Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Newsletter Archive

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November 12, 2007

Latest News Updates

Keep up-to-date on the latest health and politics news with our regular updates and analysis of the key stories from around the world.

Included in this edition: Topical Vitamin C Stops Basal Cell Carcinoma; Vitamin D 'may help slow ageing'; Merck has agreed to pay $4.85bn to settle legal claims that Vioxx caused thousands of users to suffer strokes and heart failure; Codex meeting in Germany set to decide future for vitamin consumers around the world; a sacked EU whistleblower fails in bid to have her dismissal annulled; and a UK MEP says that a major parliamentary conference on Europe's future 'defies democracy'.

Natural Health News

November 9, 2007

Topical Vitamin C Stops Basal Cell Carcinoma
The most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, often responds to a remarkably simple, safe, at-home treatment: vitamin C. Physicians and patients report that vitamin C, applied directly to basal cell skin cancers, causes them to scab over and drop off. Successful use involves a highly-concentrated vitamin C solution, directly applied to the blemish two or three times a day.
Read article at orthomolecular.org

November 8, 2007

Vitamin D 'may help slow ageing'
A vitamin made when sunlight hits the skin could help slow down the ageing of cells and tissues, say researchers. A King's College London study of more than 2,000 women found those with higher vitamin D levels showed fewer ageing-related changes in their DNA.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: Professor Brent Richards, who led the study, said: "These results are exciting because they demonstrate for the first time that people who have higher levels of vitamin D may age more slowly than people with lower levels of vitamin D.

For more natural health news, click here.

Pharma "Business with Disease" News

November 11, 2007

Drugs for ADHD 'not the answer'
Treating children who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with drugs is not effective in the long-term, research has shown. A study obtained by the BBC's Panorama programme says drugs such as Ritalin and Concerta work no better than therapy after three years of treatment. The findings by an influential US study also suggested long-term use of the drugs could stunt children's growth. It said that the benefits of drugs had previously been exaggerated.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

November 9, 2007

Vioxx settlement to total $4.85bn
The maker of Vioxx has agreed to pay $4.85bn to settle legal claims that the controversial drug caused many users to suffer strokes and heart failure. Merck & Co said it was setting up a fund to compensate victims, adding that claimants would only receive payment if certain key conditions were met. To qualify, individuals must prove they suffered serious illness, at the most two weeks after they bought the drug. The deal may end multiple lawsuits but Merck has not admitted any liability.
Read article at BBC News (UK)

November 8, 2007

Rise in use of anti-depressants
Prescriptions issued in Scotland for anti-depressants have risen more than four-fold in less than 15 years, an NHS report has revealed. NHS Quality Improvement Scotland said for every 1,000 people there were 85 daily doses of the drugs dispensed in 2006, compared with 19 doses in 1992.
Read article at BBC News (UK)
Comment: Discussing these rises, Shona Neil, chief executive of the Scottish Association for Mental Health, pointed out that: "There are a lot of people being prescribed anti-depressants inappropriately." She also dismissed claims that the new anti-depressants carried fewer side effects.

For more pharma "business with disease" news, click here.

Other Health-related News

November 12, 2007

CODEX MEETING IN GERMANY SET TO DECIDE FUTURE FOR VITAMIN CONSUMERS AROUND THE WORLD
Read press release on the Alliance for Natural Health (ANH) website (UK)

November 9, 2007

Food on agenda for US-EU trade talks
The first meeting of the Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) takes place in Washington this week, with the freeing up of the food trade on the cards. The trade talks aim to improve trade relations between the two powerhouses in an effort to remain competitive on a global basis, particularly in view of growing pressures from Asian traders. US and EU negotiators say they hope to reach deals on regulatory rules that limit trade in food during the two day talks, which begin in Washington tomorrow.
Read article at nutraingredients-usa.com
Comment: Signed in April 2007, the transatlantic economic integration agreement that created the Transatlantic Economic Council (TEC) threatens the harmonizing of U.S. dietary supplement legislation to restrictive European regulations. To learn more, click here.

For more health-related news, click here.

Political News

November 9, 2007

Sacked EU whistleblower loses claim
A Brussels whistleblower sacked for alleging that EU book-keeping was riddled with "slush funds and fraud" vowed to fight on after she lost her battle against wrongful dismissal. Marta Andreasen, the European Commission's former chief accountant, has sought for two and half years to clear her name of accusations of misconduct and disloyalty. But the EU's civil service tribunal yesterday rejected Mrs Andreasen's bid to have her dismissal annulled and upheld, in a 55-page judgment, every single complaint made against her by the commission.
Read article in the Daily Telegraph (UK)

November 8, 2007

Falling in love again
For a whirlwind 26 hours Nicolas Sarkozy attempted yesterday to recapture US hearts with a message tailor-made for Fox News: America can count on France. And for a moment senators listening to the French president's address to a joint session of congress might have been lulled into believing that French and American soldiers had stood shoulder to shoulder in every conflict since the American war of independence. There was no mention of Iraq or of the fact that his predecessor Jacques Chirac had led European opposition to the war. Mr Sarkozy solemnly pledged to stay engaged in Afghanistan for as long as it takes. In fact, France is withdrawing its special forces from the country.
Read article in the Guardian (UK)
Comment: Sarkozy presented himself as a 'friend of America' but the reality is much more sobering. His visit served to plan the first nuclear war in the history of mankind. To learn more about Sarkozy, click here.

November 8, 2007

EU debate 'defies democracy' says UK MEP
A major parliamentary conference on Europe's future has been branded "little more than the EU institutions talking to themselves". The two-day event, which started on Thursday, brings together over 500 civil society representatives for a debate on the future of Europe and the controversial EU reform treaty. They were invited by parliament to take part in a debate ahead of the expected ratification of the treaty by EU leaders in December. However, some MEPs have criticised the so-called "Citizen's Agora" event in parliament's main debating chamber, as a waste of time and money. UK Tory MEP Roger Helmer said that most of the participant organisations listed on the Agora website are "strongly pro-EU" groups and in receipt of EU funds.
Read article at theparliament.com

For more political news, visit the news pages on the website of the International Alliance for Health, Peace and Social Justice, and the news page on the European Referendum website.

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