Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Dr. Rath Health Foundation

Responsibility for a healthy world Dr. Rath Research Institute 100+ Studies Published In PubMed

Identification and characterization of amino acid starvation-induced CD24 gene in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

Int J Oncol. 2000 May;16(5):1049-54

Liu W, Vadgama JV.
Department of Internal Medicine, Molecular Oncology Program, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, UCLA, School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA.

Amino acid starvation is a pathophysiological condition that results in protein deprivation due to cancer cachexia. Using the method of differential display of reverse transcription PCR (DDRT-PCR), we isolated a cDNA fragment in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in response to amino acid starvation, which was identical with human CD24 gene. Northern blot results showed that CD24 mRNA in MCF-7 cells was constitutively expressed and significantly upregulated upon amino acid starvation. This stimulation was time-dependent and the maximal response was at 24 h. The expression of the amino acid starvation-induced CD24 mRNA decreased when starved cells were returned to a medium supplemented with amino acids. This repressive response was also time-dependent. Amino acid starvation-induced CD24 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells was completely blocked by actinomycin D, which suggested that the regulation of CD24 mRNA by amino acid availability occurred at transcriptional level. When amino acid-starved cells were refed with amino acids for 8 h, the expression of CD24 mRNA declined to the basal levels confirming that CD24 mRNA expression could be stimulated by amino acid starvation. Interestingly, CD24 mRNA was poorly detected in MCF-10 cells, a benign human breast epithelial cell line. In conclusion, CD24 mRNA expression in MCF-7 cells was upregulated upon amino acid starvation. This amino acid starvation-induced upregulation of CD24 mRNA occurred at transcriptional level. The regulation of CD24 mRNA in MCF-7 cells by amino acid availability may play an important role in the progression and metastasis of human breast cancer.