Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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September 23, 2008

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

September 17, 2008

Daily walking boosts health, survival among the very old: study
Octogenarians who walk an hour or more each day are less likely to die and or be prone to serious illness compared with less active counterparts, according to a study published on Wednesday.
Read article at physorg.com

September 16, 2008

Healthy living halves risk of early death: study
Women who eat right, exercise and never smoke tobacco more than halve the risk of dying from cancer or heart disease, a long-term study released Wednesday said. The study is based on data provided by 80,000 women in the United States who were between 34 and 59 years old when the investigation began in 1980.
Read AFP news report at google.com

September 15, 2008

Clean living 'slows cell ageing'
Taking more exercise and eating the right foods may help increase levels of an enzyme vital for guarding against age-related cell damage, work suggests. Among 24 men asked to adopt healthy lifestyle changes for a US study in The Lancet Oncology, levels of telomerase increased by 29% on average. Telomerase repairs and lengthens telomeres, which cap and protect the ends of chromosomes housing DNA. As people age, telomeres shorten and cells become more susceptible to dying.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: The lifestyle changes undertaken by the participants in the study consisted of a diet high in fruit and vegetables, supplements of vitamins and fish oils, and an exercise regimen.

September 12, 2008

Broccoli 'may help protect lungs'
A substance found in broccoli may limit the damage which leads to serious lung disease, research suggests. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often caused by smoking and kills about 30,000 UK residents a year. US scientists found that sulforapane increases the activity of the NRF2 gene in human lung cells which protects cells from damage caused by toxins.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

September 12, 2008

Mediterranean diet 'cuts risk of cancer and heart disease'
A "Mediterranean style" diet significantly reduces the risk of dying from heart disease and cancer, according to a comprehensive new study.
Eating like the Italians or the Greeks can also substantially reduce the risk of developing neurological conditions like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Scientists analysed the results of 12 major published studies involving more than 1.5 million people. They found that those who stuck closely to a diet rich in olive oil, grains, fish, fruit and vegetables, with low amounts of meat, dairy products and alcohol, were nine per cent less likely to die of heart disease, one of Britain's biggest killers. The chance of developing all types of cancer was six per cent lower, the researchers found, while the likelihood of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease was reduced by 13 per cent.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

September 10, 2008

Vitamin K2 linked to better heart health
Increased intakes of vitamin K2 from dietary sources may reduce the build up of calcium in arteries that leads to hardening of the blood vessels, says a new study.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

September 19, 2008

Paracetamol linked to three-fold increased risk of asthma in children
Giving young children Calpol or other paracetamol medicines increases the risk of them developing asthma, research has shown. Children aged six and seven who had paracetamol at least once a month were at three times the risk of having asthma than those who were never given it. Babies who were given the drug under the age of one were more likely to have asthma at six or seven but the greatest risk was amongst those who were receiving high doses, defined as once a month for 12 months.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

September 18, 2008

Cerebral palsy link to antibiotics given during premature birth
Giving antibiotics to pregnant women going into premature labour increases the risk of cerebral palsy in the child, research has found.
Children born to mothers given a combination of two antibiotics in an attempt to stop them giving birth prematurely had an almost three fold higher risk of developing cerebral palsy, a long term study of more than 4,000 pregnant women found.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

September 17, 2008

J&J reports anemia drug linked to deaths in study
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- A blockbuster anemia drug made by a Johnson & Johnson company has been linked to the deaths of some patients in an experiment testing whether it could help stroke patients.
Read Associated Press news report at yahoo.com

September 15, 2008

Most Cancer Treatment Studies Aren't Published, Study Finds
Concern Raised about 'Cancer Publication Bias'
Less than 20 percent of registered clinical trials of cancer treatment are eventually published in medical journals, according to a study published online today by the journal "The Oncologist."
Read article at marketwatch.com
Comment: The publication rate was particularly low for "industry-sponsored" studies, such as those funded by pharmaceutical companies -- just 5.9 percent, compared to 59 percent for studies sponsored by collaborative research networks. The researchers suspect that the rate of negative results is much higher in the studies that have gone unpublished.

September 11, 2008

FDA Reports Deadly Brain Infection With Rituxan
The agency says a woman died of the rare viral infection more than a year and a half after discontinuing the drug, which is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and is marketed in the US by Genentech and Biogen Idec. Although cases of the infection have previously been reported in patients taking Rituxan for unapproved uses, including lupus, the FDA says the latest instance is the first reported in a patient taking the drug for arthritis.
Read article at pharmalot.com

September 11, 2008

Drugs affect more drinking water
Testing prompted by an Associated Press story that revealed trace amounts of pharmaceuticals in drinking water supplies has shown that more Americans are affected by the problem than previously thought - at least 46 million.
Read article at physorg.com
Comment: The presence of pharmaceutical drugs in drinking water is becoming an growing problem worldwide. In the UK, for example, powerful cancer and psychiatric drugs have been found in tap water, leading doctors to express concern about exposing pregnant women to drugs that could harm an unborn child.

