involvement
Everyone who watches films knows about Hollywood's fascination with spies. From Hitchcock's postwar espionage thrillers, through cold war tales such as Torn Curtain, into the paranoid 1970s when the CIA came to be seen as an agency out of control in films such as Three Days of the Condor, and right to the present, with the Bourne trilogy and Ridley Scott's forthcoming Body of Lies, film-makers have always wanted to get in bed with spies. What's less widely known is how much the spies have wanted to get in bed with the film-makers. In fact, the story of the CIA's involvement in Hollywood is a tale of deception and subversion that would seem improbable if it were put on screen.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

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