Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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April 18, 2008

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Natural Health News

April 16, 2008

Vitamin E may help Alzheimer's patients live longer
People with Alzheimer's disease who take vitamin E appear to live longer than those who don't take vitamin E, according to research that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology 60th Anniversary Annual Meeting in Chicago, April 12-19, 2008.
Read article at physorg.com

April 16, 2008

Omega-3 EPA linked to improved gullet health
An increased intake of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may improve the fatty acid levels composition in the gullet, and reduce the risk of cancer, suggests a new study. "After six months of dietary supplementation with EPA, we observed important changes in the fatty acid composition of Barrett's mucosal epithelium," wrote lead author Samir Mehta in this month's issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 14, 2008

Blueberries 'improve memory'
Eating a couple of portions of blueberries every day can reverse memory loss, according to a study.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

April 11, 2008

Maternal omega-3 again linked to children's coordination
Increased intake of the omega-3 DHA during pregnancy could produce improved motor function in the offspring in later life, suggests a new study from Canada. Studying 109 Inuit infants in Arctic Quebec, the researchers report in the Journal of Pediatrics that levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the mother's were directly related to levels in the umbilical cord, and subsequently in the foetus. And increased levels were linked to improved visual, cognitive, and motor development in the offspring, report the researchers from Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit and Laval University.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 10, 2008

Cruciferous veg again linked to bladder cancer protection
An increased intake of cruciferous vegetables may slash the risk of bladder cancer by 36 per cent, says new research that attributes the benefits to the isothiocyanate content.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 9, 2008

Vitamin K2 linked to lower prostate cancer risk
An increased intake of vitamin K2 may reduce the risk of prostate cancer by 35 per cent, suggest results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).
Read article at nutraingredients.com

For more natural health news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

April 16, 2008

Many Ads For Psych Meds Are Unsubstantiated
A new study finds that the accuracy of ads for antidepressants and antipsychotics often make claims that can't be verified and attempts to obtain data cited in the ads from the drugmakers were rarely successful.
Read article at pharmalot.com

April 15, 2008

Vioxx Studies: Ghostwriters And Merck Sponsorship
So you thought all those Vioxx studies in medical journals were independent, hands-off affairs? Not necesssarily. An examination of medical journal articles about Vioxx and court documents from Vioxx lawsuits found that Merck employees or ghostwriters were frequently involved in various articles, but the primary authors were often academics who actually had little to do with the studies or didn't always disclose financial ties to Merck.
Read article at pharmalot.com

April 15, 2008

Risk of death from rofecoxib in some trials may have been misrepresented by study sponsor
A comparison of internal company documents, data submitted by the company to the FDA, and published clinical trial results indicates that the risk-benefit profile of rofecoxib in clinical trials involving patients with cognitive impairment may have been misrepresented by study sponsor Merck, according to an article in the April 16 issue of JAMA.
Read article at physorg.com

April 15, 2008

Use of ghostwriters, guest authors appears frequent for studies involving rofecoxib
An examination of medical articles about rofecoxib (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) and court documents from litigation related to this product indicates that company employees or other unacknowledged authors were frequently involved in writing clinical trial articles and review articles, but that primary authorship was often attributed to academically affiliated investigators who may have had little to do with the study, or who did not always disclose financial support from the sponsor of the study, according to an article in the April 16 issue of JAMA.
Read article at physorg.com

April 15, 2008

Organon Allegedly Covered Up Raplon Side Effects
Here's more trouble for Schering-Plough. The drugmaker just spent $14.3 billion to buy Organon, which now faces allegations that the number and severity of serious adverse events associated with its troubled neuromuscular blocking agent known as Raplon were not disclosed before or after FDA approval, according to a whistleblower lawsuit filed in federal court in New Jersey.
Read article at pharmalot.com