September 10, 2008

Medical schools, journals start to fight drug industry influence
Just about every segment of the medical community is piling on the pharmaceutical industry these days, accusing drugmakers of deceiving the public, manipulating doctors and putting profits before patients. Recent articles and editorials in major medical journals blast the industry. Medical schools, teaching hospitals and physician groups are changing rules to limit the influence of pharmaceutical sales reps. And three top editors of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine last month publicly sided against the drug industry in a U.S. Supreme Court case over whether patients harmed by government-approved medicines may still sue in state courts.
Read article in USA Today

September 9, 2008

The Ties Between Pharma & Academic Med Centers
Want to know how much a drugmaker paid a doctor at an academic medical center? How about the amount of samples dropped off? Or the access given sales reps? Well, The Institute on Medicine as a Profession, or IMAP, has launched what it calls the first database of its kind to let everyone - you and me - review and compare conflict of interest policies among the nation’s 125 academic medical centers.
Read article at pharmalot.com

September 9, 2008

Patients at care homes get pills they don’t need
Over half of nursing home patients in Northern Ireland are prescribed inappropriate drugs for sedation when there is no medical need, research claimed today.
Read article in the Belfast Telegraph (Northern Ireland)

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

September 19, 2008

Charges against Pan's Selim dropped
THE Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions has dropped four criminal charges against former alternative medicine tycoon Jim Selim. Mr Selim, the founder of Pan Pharmaceuticals, had been charged with failing to disclose material information relating to four separate board meetings. Last month, Mr Selim won a $55 million compensation payment from the Federal Government over the collapse of his company. Pan Pharmaceuticals went into liquidation in 2005 after a decision in 2003 by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to suspend its licence and withdraw 219 of its products. Outside the court, Mr Selim said he felt vindicated by today's decision and he would push ahead with preparations for a $200 million class action against the TGA over the collapse of the company in 2003.
Read article at news.com.au (Australia)
Comment: To learn the full story behind what was arguably the largest, quickest and most comprehensive recall of health care products in world history, read Eve Hillary’s in-depth article.

September 18, 2008

Four out of five physicians recommend supplements: CRN poll
The dietary supplements industry has been boosted by a Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) survey results that show 79 per cent of physicians and health care professionals recommend dietary supplements to their patients. Bone, joint and heart health are among the main health conditions for which US health professionals recommend dietary supplements to patients. Maintaining overall health and wellness and a healthy cholesterol level also figured highly in the survey that polled around 900 physicians and 300 registered nurses and nurse practitioners.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: Just as significantly, the survey also found that 72 percent of the 900 U.S. physicians polled use dietary supplements themselves.

September 15, 2008

Britons missing 'five-a-day' fruit and veg target, study claims
British people are failing to eat the recommended five portions of fruit and vegetables per day, new research shows.
According to a study of the consumer habits of the nation, just 12 per cent of the population manages to hit the target recommended by experts. A further 12 per cent do not eat any fruit and vegetables at all, the research found.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

August 24, 2008

Vitamin deficiency affecting millions worldwide
Millions of people have been suffering from various diseases like anaemia, cretinism, blindness, and goitre worldwide for decades due to deficiency of vitamins and minerals (VM deficiency). This proves the true significance of these ingredients in our daily intakes.
Read article at gorkhapatra.org.np (Nepal)

August 23, 2008

Govt may face class action over Pan collapse
A natural health care consultant says at least 100 people have expressed interest in suing the Commonwealth Government for compensation over the collapse of Pan Pharmaceuticals. Earlier this month, the Government agreed to settle with Pan's former head Jim Selim. Mr Selim claimed that the Therapeutic Goods Administration acted vindictively in the 2003 recall of hundreds of complementary medicine products and the removal of Pan's manufacturing licence.
Read article at ABC News (Australia)

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

September 19, 2008

Russia wants cooperation with U.S., will rise above its rhetoric
Russia wants to maintain cooperation with the United States and will not succumb to its rhetoric and enter a new spiral of confrontation, the Foreign Ministry said Friday. Responding to the U.S. top diplomat's speech on the Russia-Georgia conflict, the ministry said Russia was "prepared to deal with the American side in all formats" but would not "succumb to its rhetoric and get drawn into confrontation, either verbal or any other."
Read article on the RIA Novosti website (Russia)

September 19, 2008

Zimbabwe faces long and painful road to health
Even if all goes well it could take more than 12 years for Zimbabwe's economy to recover peak levels of per capita income reached in 1991, according to a United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) report seen by the Financial Times. The report, "Comprehensive Economic Recovery in Zimbabwe", is due to be published today. Researched and written by five Zimbabwean economists, it is the first economic assessment to be published in the wake of this week's -power-sharing agreement between the veteran autocrat Robert Mugabe and his opposition rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, now prime minister designate
Read article in the Financial Times (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

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