April 14, 2008

Diuretics associated with bone loss in older men
Older men who take loop diuretics, commonly prescribed drugs for heart failure and hypertension, appear to have increased rates of hip bone loss than men who are not taking this medication, according to a report in the April 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Read article at physorg.com

April 11, 2008

Drugmakers To Spend $1B On Direct Marketing
What will that get them? With revenues forecast to hit $10.6 billion, the return on investment is forecast to reach $10.27 on each $1 spent, according to a new report by the Direct Marketing Association. And between 2007 and 2012, direct marketing-driven sales are projected to compound 9.4 percent annually.
Read article at pharmalot.com

April 11, 2008

GlaxoSmithKline chief JP Garnier granted options that could pay £2.5m
JP Garnier, the head of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), who has had a fraught relationship with investors over his pay, will bow out of the pharmaceutical giant on a sour note after being granted options that could entitle him to be paid up to £2.5 million long after his retirement. It emerged yesterday that Dr Garnier, who will retire next month, was granted share options last year after saying in 2006 that he planned to retire. The options will not pay out until the end of the 2009-10 financial year, even though any improvement in the share price will be on the watch of Andrew Witty, GSK's European head, who is to become chief executive.
Read article in The Times (UK)

April 11, 2008

California Dreaming: Pharma Evades Gift Rules
The Golden State passed a bill four years ago that made binding PhRMA's marketing guidelines and requires drugmakers to set an upper limit on the dollar value of gifts they could give to a doc in a given year. To prove compliance, drugmakers must provide a plan, choose and abide by annual per-doctor gift limits, and post the info on their web sites declaring they're in compliance. But in a new report, Calpirg, a consumer advocacy group, claims that the limits are riddled with exceptions, and that some drugmakers have evaded even the least restrictive limits on their marketing.
Read article at pharmalot.com

April 10, 2008

Genzyme CEO gets $12.6M in 2007 pay
The chief executive of biotechnology company Genzyme Corp. received total compensation valued at $12.6 million in 2007, 16 percent less than in 2006, according to a filing Thursday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Cambridge, Mass.-based company gave Henri A. Termeer a base salary of $1.5 million and a performance-based bonus of about $2.1 million. He also garnered $105,773 in 'other' compensation, which included $66,420 for a personal driver and vehicle expenses, $28,103 for life and disability insurance and a company contribution to a 401(k) plan.
Read article at cnn.com

April 9, 2008

EU parliament approves new health chief
Parliament has formally endorsed the appointment of new Cypriot commissioner Androula Vassiliou. She replaces Markos Kyprianou, who recently left Brussels to take up the post of foreign minister in the newly elected Cypriot government. At their mini-plenary in Brussels on Wednesday, MEPs overwhelmingly voted in favour of approving the appointment of the newest member of José Manuel Barroso's 27-strong executive.
Read article at theparliament.com
Comment: Mrs Vassiliou's Curriculum Vitae states that in 2002 the Cyprus Government jointly with the Board of Directors of the Bank of Cyprus appointed her Chairperson of the Board of Trustees of the Cyprus Oncology Centre - the main patient services provided by whom consist of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone therapy. As such, anyone expecting her to take significant action against the pharmaceutical investment business with disease might be well advised not to hold their breath…

April 9, 2008

Scientists attack 'breakthrough' cancer drugs
Exaggerated claims are being made for new cancer treatments that are not justified by the evidence, scientists warned yesterday. Drugs hailed as breakthrough treatments for cancer, Britain's biggest cause of death, may be less effective and cause more harm than suspected, they said.
Read article in The Independent (UK)
Comment: Cancer is a multi-billion dollar business. The drugs used in chemotherapy kill cancer cells - but they also kill healthy cells too. That fact alone is bad enough, but it doesn't stop there. The drugs used in chemotherapy also have side-effects and many cause new cancers and new diseases, leading to the use of yet more drugs which in turn have new side effects. It's a vicious circle and a license to print money for the pharmaceutical industry. To learn the facts on chemotherapy drugs used as treatments for cancer, click here.

April 8, 2008

EU plan may let drug firms sidestep ban on advertising
Drug companies will be allowed to sidestep the ban on advertising drugs to the public under new European proposals, consumer groups warned yesterday. The European commission plans to allow drug companies, which have a history of failing to warn about the risks of their medicines, to give "information" about their drugs to the public on TV, the internet and in print.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)

April 7, 2008

Tranquillisers putting children's lives at risk
· Anti-psychotics may cause long-term harm, say critics
· Youngsters under 6 being given unlicensed drugs
New evidence has shown children's lives are being put at risk by a surge in the use of controversial tranquillising drugs which are being prescribed to control their behaviour, the Guardian has learned. The anti-psychotic drugs are being given to youngsters under the age of six even though the drugs have no licence for use in children except in certain schizophrenia cases, the report says. The number of children on the drugs has doubled since the early 1990s as the UK begins to follow a trend started in the US, but critics say they are a "chemical cosh" that could cause premature death.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)

April 7, 2008

Doctors demand freeze on use of diabetes drug for heart patients
SCOTTISH doctors have said there is "no defence" for the use of a widely prescribed diabetes drug after warnings that it should not be used in patients with heart problems, The Scotsman can reveal. The consultants, who work in the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde area, recommend no new patients are given Avandia - also known as rosiglitazone.
Read article in The Scotsman (Scotland/UK)

April 7, 2008

2.5m children on drugs in US
Antipsychotic drugs for children have taken off in the US on the back of a willingness to diagnose those with behavioural problems as having manic depression. Even children barely out of babyhood are getting a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, the modern term for the condition.
Read article in The Guardian (UK)

April 7, 2008

Medicine Mix-Ups Harm Hospitalized Kids
Medicine mix-ups, accidental overdoses and bad drug reactions harm roughly one out of 15 hospitalized children, according to the first scientific test of a new detection method.
Read article at physorg.com

April 7, 2008

Anti-psychotics may speed Alzheimer's decline
Anti-psychotic drugs frequently used in nursing homes to treat aggression in Alzheimer's patients don't provide any benefit and seem to lead to a marked decline in verbal ability, a report says.
Read article in USA Today

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Other Health-related News

April 16, 2008

Low vitamin D levels associated with an increased risk of peripheral arterial disease
Low levels of vitamin D may be associated with an increased risk for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), researchers reported at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Annual Conference 2008.
Read article at physorg.com

April 16, 2008

ANH rebuts latest anti-vitamin meta-analysis
Today has seen headlines around the world which claim that vitamin supplements can cause more harm than good. Find out here how bad science together with bad media can confuse and mislead consumers - possibly intentionally.
Read article on the website of the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) (UK)

April 16, 2008

Dutch vegetables have fewer vitamins
Over the past 20 years, the amount of essential vitamins in Dutch vegetables has fallen by over 50% in some cases, the Telegraaf reports on Wednesday. The main reason is the use of manure, the paper says, quoting an alliance of environmentally-active farmers and scientists. The over-use of manure means too many dangerous substances are being pumped into the ground, destroying natural organisms, the paper says. Research by the consumers association shows that vegetables grown in the Netherlands contain so few essential minerals such as selenium that they can barely be recorded, the Telegraaf says.
Read article at dutchnews.nl (Netherlands)
Comment: According to the researchers, the average Dutch person is now short of zinc, iron, selenium, copper and magnesium. Moreover, a lot of food grown in fields no longer contains any vitamin C. Significantly, therefore, this research echoes the findings of similar studies conducted in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and other countries which, taken together, suggest that the nutrient content of the global food supply has fallen substantially over the past few decades. To learn more, click here.

April 14, 2008

Vitamin D, calcium's colon benefits pinpointed?
Epidemiological studies supporting vitamin D and calcium for protection against colorectal cancer may be biochemically and biologically plausible, suggests new research.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com

April 10, 2008

Shifting health claim criteria may provoke legal challenge
A pan-European industry group has criticised the European Commission for issuing guidance that it will reject scientific health claim dossiers that do not contain clinical data. The Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) says the EC has "moved the goalposts" in regard to article 13 health claims of the Health and Nutrition Claims regulation and called for a revision of the guidelines. The ANH has submitted a 16-page document outlining its concerns to the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA), after it joined other groups such as the UK Health Food Manufacturers Association (HFMA) at an FSA-chaired meeting on March 27.
Read article at nutraingredients.com

April 10, 2008

Europe-wide food colour ban call
A food safety watchdog has called for a Europe-wide ban on six artificial food colourings after research found a link with hyperactivity in children. A total ban on the use of the colours would have to be agreed by the EU. So the Foods Standard Agency wants UK ministers to enforce voluntary removal of the colours by next year.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

April 8, 2008

Study links magnesium deficiency to faster aging
A lack of magnesium accelerates aging in human cells, which may explain the link between any long-term deficiency and a higher risk of aging-related diseases, a study released Monday said. Magnesium is essential for hundreds of biochemical reactions in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, and keeps bones strong. Yet research has shown that, at least in the United States, more than half the population is lacking in magnesium due to deficiencies in their diet, potentially increasing their risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis and some cancers.
Read article at physorg.com

April 5, 2008

Food additives 'could be as damaging as lead in petrol'
Artificial food colours are set to be removed from hundreds of products after a team of university researchers warned they were doing as much damage to children's brains as lead in petrol. Academics at Southampton University, who carried out an official study into seven additives for the Food Standards Agency (FSA), said children's intelligence was being significantly damaged by E-numbers. After receiving the advice last month, officials at the FSA have advised their directors to call for the food industry to remove six additives named in the study by the end of next year.
Read article in The Independent (UK)
Comment: The researchers suggested that some colourings, including tartrazine and sunset yellow, could also affect children's intelligence by up to five IQ points.

For more health-related news, click here.

See also our 2001-2008 news archive, by clicking here.

Political News

April 16, 2008

Ireland's referendum - Leaked memo to British Government exposes Irish Government conniving with foreign governments to deceive the Irish electorate
The Government has hatched an elaborate plan to deceive voters over the forthcoming EU treaty referendum, the Irish Daily Mail can today reveal. A leaked email shows that ministers are planning a deliberate campaign of misinformation to ensure that the Lisbon Treaty vote is passed when it is put to the public as required by the Constitution. Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern has even been personally assured that the European Commission will "tone down or delay" any announcements from Brussels "that might be unhelpful". Alarmingly, the email says that ministers ruled out an October referendum, which would have been better procedurally, because they feared "unhelpful developments during the French presidency - particularly related to EU defence".
Read article from the Irish Daily Mail at free-europe.org

April 14, 2008

Council spy cases hit 1,000 a month
More than 1,000 covert surveillance operations are being launched every month to investigate petty offences such as dog fouling, under-age smoking and breaches of planning regulations. Councils and other public bodies are using legislation designed to combat terrorism in order to spy on people, obtain their telephone records and find out who they are emailing. The full extent to which local authorities take advantage of new powers given to them by the Government came to light after a Dorset council admitted spying for more than two weeks on a family it suspected of lying on a school application form.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)
Comment: Far from being used to fight terrorism, British Councils are increasingly using the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (Ripa) to investigate literally anything that can be classed as a criminal offence. As such, the fact that the Act also enables the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain to monitor people's private communications and carry out surveillance proves that the "War on Terror" is not merely about fighting "terrorism" but is part of a deliberate long-term strategy by pharmaceutical investment groups to create a psychological "state of fear" and maintain global control.

April 14, 2008

'Palace, jet and personal staff of 22' for the new EU president
The proposed full-time president of the European Union is to be given a personal jet, a palatial official residence and a personal staff of up to 22, under plans being considered in Brussels.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum Initiative website.

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